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Housing Market

BUSINESS
December 17, 1990
This weekly feature offers questions answered by newsworthy business leaders. George Shehan, a partner with American Landmark Homes, a land development and home building company in Harford County, recently was elected president of the Home Builders Association of Maryland.Q.Everyday we hear about the problems in the housing industry. How bad are things in the Baltimore area?A.Well, I think Baltimore hasn't experienced the peaks and valleys that many other jurisdictions have gone through like Houston and now the New England area.
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BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 24, 2006
Sales of existing homes in the United States unexpectedly surged in February after falling for five months in a row, the National Association of Realtors reported yesterday, reflecting a lift related to unseasonably warm weather and signaling that the housing market is healthier than some experts had suggested. Sales climbed 5.2 percent last month, to an annual pace of 6.91 million homes, after falling 8.9 percent in the previous five months. The nationwide median price -- the point at which half the homes sold for more and half for less -- climbed 10.6 percent from a year earlier, to $209,000.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2012
David D. Igla lost out on three Ellicott City homes in the past few months before he finally beat the competition and had an offer accepted. What kind of so-called buyer's market is this, he wondered? Some houses zip off the market — occasionally above asking price — while others languish because the price isn't right, the home isn't updated or other aspects of the property don't appeal. The result: plenty of frustrated buyers and sellers. Welcome to the post-bubble, post-bust housing market.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
Even as the housing market recovers nationwide, echoes of the mortgage lending crisis continue to reverberate in Maryland, home to the nation's second-highest foreclosure rate last month. One in every 527 housing units in the state was touched by a foreclosure filing in March, the 21st consecutive month of year-over-year gains and the second highest rate in the country behind Florida, according to a monthly report by RealtyTrac, a California real estate firm. Meanwhile, median home prices in the Baltimore region remained flat, and distressed properties continued to make up an elevated share of sales, according to new reports on the regional housing market released Thursday.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2002
Any talk of a housing slowdown was dismissed as two prominent housing economists said the outlook for the rest of the year is bright for builders and real estate agents. "All the numbers we are seeing point to a good balance of housing supply and demand in most of the country," said David F. Seiders, chief economist for the National Association of Home Builders. "The economic and financial market environment in our forecasts should provide a solid foundation for the housing market in both 2002 and 2003," Seiders said.
BUSINESS
By James M. Woodard and James M. Woodard,Copley News Service | April 12, 1992
The current housing market is a lot like a sleepy bear, rising for the first time after spending the winter hibernating in its den.That old bear lumbers around the forest half-awake, looking for food. He's hungry and motivated for action, but still emerging from his seasonal stupor.It's spring, and the housing market also is awakening after a deep recessional sleep. Buyers and sellers are hungry for action.There's lots of pent-up demand to be satisfied. But it's not cresting into a sales boom period.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1999
The housing market was full of ups and downs in the third quarter as existing-home sales in most states were on the rise, while construction of new homes slowed across the country during the same period.The National Association of Realtors reports that total sales of existing homes rose in 38 states and the District of Columbia in the quarter, with the strongest increase coming in Vermont.Maryland was among nine states that recorded at least a double-digit increase in the third-quarter resale rate compared with 1998.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2001
Favorable mortgage interest rates, low unemployment and increasing consumer confidence across the nation will help keep housing markets strong for the rest of the year, the National Association of Realtors reported last week. David Lereah, NAR's chief economist, said the economy will improve in the second half of the year, but inflation will remain tame - a favorable backdrop for housing activity. "We expect the economy to gradually pick up steam during the second half of the year, yet inflation will remain tame.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1994
Despite harsh weather and rising interest rates, the Baltimore region's housing market grew stronger during the first three months of the year, signaling continuing improvement for the local economy, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development said in a report released yesterday.In a look at the national housing market compared with the first three months of 1993, HUD economists said home sales and construction have improved markedly, based on statistics gathered from state and local governments and housing industry sources in 10 regions.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1990
A new study shows that the Baltimore housing market held steady in the first half of the year.Single-family home sales dropped 1 percent from 19,551 in the first half of 1989 to 19,395 in the first six months of 1990, according to a report compiled by Rufus S. Lusk & Son Inc. Condominium sales rose 16 percent from 2,534 in the first half of 1989 to 2,936 during the period in 1990.Median sale prices of single-family homes in the area rose 3 percent from $117,905 in 1989 to $121,838. Condominium prices increased 8 percent from $84,042 to $91,165.
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