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NEWS
April 26, 2002
Traveling aboard a trolley bus, city Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano and other housing officials will talk with residents at four community events tomorrow, beginning at 9 a.m. at the New Shiloh Baptist Church parking lot, 2100 N. Monroe St., for a "Christmas in April" volunteer day in the Mondawmin area. The tour will move at 10:15 a.m. to a "chat and chew" at the Bay-Brook Housing Festival in Bayview-Brooklyn, continue with an 11:30 a.m. "meet and greet" at the Herring Run Spring Festival in Belair-Edison, and end with a 1 p.m. stop at the rededication of the Patterson Park pagoda.
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EXPLORE
November 29, 2012
Editor: On behalf of the staff and clients at Anna's House, I want to express my gratitude for the wonderful private/public partnership and collaboration between Harford Transit, Harford County Parks and Recreation and Catholic Charities of Baltimore. So often we focus on all of the negative circumstances around us, and during this holiday season, I wanted to share some positive news.  Anna's House is a program of Catholic Charities of...
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NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2006
Mayor Martin O'Malley yesterday helped topple the roof of the lone building approved to come down in a vacant Southwest Baltimore apartment complex, a large redevelopment project that has been held up for two years by a legal dispute. Attorneys from the Legal Aid Bureau waged a successful fight this week to ensure the demolished unit at Swann Avenue and Old Frederick Road in the Uplands Apartments is the only one razed until a final agreement is reached in a long-running federal court suit on behalf of former tenants seeking assurances that the new project will include low-income housing.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
Even after Jean Thomas lost her job and her husband, Sherman, became ill, she said she never missed paying the rent on the West Baltimore house the couple shares with their daughter and four young grandchildren. Yet after seven years in the rent-subsidized, four-bedroom rowhouse on North Fremont Avenue, the family is bracing to be evicted Tuesday morning. "I won't have a choice but to leave," said Jean Thomas, adding that her family has nowhere to go. "It's hard to find a place if you don't have a job. " Thomas blames the situation on the actions of her two adult sons.
NEWS
By Matthew Mosk and Matthew Mosk,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1999
Legislation promising to sweep Baltimore clear of about 40,000 boarded-up rowhouses -- inner-city eyesores that have given cover to drug addicts and dragged down property values -- passed the Maryland Senate yesterday, virtually ensuring final approval. The bill offers city housing officials unprecedented power to seize and demolish abandoned property. It has passed the House of Delegates, and needs only minor adjustments before it gains final approval and is sent to the governor to be signed.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1996
Federal housing officials are expressing concern over Baltimore's new plan to exclude middle-income residents in the rowhouse communities that will replace the Lafayette Courts and Lexington Terrace housing projects."
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1995
Federal investigators probing the Baltimore Housing Authority brought criminal charges yesterday against officers of J&M Construction Co., one of the most prominent contracting firms awarded work under the agency's troubled no-bid repair program.Company president James. M. Myers, 59, of Fallston, and his son, Terry Myers, 29, of Abingdon, the company's secretary-treasurer, illegally paid about $10,000 in cash to the former manager of the program, according to papers filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | January 29, 2008
The smell of filth filled the small apartment. The couches were overturned, along with a washing machine, and the floors were streaked with grime. A bra lay on the floor in front of Shirley Gilbert's refrigerator. The underwear wasn't hers. Neither, she says, was the mess that drug dealers and junkies left for her to clean up in her one-bedroom apartment in the Latrobe public housing community in East Baltimore. "It's not safe here," Gilbert said. "They come in and do what they want to do. They bust the window.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | October 29, 1994
The executive director of a Baltimore nonprofit housing corporation that is being investigated for questionable expenses took out thousands of dollars in personal loans, city housing officials say.Housing Assistance Corp. Director Jennifer Jones-Williams lent herself an amount far exceeding the $500 limit allowed by the group, which develops and manages homes for the poor, said city Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III.To repay the loan, she has been deducting $200 each month from her salary.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | November 7, 1992
A steel turnstile being installed as a desperate effort to provide safety in Baltimore's public housing projects has been smashed by vandals, city housing officials said.The turnstile, one of two being installed at the Lafayette Courts project in East Baltimore, was unscrewed from its foundation and bashed into pieces on the ground about 2 a.m. yesterday.Construction had begun two weeks ago on the 7-foot turnstiles, metallic barriers that housing officials hope will keep out unwanted visitors and curb rampant drug-dealing and violent crime in the projects.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
Representatives from the Baltimore sheriff's office moved across a city housing authority parking lot Wednesday morning, tagging 20 of the agency's vehicles to be seized and eventually sold to pay part of a court judgment to lead paint victims. The Housing Authority of Baltimore City has resisted paying siblings Antonio Fulgham and Brittany McCutcheon the $2.59 million awarded by a jury in 2010, as the agency appeals the case. But the plaintiffs, who suffered lead poisoning while living in public housing, have filed legal actions to move forward with collecting the debts.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
The Baltimore sheriff's office began the process Wednesday of seizing 20 vehicles owned by the city's housing authority — part of a move by two siblings who suffered lead poisoning in public housing to force the agency to make good on $2.59 million in damages awarded by a jury. Just after 9 a.m. at an East Baltimore lot, two members of the sheriff's office went truck by truck, verifying information and slapping each with a sticker that said, "A levy has been made on this property by the sheriff of Baltimore City.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2011
While most of the debate on President Barack Obama's jobs bill has focused on taxes, spending on infrastructure and unemployment insurance, housing officials in Baltimore and across the country are monitoring a little-remarked proposal to revitalize vacant and abandoned properties. Though housing officials generally praise the $15 billion program, called "Project Rebuild," they say its impact will depend in large part on whether it is geared to address recent foreclosures or the more chronic abandonment of the sort found in cities such as Baltimore and Detroit.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2011
Baltimore housing officials are warning that the city's homeless and others in need are being misled by deceptive fliers offering Section 8 housing vouchers. The fake fliers are circulating throughout the city, according to statement from the Housing Authority of Baltimore City. The fliers tell people to bring pay stubs, Social Security information and proof of income to the housing office to apply for a program that actually ran out of money last year. "These claims are not true," the statement from the housing authority says.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2011
Baltimore housing officials hired a man as a housing inspector and promoted him to a supervisory position although he had been fired by the state Department of Corrections for forging sick leave forms and convicted of more than a dozen counts of theft, according to a report released Tuesday by the city's inspector general. Algie C. Epps worked for the city Department of Housing and Community Development for five years after he was fired by the corrections department. He was promoted to assistant superintendent of code enforcement in spite of his criminal record, according to the report by city Inspector General David McClintock.
NEWS
February 20, 2011
The Census Bureau reported recently what many people have long suspected: Over the last decade, the growth of Maryland's population has largely been driven by Hispanics, who increasingly are settling in suburban areas of the state. The data don't say how many of them are immigrants, but it's a good bet that many are. At the same time, the report noted, the population of Baltimore City, which has been declining for decades, fell by another 30,000 residents since 2001 — more than half again as much as city officials had expected.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 16, 2002
The Internal Revenue Service has slapped the Housing Authority of Baltimore City with a federal tax lien, alleging the agency owes more than $626,000 in payroll taxes. Officials at the housing authority, however, say the IRS is mistaken and that no back taxes are owed. Housing officials have been trying without success to reach the IRS for an explanation for a week since learning about the lien from a reporter. The document was filed in Baltimore Circuit Court on Oct. 9. Rainbow Lin, chief financial officer for HABC, has reviewed the authority's financial records and believes they are in order, said Melvin Edwards, housing spokesman.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | June 2, 1993
Yesterday's sweep of a decrepit high-rise in the Flag House Courts complex was inspired by the Chicago Housing Authority, which has cleaned out 170 public housing buildings over the past five years, purging them of trash and drug dealers.Baltimore's two months of planning also took 10 city housing officials to Chicago to see how the experts do it.At the invitation of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Baltimore housing employees flew to Chicago for a three-day training session by Chicago housing officials.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2011
State and local officials joined Shaun Donovan, the nation's top housing official, on a tour Friday of construction efforts that they hope will give residents of a blighted corner of West Baltimore affordable and environmentally minded housing. The development, which aims to renovate or build 111 low-income apartments by the end of this year, is in the Poppleton neighborhood, where boarded-up buildings sit alongside tidy, well-kept homes. The Department of Housing and Urban Development provided $1.5 million of federal stimulus funding to outfit apartments in the development with features that include double-pane windows, cabinets free of formaldehyde and energy-efficient appliances.
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