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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | October 19, 1992
The County Council will consider two resolutions tonight that will facilitate the construction of affordable housing for families buying their first homes.One resolution supports the dedication of 12 out of the 29 units at the Bonaventure North development in Odenton as affordable housing units. The other supports a plan County Executive Robert R. Neall announced last week to give 11 surplus lots to developers who will agree to build low cost housing on them.The Bonaventure North homes will sell for $93,500.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
It's growing increasingly difficult for the poorest families in Baltimore to find affordable rental housing, and some housing advocates worry new housing policies such as privatization could make the problem worse. An analysis by the Urban Institute found a yawning gap between the number of low-income renter households and affordable units available in every jurisdiction in the country. In Baltimore City in 2012, there were 43 affordable units available per 100 extremely low-income households, down from 58 in 2000, according to the study published last week.
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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson | January 22, 1992
Baltimore's housing authority yesterday unveiled a plan to demolish five crime-ridden public housing high-rises in East Baltimore and replace them with two-story buildings with fewer obstructed areas in which drug dealers can congregate.The plan targets Lafayette Courts, at 201 Aisquith St. The city is seeking about $58 million in federal money to implement the plan, which now needs the approval of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.The plans call for demolishing five of Lafayette Court's six high-rise buildings and replacing them with two-story low-rise buildings, in which each family would have a separate entrance to its apartment.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | June 11, 2006
Clutching the keys to her new home and surrounded by her children, Bonita Hall thanked a long list of volunteers who made homeownership a reality for her family. "Thank you all for blessing me with this house," said Hall, standing on the front porch of a modest rancher in a quiet Aberdeen neighborhood Friday. Less than a week ago, there was nothing but a hole in the ground surrounded by a muddy lot. Early Monday morning, all that a crew of about 50 had to work with was a foundation on an unimproved lot provided by Habitat for Humanity, a nonprofit organization that helps needy families achieve homeownership.
NEWS
July 21, 1995
"If you try to make economic sense of it, you won't," the executive director of Arundel Community Development Services Inc. warned Anne Arundel County Council members recently, when she briefed them on a $1.2 million plan to renovate 16 rental houses in a Galesville watermen's community.Nevertheless, Kathleen Koch insisted her non-profit organization could retain the character of the old African-American community along West Benning Road more cheaply than what it would cost to raze and rebuild it. The project's purpose isn't just historic or aesthetic: It is to create affordable, livable housing for families in South County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | February 14, 1999
Mission: To provide temporary housing for families of critically ill children being treated at Baltimore-area hospitals and to make grants available to other nonprofit programs in Maryland that help children reach their fullest potential. Grants are awarded with money generated by McDonald's. The Ronald McDonald House on Lexington Street, which opened in 1982, provides housing and support for an optional $10 daily donation to an average of 1,500 families annually. In addition to 39 bedrooms, the facility features a playroom, game room, fitness room, library with computers, children's media entertainment room, two large living rooms, six fully equipped kitchens, two large dining rooms, laundry facilities and an enclosed play yard.
NEWS
March 1, 1998
THE CITY Housing Authority is in the midst of a quiet revolution. Even as it keeps replacing antiquated high-rise complexes with suburban-type townhouses, it recognizes the federal gravy train is grinding to a halt. The question is how to turn the heavily subsidized Housing Authority into a profitable machine.Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III has some ideas. He has rented out roof space at 16 senior citizen towers to cellular telephone companies. He is trying to sell the audiovisual services of the Housing Authority-owned cable studio to private businesses.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson | January 22, 1992
Baltimore's housing authority wants to demolish five crime-ridden public housing high-rises in East Baltimore and replace them with two-story buildings with fewer obstructed areas in which drug dealers can congregate.The plan unveiled yesterday targets Lafayette Courts, at 201 Aisquith St. The city is seeking about $58 million in federal money to implement the plan, which now needs the approval of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.The plan calls for demolishing five of Lafayette Court's six high-rise buildings and replacing them with two-story low-rise buildings, in which each family would have a separate entrance to its apartment.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | April 7, 1991
At a groundbreaking ceremony in November 1961, Mayor J Harold Grady stood on the corner of Myrtle and George streets in West Baltimore, looked out over a neighborhood of ramshackle row houses and announced the construction of a public housing complex that would halt the spreading decay.George B. Murphy Homes -- with its modern 14-story towers -- would provide affordable, sanitary and safe housing to hundreds of poor families and stimulate private improvements throughout the area, he said.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1997
Plans to save five crumbling 19th-century alley houses near the B&O Railroad Museum are moving forward, with two local developers expressing interest in restoring the properties.However, funding has not been secured for renovation of the rowhouses, which were built for Irish immigrant railroad workers in the 1840s.Neighborhood activists are considering various ways of financing the project, including asking for a city loan that would be repaid after the houses are sold, said JoeAnne Whitely, a longtime area activist who is leading the preservation effort.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | March 12, 2006
Faced with growing problems spawned by soaring home prices, Howard County's housing authorities are planning a series of changes to programs for moderate-income buyers. Inflation has made low-income housing an impossibility, said Leonard S. Vaughan, the county housing director, and attendant costs such as higher property taxes and community association and condominium fees are crippling the county's efforts to provide moderate housing for families in the $35,000 to $60,000 income range.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 1999
"WHEN WE first learned of Arundel Habitat for Humanity, we didn't think we'd have a chance at a home. Then we were approved and our wait went by so very quickly. Now four wonderful congregations have made it possible for our beautiful home. How can we possibly say thank you to each and every one of you?"The heartfelt message, which appeared in recent bulletins of four churches, was signed by Brian and Sandie Adams and their children, Candice, Hunter and Andrew.The Adamses will see the dedication today of their new home -- one built through Habitat with help from the four congregations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | February 14, 1999
Mission: To provide temporary housing for families of critically ill children being treated at Baltimore-area hospitals and to make grants available to other nonprofit programs in Maryland that help children reach their fullest potential. Grants are awarded with money generated by McDonald's. The Ronald McDonald House on Lexington Street, which opened in 1982, provides housing and support for an optional $10 daily donation to an average of 1,500 families annually. In addition to 39 bedrooms, the facility features a playroom, game room, fitness room, library with computers, children's media entertainment room, two large living rooms, six fully equipped kitchens, two large dining rooms, laundry facilities and an enclosed play yard.
NEWS
January 6, 1999
Homeless, other poor still have difficulty finding $268 housingWhile in Baltimore recently, President Clinton announced Housing and Urban Development awards for homeless services ("President gets warm reception," Dec. 24).This was good news for Baltimore and the nation. For the first time in years, Congress approved increases for homeless programs. However, these funds will not begin to address the housing problems homeless people encounter. The need for affordable housing continues to exceed availability.
NEWS
March 1, 1998
THE CITY Housing Authority is in the midst of a quiet revolution. Even as it keeps replacing antiquated high-rise complexes with suburban-type townhouses, it recognizes the federal gravy train is grinding to a halt. The question is how to turn the heavily subsidized Housing Authority into a profitable machine.Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III has some ideas. He has rented out roof space at 16 senior citizen towers to cellular telephone companies. He is trying to sell the audiovisual services of the Housing Authority-owned cable studio to private businesses.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1997
Plans to save five crumbling 19th-century alley houses near the B&O Railroad Museum are moving forward, with two local developers expressing interest in restoring the properties.However, funding has not been secured for renovation of the rowhouses, which were built for Irish immigrant railroad workers in the 1840s.Neighborhood activists are considering various ways of financing the project, including asking for a city loan that would be repaid after the houses are sold, said JoeAnne Whitely, a longtime area activist who is leading the preservation effort.
NEWS
By James Bock | October 11, 1991
Cordine Irby got on a waiting list for subsidized housing in 1979, when Jimmy Carter was president. This week, unable to find a low-cost apartment, having worn out her welcome with relatives and still on the waiting list, she moved into a homeless shelter with her 4-year-old daughter.Charles I. Brown has passed by the abandoned hulk of the American Brewery on North Gay Street nearly every day for 13 years. He considers it Eyesore No. 1 in an East Baltimore neighborhood full of eyesores, but the money isn't yet in hand to fix it up.Robert Green has taken his quest for housing literally into his own hands.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1997
Morgan State University bestowed its distinguished alumni award on a Sykesville preacher who sent children and grandchildren to the Baltimore school he never attended.The reason for the award, the first to a nongraduate, is the Schoolhouse Road Project, 26 modest townhouses just beyond the honoree's yard. The Rev. Ernest F. Johnson, 78, has only to look out his window to see why Morgan commended him "for being relentless in the struggle for equality, justice and decent housing for black families in Carroll County."
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