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NEWS
November 4, 2001
WHAT'S to dislike about a law that seems to increase open space in housing developments and to promote the higher-density housing that Smart Growth advocates love? Plenty, since the new zoning ordinance adopted by Carroll County commissioners aims to increase the number of new houses that can be built and encourages costly leap-frog development. This in a county hard-pressed to provide adequate public services for existing housing. Plus, Commissioners Donald Dell and Robin Frazier sneaked through the measure with scant public input after a panel of landowners and real estate people concocted the ambiguously worded scheme.
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NEWS
July 9, 2013
Tomorrow City Councilman Carl Stokes plans to hold a hearing on a resolution calling on the developers of the tony Harbor Point project on Baltimore's waterfront to invest at least $15.6 million into the nearby Perkins Homes public housing development. It gets at a vital issue - whether tax incentives for downtown development benefit the city's poor residents - but does so by means of a number of misconceptions. Mr. Stokes has been a strong critic of the use of tax incentives for the construction of Harbor Point, and although we do not have a philosophical objection to such deals, we appreciate his diligence in the matter.
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BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and By Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | June 24, 2001
Stephen J. Ferrandi is in an enviable position: He's got the gold - and he knows it. The gold in this case are the large land parcels the real estate agent is selling for 25 clients. Typically, his clients are farmers who are selling land that's been in their families for generations. And its Ferrandi's job in the Columbia office of KLNB Inc., a commercial real estate brokerage, to find a developer with the deepest pockets possible. But in an era of high builder demand and short land supply, even Ferrandi has trouble comprehending the dollars being thrown at ever scarcer properties suitable for housing developments.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
Construction began Tuesday on a housing development in the Greenspring neighborhood of northwest Baltimore for limited-income seniors. Renaissance Gardens will be a 60-unit independent living complex in the 4300 block of Pimlico Road. The complex will be four stories and all units will have one bedroom. There will be several common areas, including a multipurpose dining room, a living room, a computer room and an activities room. Some on-site health and social services will be offered for residents.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1995
Baltimore won a $22.7 million federal grant yesterday to tear down and transform Lexington Terrace, a decrepit high-rise housing project that looms over the western edge of downtown.After two years of extensive planning and lobbying by tenants, community leaders and city officials, Baltimore prevailed in obtaining the critical federal support for a proposed $86 million overhaul of Lexington Terrace, one of its worst public housing developments.A worn, half-vacant complex of five towers and 23 low-rise buildings less than a mile from the Inner Harbor, Lexington Terrace has long been beset by crime, drugs and deteriorating conditions.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2003
WHATEVER THE outcome of the trial in U.S. District Court on discrimination claims by public housing residents against the city and the federal government, the case has provided a fascinating look at the early development of low-income housing here -- and of Baltimore's inner city as well. The view comes courtesy of the reports and testimony of expert witnesses for both sides. The experts, like the plaintiffs and the defense, disagree on whether the city and the federal government have willfully perpetuated in recent times the racially segregated system they put in place six decades ago. But there is little dispute about how public housing developed in the years before the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court decision outlawed racial segregation -- and little doubt that the development influenced patterns of growth for years.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | November 7, 1991
In an article yesterday in The Sun, reasons that many students are truant in Baltimore schools were incorrectly attributed to a school system official. In fact, the information was provided by officials at the city Housing Authority.The Sun regrets the error.Baltimore school system officials yesterday announced the start of an effort to combat its escalating truancy rate, already the highest in the state.The $256,000 program, funded by federal housing dollars, will target students who live in six of the city's public housing developments, where more than 30 percent of 10,500 school-age children are chronically truant -- meaning they miss more than 36 days of classes a year.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | April 20, 2012
Editor: I am a resident of Harford County who has just finished reading the article "Harford County officials push for county business loan fund," in your April 13 edition. You quoted Economic Development Director [Jim] Richardson, as saying that Harford County could be the, "New Silicon Valley. " Other than the fact that a handful of developers and politicians would make a ton of money, why in the world would anyone want to transform a beautiful county into a network of congested roads, shopping centers, office buildings, housing developments, higher crime rate, overcrowded schools and probably higher taxes!
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | September 21, 1990
In order to absorb an expected budget shortfall, the Baltimore Housing Authority plans to eliminate the daytime shift of security personnel who monitor the doorways in 18 public housing high-rises and is likely to lay off some of its 1,500 workers."
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2011
Staking out one of his legislative priorities in this year's General Assembly, Gov. Martin O'Malley argued Monday that rural development using septic systems needs to be curtailed to help clean up the Chesapeake Bay and to preserve the state's remaining farmland from suburban sprawl. O'Malley joined with environmental activists and green-leaning lawmakers to defend the bill he has introduced, which would ban any new major housing projects on septic. It also would require less-polluting but more costly septic systems on smaller housing developments or individual homes not affected by the ban. The governor said he wanted to end a "proliferation" of new housing on septic systems, which allow up to 10 times as much water-fouling nitrogen to leach into streams per household as do homes hooked up to public sewage treatment plants.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | April 20, 2012
Editor: I am a resident of Harford County who has just finished reading the article "Harford County officials push for county business loan fund," in your April 13 edition. You quoted Economic Development Director [Jim] Richardson, as saying that Harford County could be the, "New Silicon Valley. " Other than the fact that a handful of developers and politicians would make a ton of money, why in the world would anyone want to transform a beautiful county into a network of congested roads, shopping centers, office buildings, housing developments, higher crime rate, overcrowded schools and probably higher taxes!
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2012
Plans for two Baltimore County senior housing developments, one of which is tied to the expansion of the Catonsville Family Y, are set to move forward this week. County Councilman Tom Quirk said he plans to introduce resolutions Monday seeking council approval for the projects. The senior housing developments would be located at the Y campus on Rolling Road in Catonsville and on Oak Road in Baltimore Highlands, which is near Lansdowne. The developers of the projects have applied for Planned Unit Development (PUD)
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2011
The developer of a planned affordable-housing community in Glen Burnie will start construction on the project next month, after the Anne Arundel County Council voted to grant the company a key tax break on the project. The council's 4-3 vote on the tax break for New York-based Conifer Realty allows the 36-unit project to move forward, despite complaints from residents who said the development has the potential to bring more crime to the area and decrease property values. Those assertions were voiced by County Councilman John J. Grasso, who represents the Glen Burnie area and has said it already has an abundant stock of low-income housing.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
The fate of a proposed affordable housing community in Glen Burnie is in limbo after an Anne Arundel County Council vote to delay a proposed tax break that the project's developer says it needs to move forward. Councilman John J. Grasso, a Glen Burnie Republican whose district includes the planned Marley Meadows development, pushed for the delay, which was unanimously approved by the council Monday. Members will now vote on the $5,000 annual tax break at a Nov. 21 meeting, a timeline that officials said could potentially derail the controversial project.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
In its first major project planned for downtown Columbia since emerging from bankruptcy last November, the town's master developer has proposed building up to 817 residences and 70,000 square feet of retail space. The Howard Hughes Corp., which controls much of the land once held by the Rouse Co., says the as-yet-unnamed project next to The Mall in Columbia is being designed to attract young professionals and others who work nearby. Robert Jenkins, vice president of engineering for Howard Hughes, said his company chose the site for its first downtown project because it has "major infrastructure" already in place, including water and sewer service, and is centrally located and within easy walking distance of restaurants, stores and other amenities.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
A city-owned inn in Midtown-Belvedere has been sold to a private developer with plans to convert the property into a boutique hotel, according to the city's economic development entity. The corporate buyer agreed to pay $725,000 for the Inn at Government House, a three-building complex that was converted under then-Mayor William Donald Schaefer, said Darrell Doan, the Baltimore Development Corp.'s director of economic development for the eastern half of the city. Mount Vernon Mansion LLC, the purchasing company, is led by Eddie Brown of the Baltimore investment firm Brown Capital Management and Martin Azola of real estate developer Azola & Associates.
NEWS
May 11, 1993
When the public housing program was created by Congress in 1937, its aim was to provide temporary living arrangements for Americans down on their luck due to the lingering Depression. Over the past half-century, public housing has ceased to be a stop-gap measure. It is now a fixture of big-city living, a symbol of the nation's constant -- and worsening -- urban crisis.In his 1991 book, "The Promised Land," Nicholas Lemann charted the great black migration to the North in the 1940s and how it changed America.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 21, 1992
The Schmoke administration has selected A & R Development Corp. over three other developers to build a $2.4 million apartment complex on a city-owned tract at 4021-4041 Frederick Ave. in Irvington, said Robert Hearn, the Baltimore housing commissioner.A & R's plan calls for 41 apartments for low-and moderate-income elderly residents. Construction will begin in mid-1993 and end in early 1994. The three-story building will contain six efficiencies and 35 one-bedroom apartments, with rents ranging from $258 to $290.
NEWS
June 16, 2011
Over 90 percent of the proposed housing developments in Maryland have gone bankrupt over the last five years; now you can add Thistle Landing to the list ("More of the same," June 12). It's a shame you have once again attacked a proposed housing development. And how dare you imply that owners and elected officials are unethical and trying to sneak around the rules. Remember, you cannot sell a home for what it costs to build anywhere in Maryland. With newspapers like yours who would want to?
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2011
Staking out one of his legislative priorities in this year's General Assembly, Gov. Martin O'Malley argued Monday that rural development using septic systems needs to be curtailed to help clean up the Chesapeake Bay and to preserve the state's remaining farmland from suburban sprawl. O'Malley joined with environmental activists and green-leaning lawmakers to defend the bill he has introduced, which would ban any new major housing projects on septic. It also would require less-polluting but more costly septic systems on smaller housing developments or individual homes not affected by the ban. The governor said he wanted to end a "proliferation" of new housing on septic systems, which allow up to 10 times as much water-fouling nitrogen to leach into streams per household as do homes hooked up to public sewage treatment plants.
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