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By AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 15, 2011
After more than three years of a Depression-era like performance, home building in Harford County is slowly showing some signs of revival. Midway through 2011, more permits have been issued to construct new single family homes than at a similar point in either of the previous three years, according to the June permit report from the county government. In addition, the county has issued permits for more new housing units of all types in six months than it did in all of 2010.
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NEWS
December 28, 2013
During the last recession, more than 90 million people - a third of the nation's population - saw their incomes fall below 200 percent of the federal poverty line, or about $46,000 a year for a family of four. Many of those individuals and families have never recovered, and as a result states across the country are now facing what U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan calls "the worst rental affordability crisis that this country has known" as rising rents threaten millions of Americans with homelessness.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 18, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Housing construction unexpectedly declined in August as builders started projects at the slowest pace this year, government figures yesterday showed.Housing starts fell 4.8 percent last month to an annual rate of 1.363 million, the Commerce Department said in a report suggesting that a decline in mortgage rates has yet to rekindle demand. Permits for new construction also dropped, and July's total of new starts was revised lower, showing a decline of nearly 5 percent.The report showed all regions of the United States reporting fewer starts, with the Northeast accounting for the greatest decline.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2012
The City Arts Apartments are full of artists who live and work in the Baltimore complex, built on what long had been a vacant lot in a very vacant neighborhood. But a sudden gap in its development financing almost kept the project from getting off the ground. The $2.5 million hole was dug by the financial crisis, which pummeled the value of tax credits that many affordable-housing projects rely on. The post-crisis landscape for community development is shaping up to be even more challenging.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2003
ELKTON - During a moment of suspense, all eyes in the crowded hearing room turned to Mark H. Guns, the young member of the Cecil County Board of Commissioners. The 43-year-old lawmaker held the deciding vote on one of the hottest issues in the county in recent years: a bill that would impose a six-month moratorium on housing construction in about 63 percent of the county. The four other members of the board were evenly divided on the legislation proposed by Commissioner William C. Manlove with hopes of preventing an onslaught of new development projects making their way into the system as the county prepares to review its long-term growth plan.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2003
RISING SUN - Cecil County commissioners have rejected a controversial legislative proposal that would have halted preliminary approval for new housing units in more than half the county for a period of six months. By a vote of 3-2 the commissioners killed a bill that its sponsor said would have stopped the paperwork leading up to housing construction while a newly appointed 11-member comprehensive review committee examined the county's long-term growth plan. William C. Manlove, the bill's author, said it was designed to prevent a flurry of new home construction plans from being filed with the county while the review committee did its work.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1995
White Marsh growth gaining on Owings MillsWhite Marsh is catching up with Owings Mills as the hub of new housing construction in Baltimore County, according to real estate consultants Lipman Frizzell & Mitchell.After peaking at a 34.8 percent market share in 1994, the Owings Mills growth area's production of new housing represents 26.6 percent of residential building permits in the county.White Marsh housing production, which made up an average of 11.7 percent of the Baltimore County market over the past five years, shot up over the first five months of 1995.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2003
Dion F. Guthrie, the Harford County councilman who is credited with initiating a citizen's movement against crowding in public schools, wants homebuyers and builders to help pay for new school construction. Guthrie, the lone Democrat on the council, suggests that the county increase the transfer tax on the purchase of new and existing homes from 1 percent to 1.5 percent. He wants the estimated $6 million in revenue that the move would generate to be used for school construction. He also wants builders to pay a filing fee on permits of 1 percent of the gross value of a proposed house or development.
NEWS
August 1, 2000
A COUNTY'S "General Plan" may not compete with John Grisham as summertime beach blanket reading. But the document will have a lot more importance than any courtroom potboiler. And, in September, the Howard County Council will meet again to consider the document that will lay out directions for at least the next 10 years. In a sense, this exercise is designed to foresee and to shape the future. The planning occurs amid heightened concerns about growth, money to provide for it and the quality of life.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 21, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Housing construction rebounded in January, business activity in mid-Atlantic states perked up this month, and labor markets remain robust -- the latest signs of clear sailing for the U.S. economy as it enters its seventh straight year of growth."
EXPLORE
September 12, 2012
Developer Jackson-Shaw has started the next stage of residential development at Brickyard Station, a 63-acre transit-oriented community in Beltsville and Laurel. JLB Partners purchased land to construct 433 multifamily units, with completion expected in fall 2013, and Ryland Homes is starting construction on model homes prior to developing more than 400 single-family homes and townhomes in the community. Both projects represent a combined investment of $200 million for Brickyard Station, Jackson-Shaw officials said.
EXPLORE
By AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 15, 2011
After more than three years of a Depression-era like performance, home building in Harford County is slowly showing some signs of revival. Midway through 2011, more permits have been issued to construct new single family homes than at a similar point in either of the previous three years, according to the June permit report from the county government. In addition, the county has issued permits for more new housing units of all types in six months than it did in all of 2010.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | May 27, 2007
LAUREL -- Beyond the sloping driveway of Central Parke at Victoria Falls, homeowners paint portraits, soak in the sauna or walk in solitude, free from most cares of the world - including children. Natalie Dann, 72, settled in the Prince George's County community with her husband two years ago to live near her adult daughters. The retired New Jersey teacher loves the location in the heart of the bustling Baltimore-Washington corridor. Taking a break from a book club meeting in Central Parke's community center, she said, "My goodness, there is everything you possibly want."
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2003
A change in Harford County's adequate public facilities laws as they relate to schools could cut new home construction in the county in half, according to a leading state economist. Anirban Basu, head of Optimal Solutions Group, told members of a county task force considering changes in the law that, on average, each new house constructed generates more revenue than the cost of services required by residents of the house. Under the current law, preliminary approval for new homes is halted in any school district with a school rated at 120 percent of its designed student capacity.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2003
Dion F. Guthrie, the Harford County councilman who is credited with initiating a citizen's movement against crowding in public schools, wants homebuyers and builders to help pay for new school construction. Guthrie, the lone Democrat on the council, suggests that the county increase the transfer tax on the purchase of new and existing homes from 1 percent to 1.5 percent. He wants the estimated $6 million in revenue that the move would generate to be used for school construction. He also wants builders to pay a filing fee on permits of 1 percent of the gross value of a proposed house or development.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2003
RISING SUN - Cecil County commissioners have rejected a controversial legislative proposal that would have halted preliminary approval for new housing units in more than half the county for a period of six months. By a vote of 3-2 the commissioners killed a bill that its sponsor said would have stopped the paperwork leading up to housing construction while a newly appointed 11-member comprehensive review committee examined the county's long-term growth plan. William C. Manlove, the bill's author, said it was designed to prevent a flurry of new home construction plans from being filed with the county while the review committee did its work.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2003
A change in Harford County's adequate public facilities laws as they relate to schools could cut new home construction in the county in half, according to a leading state economist. Anirban Basu, head of Optimal Solutions Group, told members of a county task force considering changes in the law that, on average, each new house constructed generates more revenue than the cost of services required by residents of the house. Under the current law, preliminary approval for new homes is halted in any school district with a school rated at 120 percent of its designed student capacity.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | January 18, 1995
Carroll residents whose incomes depend on housing construction jammed a county planning commission hearing yesterday to say that the problem isn't growth, but county government's failure to keep up with development.The hearing was the first of two on a planning commission proposal to change the lot recording limit from 50 lots per 12 months to 50 lots per 24 months for each subdivision.The second hearing, scheduled at night for working county residents, will be at 7 p.m. Jan. 31 at Westminster High School.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2003
ELKTON - During a moment of suspense, all eyes in the crowded hearing room turned to Mark H. Guns, the young member of the Cecil County Board of Commissioners. The 43-year-old lawmaker held the deciding vote on one of the hottest issues in the county in recent years: a bill that would impose a six-month moratorium on housing construction in about 63 percent of the county. The four other members of the board were evenly divided on the legislation proposed by Commissioner William C. Manlove with hopes of preventing an onslaught of new development projects making their way into the system as the county prepares to review its long-term growth plan.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | September 16, 2002
Homewood House, a museum and National Historic Landmark on the campus of the Johns Hopkins University, will celebrate its 200th anniversary with a commemorative exhibit called Building Homewood: Vision for a Villa, as well as a building-trades fair and lectures. The programs are designed to shed light on how Homewood was designed and built, how the house was used and the relationship between the building and its landscape. "We're extraordinarily fortunate at Johns Hopkins to have Homewood House as the centerpiece and architectural inspiration for our Homewood campus," said university spokesman Dennis O'Shea.
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