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NEWS
By Bob Dart and Bob Dart,Cox News Service Kathleen Beeman of The Sun's Washington bureau contributed to this article | July 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Red tape and restrictive zoning have put the American dream of a house in the suburbs out of reach of millions of families, a presidential panel reported yesterday.Not only are the working poor economically excluded, but many suburban communities "end up as homogeneous enclaves where households such as schoolteachers, firefighters, young families and the elderly on fixed incomes are all regulated out," the report said.The report blamed excessive local regulations for adding up to 35 percent to the price of a new house.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times | July 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Saying that zoning laws and other restrictions add as much as 35 percent to the cost of an American house, a presidential commission calls unnecessary regulation one of the chief barriers to affordable housing.The commission proposes denying federal housing money to state and local governments that ignore its recommendations. Its report was to be released in a White House ceremony today, indicating that it has the support of President Bush.While the report examines a wide range of regulatory barriers, its main criticisms are focused on suburbs that use zoning and building codes to keep out the less wealthy.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Evening Sun Staff | June 10, 1991
Poor residents in the Baltimore metropolitan area face a severe shortage of affordable housing as their incomes fail to keep up with sharply rising housing costs and cutbacks in federal housing subsidies, according to a report released today.The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in Washington says in a study that four in five poor households in the Baltimore area pay more of their income for housing than the federal government considers affordable for them.The study found that the average monthly rent for a modest two-bedroom apartment is $141 more than the average welfare household receives in monthly assistance.
NEWS
By Gary Gately | December 4, 1990
As more elderly people grow too frail to maintain homes and find they need help with daily tasks, group "sheltered homes" can provide a less costly alternative to nursing homes. Licensed operators of such homes provide independent living with 24-hour monitoring, congregate meals, housekeeping and help with daily tasks like eating, bathing, grooming or using the bathroom.Any home with at least four but fewer than 12 unrelated elderly residents can be certified by the Maryland Office on Aging as sheltered housing, provided the home meets state requirements.
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