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Housing Discrimination

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BUSINESS
Yvonne Wenger | May 7, 2012
A survey of 549 community-based organizations suggests that housing discrimination is on the rise, particularly targeting disabled individuals, immigrants, minorities and families with children, according to the nonprofit Consumer Action . Locally, Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. has said it found similar problems. The organizations, which has sent “testers” out in the region to inquire about available housing, filed suit last year and in 2010 over alleged discrimination.
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NEWS
November 14, 2013
The Sun and other media outlets around the nation have recently covered claims of plagiarism by U.S. Sen. Rand Paul ("Don't copy, don't tell lies," Nov. 8). While the senator has conceded to prolific plagiarism, at least by some on his staff, the real reason for concern is less with the originality of words the senator claimed as his own than about the ideas expressed. Commenting on the Supreme Court's decision upholding the Affordable Care Act, Senator Paul said, "Just because a couple people on the Supreme Court declare something to be 'constitutional' does not make it so. " I am not sure how the senator defines "a couple," but in the Supreme Court decision he refers to a majority of five justices voted to uphold the health care law enacted by Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2011
For the second time in less than a year, a fair-housing advocacy organization has filed suit in U.S. District Court claiming racial discrimination by a company that owns 24 apartment complexes in the Baltimore region. Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. is suing the national company Home Properties, claiming that in December and March, agents at Fox Hall Apartments in Nottingham showed more apartments and offered a lower price to white than black "testers" sent to check rental practices at the eastern Baltimore County complex.
NEWS
Bob Ehrlich | August 25, 2013
There are so many things to say with regard to the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development's proposed rule entitled "Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing. " And since this proposal lands on the hot buttons of race and class, I'm going to ask all of you to take a deep breath, put aside your preconceptions about federal housing policy for a minute, and simply give some objective thought to the size and scope of this latest missive from Washington, D.C. First, it is worthwhile to revisit a historical fact: Discriminatory housing practices were predominant in this country for a very long time.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | July 15, 1994
The county Office of Human Rights has rejected a Catonsville woman's allegations that the managers of a Columbia condominium denied her use of her home by using lawn care and other chemicals to which she is allergic.The decision, in which the county agency ruled there was not enough evidence to pursue a housing discrimination case, was the second defeat Ivy Lurie Bormel has sustained in her efforts to get a discrimination ruling based on her disability, known medically as multiple chemical sensitivity.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Same-sex couples are discriminated against when searching for housing in online rental markets across the country, according to a new U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development study released Tuesday. In states like Maryland where such discrimination is illegal, the discrimination is even more pronounced , the study noted. The HUD study, described by the federal agency as "the first-ever national study examining housing discrimination against same-sex couples in the private rental market," involved the authors sending 7,000 emails to housing providers, allegedly from prospective heterosexual and same-sex couples, and then comparing the responses received.
BUSINESS
By David I. Turner and David I. Turner,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 29, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- When it comes to housing discrimination, Realtors say they've gone from being part of the problem to being part of the solution.Years ago, real estate salespeople would typically follow the wishes of the neighborhoods, steering some racial groups away from buying homes in certain areas while encouraging others.Then came federal fair-housing laws, and state and local statutes designed to halt housing discrimination.Slowly, practices began to change, though no one, not even the Realtors, will tell you that everyone today strictly adheres to those laws.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1998
The National Association of Realtors and the Department of Housing and Urban Development have devised a program to better educate Realtors about fair housing and housing discrimination.The course complements the "Many Neighborhoods -- One America" campaign that was launched this month in conjunction with the 30th anniversary of the Fair Housing Law of the Civil Rights Act of 1968.The course is designed to teach real estate professionals to better understand the law. When Realtors complete the course, they will receive a certificate and will be allowed to use a new "One America" mark in their ads.The Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors, the nation's oldest real estate board, said that for the remainder of the year the organization will be involved with many outreach programs, according to President Gilbert D. Marsiglia.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | April 17, 1992
A federal judge has ordered a prominent Glen Burnie developer to pay$10,000 in damages to a program for the mentally ill that won a housing discrimination suit against him.U.S. District Judge Marvin J.Garbis also told developer Frank J. Scott to pay legal fees stemmingfrom the suit over 12 two-bedroom condominiums in Cromwell Fountain,a 900-unit complex under construction off New Ordnance Road.The judge ruled in June that Scott had violated fair housing lawsby canceling a $1.4 million sales agreement with Omni House, a rehabilitation program for mentally ill people.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | January 26, 1991
Bethesda developer and Maryland Democratic Party Chairman Nathan Landow and his business, Landow and Co., were found in violation yesterday of an agreement with the Fair Housing Commission of Greater Washington but cleared of allegations that they had violated federal fair housing and civil rights laws.U.S. District Court Judge Marvin Garbis found that Mr. Landow and his company "did not comply in virtually every area" of a binding out-of-court agreement struck after the developer and his company were charged with housing discrimination in August 1987.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Same-sex couples are discriminated against when searching for housing in online rental markets across the country, according to a new U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development study released Tuesday. In states like Maryland where such discrimination is illegal, the discrimination is even more pronounced , the study noted. The HUD study, described by the federal agency as "the first-ever national study examining housing discrimination against same-sex couples in the private rental market," involved the authors sending 7,000 emails to housing providers, allegedly from prospective heterosexual and same-sex couples, and then comparing the responses received.
NEWS
May 6, 2013
In her April 23 column, “Forcing landlords to accept vouchers won't help the poor,” Marta H. Mossburg quoted me as saying that laws prohibiting landlords to accept Section 8 vouchers “exacerbate” the problem of finding housing for the poor. That's wrong. When Ms. Mossburg interviewed me for her column, I was clear: banning housing discrimination based on source of income will help increase housing options for the poor. I told her about fieldwork I've done with families in Baltimore; Mobile, Ala.; and New Haven, Stamford and Norwalk, Conn., where I repeatedly heard about landlords refusing to rent to parents who were trying to secure housing.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
A U.S. District Court judge has approved a settlement in a Baltimore fair housing case dating back to 1995. The case arose when the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland on behalf of public housing residents sued HUD, saying that it demolished old public housing high-rises where mostly African-Americans lived and then moved residents to equally segregated housing and poor conditions in other parts of the city. Under the settlement, HUD will continue a program established in an earlier part of the case that moves families to mixed-income neighborhoods throughout the region.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
The National Fair Housing Alliance and Paralyzed Veterans of America announced Wednesday that they have settled a federal housing discrimination suit against a Virginia real estate developer. The groups claimed HHHunt Corp. built several apartment complexes, including one in Maryland, without respect for accessibility requirements. HHHunt will make the complexes accessible within the next three years and has agreed to pay its opponents' attorneys' fees, according to a statement from the groups.
BUSINESS
Yvonne Wenger | May 7, 2012
A survey of 549 community-based organizations suggests that housing discrimination is on the rise, particularly targeting disabled individuals, immigrants, minorities and families with children, according to the nonprofit Consumer Action . Locally, Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. has said it found similar problems. The organizations, which has sent “testers” out in the region to inquire about available housing, filed suit last year and in 2010 over alleged discrimination.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2011
For the second time in less than a year, a fair-housing advocacy organization has filed suit in U.S. District Court claiming racial discrimination by a company that owns 24 apartment complexes in the Baltimore region. Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. is suing the national company Home Properties, claiming that in December and March, agents at Fox Hall Apartments in Nottingham showed more apartments and offered a lower price to white than black "testers" sent to check rental practices at the eastern Baltimore County complex.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | April 23, 1991
Omni House and one of its mentally disabled clients charged a Glen Burnie developer yesterday with housing discrimination.Cromwell Fountain Associates canceled the sale of 12 apartments to the mental-health care provider earlier this month, according to a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.In their suit, Omni House and James G., who would have lived in one of the apartments, said the cancellation violated federal fair housing law.They have asked the court to prevent Cromwell Fountain Associates from selling the 12 units to anyone else until the Glen Burnie-based, non-profit rehabilitation organization for the mentally ill can plead its case.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 24, 2004
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development awarded grants yesterday to two Baltimore nonprofit groups to fight housing discrimination in the city and outlying counties. Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. received $182,468 to investigate housing practices regarding the sale and rental of properties in the city as well as in Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Frederick, Harford, Howard and Washington counties. Joe Coffey, BNI executive director, said that until the late 1990s about 80 percent of the organization's complaints of housing discrimination came from Baltimore City and Baltimore County.
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