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NEWS
April 6, 2011
Baltimore's new inspector general clearly has his work cut out for him. David McClintock, who was hired by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake about a year ago, reported this week that an assistant superintendent of housing inspections had been convicted of multiple counts of theft in his previous job with the state Department of Corrections and, when he submitted himself to a background check 18 months after taking his job with the city, he lied on the...
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NEWS
April 14, 2014
Michael Hankin's comments on the new street sweeping program that has now been initiated in Baltimore are very much appreciated, but the effort will not turn out to be the panacea for the trash problem in city that he suggests ( "A clean sweep," April 7). The view that cooperation rather than enforcement is the best way to clean our Inner Harbor of trash leaves a lot to be desired. His assumption is that most of the trash is on the streets of Baltimore and that street sweeping will be the factor that reduces trash going into the Harbor.
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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1998
A pending federal investigation is not slowing Baltimore's Housing and Community Development Department, which yesterday announced its plans to step up initiatives ranging from housing inspection crackdowns to increased demolitions.In a regularly scheduled news conference, Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III said the city has more than quadrupled the number of inspection violations prosecuted in court during the past six months.In October, the city took 84 city property owners to court for code violations.
NEWS
Baltimore Sun staff | September 25, 2013
A day after beginning demolition of three vacant blocks in East Baltimore, city housing officials say they will work with the residents of the only inhabited home to potentially allow them to stay. The housing department had said it planned to knock down the homes on the 1600 block of N. Bethel St. as part of a demolition that began Tuesday with adjacent Lansing Avenue . The effort is part of a broader revitalization plan for the area. Ralph Gatheright, 74, lives in the only house not boarded up on Lansing or his stretch of Bethel, and said he was not aware of the city's intention for his home.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2002
Legislative auditors have asked state and federal authorities to investigate "a significant number of questionable property sales transactions" by Maryland's housing department. The highly critical, 34-page audit focuses on the sale of houses the state acquired after owners defaulted on government-backed mortgage loans. The report found that "numerous properties were sold at significant discounts from the assessed value." In one case, a house the state sold for $5,000 was resold the same day for $57,500.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1999
Baltimore's housing department is teaming with Bea Gaddy, advocate for the city's poor, to open an emergency homeless shelter for women and children.Daniel P. Henson III, city commissioner for Housing and Community Development, announced yesterday that a city neighborhood services center at 1901 Pennsylvania Ave. will use its gymnasium to create temporary shelter for the homeless through the winter.Henson welcomed the partnership with Gaddy, who will direct needy women and children to the site, which can handle about 40 people per night.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2002
Kenneth Strong, director of research for a nonprofit law center in Baltimore devoted to helping community organizations, started a new job with the city yesterday as director of the office of homeownership. Strong, who will try to encourage homeownership through loan programs and promotional efforts to persuade more people to live in the city, was one of five housing department hires announced during a news conference yesterday at City Hall. Other incoming housing officials introduced by the mayor yesterday included Douglass Austin, deputy commissioner for development; J. Gregory Love, deputy commissioner for housing and building code enforcement; Ruth Louie, assistant commissioner for community development; and Chris Shea, associate deputy director of planning and development.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1997
Federal housing officials have uncovered administrative problems at the city's Department of Housing, requiring the city to refund $6.2 million in federal block grant funds.In an in-depth audit, city housing officials were faulted for using improper accounting procedures and poor recordkeeping for some programs.The Inspector General's Office of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development conducted the audit at the request of the Baltimore HUD office after numerous disagreements with city officials over financial issues, said Jim Kelly, spokesman for the local HUD office.
NEWS
February 21, 1996
THE REAPPOINTMENT of Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III should not be confirmed until the mayor investigates incidents in which certain housing officials have ignored the very laws the public entrusts them to uphold.Conflicts of interest are bound to arise when city policy allows these officials to own slum dwellings that their own department is supposed to inspect. But when they also ignore or quash citations to repair these properties, this is an abuse of power that demands an outside investigation by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2010
Baltimore's housing department has revoked the license of a publicly subsidized Reservoir Hill apartment complex, a move that could lead to residents of the 200 units being forced out. In their ruling, housing officials cited a deeply entrenched drug network and a history of violence at the Madison Park North Apartments. The owners of the North Avenue complex "knew or should have known that the premises were being used … for drug-trafficking and failed to prevent them from being so used," officials wrote.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2013
When the state Department of Housing and Community Development's 380 employees pack up and move from Crownsville to New Carrollton in 2015, fewer women will work out on their lunch break at Curves. It also may mean fewer people getting their cars repaired, having their dry cleaning done or picking up lunch at local businesses along Generals Highway. "It's going to hurt our local economy," said Jodi Kubisiak, manager of Curves, less than a mile from the housing department's office.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and officials from the Department of Housing and Community Development on Thursday awarded $6.2 million from the national mortgage settlement to nine legal aid groups in order to expand the availability of low-cost and pro bono legal services to Maryland homeowners facing foreclosure. Recently, DHCD has been setting aside about $1 milllion per year for foreclosure legal services, so the settlement funds greatly expand available financing, said Carol A. Gilbert, a DHCD assistant secretary.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
Kim Washington, a top aide to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Baltimore's chief lobbyist, will leave her post early in the coming General Assembly session, city officials announced Monday. Washington, a friend of Rawlings-Blake's since childhood, will take a post in the city housing department, where she worked previously. Del. Curt Anderson, head of the city's House delegation in Annapolis, said Washington informed him over the weekend that she would be leaving in early February.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2012
Baltimore's Department of Housing and Community Development has waived the affordable-housing requirement for the Lexington Square "Superblock" project, a development discussed Thursday at a meeting of the City Council's Taxation, Finance and Economic Development Committee. The housing department does not have the $9.5 million needed to subsidize the construction of 59 affordable apartments in the mixed-use development slated for the intersection of Lexington and Howard streets, according to a memo from Baltimore Housing Commissioner Paul Graziano.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
The man insisted he didn't illegally dump the toilet by the side of the road. No, he just left it there as a favor for "Moe," a homeless guy who planned to put it to use in a vacant house somewhere. "That was his story," said city housing official Thomas Waugh. At least, that was the man's story after one of the city housing department's surveillance cameras caught him ditching the commode along a Southwest Baltimore street. Waugh didn't believe the excuse for a second, and even if he had, dropping off a toilet would still qualify as littering.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
The Baltimore housing department received a $2.9 million federal grant Friday to clean up poisonous lead paint found in the walls of thousands of city buildings. Baltimore will receive $2.9 million from the federal government to fix lead-paint hazards in more than 200 homes, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Friday — a vote of confidence in the city's efforts to resolve past problems with its abatement program. "It's a tremendous boost to our work in protecting children from lead-paint poisoning," said Ken Strong, an assistant city housing commissioner who began overseeing the program last year after Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake moved it from the health department to the housing agency.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | February 8, 2007
It was cold - really cold - as Marvin Briscoe and Valerie McKeever and a team of city housing department employees fanned out across a swath of Park Heights yesterday in the icy morning air, the wind whipping up snow around them. But their clients, they assumed, were colder. Death Traffic fatality in Harford might be linked to snow.pg 3b
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1998
City Council members are considering a proposal to give the city's liquor board the authority to license and regulate strip parlors and adult video stores.Council President Lawrence A. Bell III introduced the legislation at last night's meeting on behalf of the city Department of Housing and Community Development, which controls licensing of adult entertainment parlors.Articles last year by The Sun revealed that the housing department had failed to enforce the laws.Undercover police officers cited dancers for prostitution, topless dancing, obscene stage acts, pressuring customers to buy drinks and other infractions.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2012
So it comes to this: The sheriff's office tagging vehicles that belong to the Baltimore Housing Authority, preparing them for seizure and auction. Like some common deadbeat, an actual governmental agency gets what is essentially a visit from the repo man. This would be a pretty astonishing turn of events, except that it's also an inevitable one for the public housing authority. For years, the agency has practiced a policy of delay, denial and, ultimately, defiance when it comes to taking responsibility for the children who were poisoned by lead while growing up in public housing units.
NEWS
December 30, 2011
What accounts for the unfairly sensational tone of your recent article on Baltimore City's legitimate - and sensible - use of affordable housing funds to demolish vacant eyesores ("City 'affordable housing' fund destroys more houses than it builds," Dec. 26)? Didn't The Sun take Housing Commissioner Paul Graziano to task just six months ago for overspending on affordable housing units in Johnston Square? Johnston Square should have taught us that government bureaucracies are not well-suited to meeting the complicated economic and logistical challenges of developing new housing, affordable or otherwise.
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