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NEWS
March 5, 1993
In nominating developer Daniel P. Henson to be the city's new housing commissioner, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has opted for a man who has built a solid reputation for getting things done. That's good. But all good things come with a price. In Mr. Henson's case that price is a nightmarish collection of conflict-of-interest situations which must be resolved before he can be confirmed by the City Council.We hope these legal complications -- which suggest no improprieties -- can be successfully ironed out. In many demonstrable ways, Mr. Henson is the type of leader the city's housing department and its twin bureaucracy, the Housing Authority, need.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 25, 2011
The Housing Authority of Baltimore City's strategy to spend millions on outside lawyers to avoid liability for lead paint poisoning its tenants suffered, and then to refuse to pay judgments in the cases it loses, is an utter disgrace. The fact that a government agency is so brazenly defying the courts, and that it has made no effort for years to find a way to fairly compensate the victims of its past negligence, represents a long-term failure of leadership at the authority, one that has been abetted by indifference from City Hall.
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NEWS
By George, he's back DAN RODRICKS | February 24, 1995
Peel back the layers of water-stained wallboard and loose floor tiles, get down to the odorous core of the city's public housing scandal -- can we now officially call it that? -- and we find, if not corruption, at least incompetence. The mayor says the fast-track, no-bid process for granting repair contracts in shabby, city-owned houses was justified by an emergency in Baltimore's housing needs. "The housing situation [was] a public health threat to communities," the mayor said.Well, how did it get that way?
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2011
Paul T. Graziano looked for all the world like a short-timer. Just weeks into his new job as Baltimore's housing commissioner, he was arrested at a Fells Point bar after a drunken tirade laced with anti-gay slurs. That was more than 10 years ago. He's still in the job. Now on his third mayor, he has outlasted three police commissioners and numerous agency heads to become the city's longest-serving housing chief. It's a powerful perch. He oversees not only public housing, but everything from the rebirth of onetime slums such as the Uplands apartments in West Baltimore to code enforcement complaints in wealthy areas like Roland Park.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1997
Touching on several issues, members of the Baltimore City Council tried yesterday to rescue displaced nuns, summon the housing commissioner to appear before the body and repeal a medical waste bill that it enacted earlier this year.Weeks after insurance giant USF&G Corp. evicted a group of nuns from a house the company owned to make way for expansion, the council introduced a resolution yesterday that seeks to make the Northwest Baltimore structure a historic landmark as a way to restrict USF&G from easily selling or changing it.The resolution prompted a fiery speech about suspected greedy business practices from Council President Lawrence A. Bell III, who introduced the measure a year after USF&G negotiated a deal with the council to expand in Mount Washington.
NEWS
January 4, 2001
ONE OF the problems in this society is that expressions of bigotry are too often tolerated. Or excuses are made for those responsible. "She's a really nice person." "He didn't mean it." "He was drunk." The last, of course, is the explanation offered for the homophobic remarks made by the city's new housing commissioner, Paul T. Graziano, at a Fells Point bar last week. Mr. Graziano was arrested after patrons complained, he was asked to leave and he refused. During his encounter with officers, he said he would call Police Commissioner Edward T. Norris.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | October 3, 1993
Days after the rape of a girl at the Lexington Terrace public housing development, the girl's family marched into the office of Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III with a letter asking for a transfer out of their building.Still fuming from a surprise interview with a television news crew, Mr. Henson took one look at the letter and turned to the tenant activist who led the family into the meeting. The letter bore the signature of Council President Mary Pat Clarke, a political rival of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | August 28, 1991
Former Mayor Clarence H. Du Burns, saying the Baltimore Department of Housing and Community Development is badly mismanaged, has called for the firing of Housing Commissioner Robert W. Hearn."
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2011
Paul T. Graziano looked for all the world like a short-timer. Just weeks into his new job as Baltimore's housing commissioner, he was arrested at a Fells Point bar after a drunken tirade laced with anti-gay slurs. That was more than 10 years ago. He's still in the job. Now on his third mayor, he has outlasted three police commissioners and numerous agency heads to become the city's longest-serving housing chief. It's a powerful perch. He oversees not only public housing, but everything from the rebirth of onetime slums such as the Uplands apartments in West Baltimore to code enforcement complaints in wealthy areas like Roland Park.
NEWS
By JOHN B. O'DONNELL and JOHN B. O'DONNELL,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1998
With housing inspectors and the neighborhood association demanding action on his vacant and crumbling West Baltimore building, Judge Askew W. Gatewood Jr. found help at City Hall.But when $175,838 turned out to be insufficient to convert the former restaurant and lounge into two small rowhouses, the Schmoke administration came through with another $30,000.Championed by Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III, the Gatewood project overcame complaints about its high cost and a warning that it didn't fit into the housing department's master plan.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 19, 2011
John R. Burleigh 2d., a civil rights activist who had been chairman of the employment committee of the Congress of Racial Equality and retired from the city housing authority, died July 9 of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Hunting Ridge resident was 86. The son of a foundryman and a homemaker, Mr. Burleigh was born in Baltimore and raised in Dorsey. He was a 1943 graduate of Wiley H. Bates High School in Annapolis, and attended Howard University in Washington.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2011
Echoing her housing commissioner, Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Monday that Baltimore's public housing authority has decided "it is not possible" to pay lead-poisoning judgments that could one day exceed $800 million because the money is needed to improve living conditions for thousands of poor families. But Del. Samuel I. Rosenberg, who helped write Maryland's 1996 lead law, said Monday that the authority cannot plead poverty when children suffered brain damage while living in public housing.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2011
Baltimore housing officials hired a man as a housing inspector and promoted him to a supervisory position although he had been fired by the state Department of Corrections for forging sick leave forms and convicted of more than a dozen counts of theft, according to a report released Tuesday by the city's inspector general. Algie C. Epps worked for the city Department of Housing and Community Development for five years after he was fired by the corrections department. He was promoted to assistant superintendent of code enforcement in spite of his criminal record, according to the report by city Inspector General David McClintock.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | April 30, 2009
The financial woes of one of Baltimore's best-known development companies are rippling through government, with Baltimore lawmakers allowing the developers to walk away from $700,000 in loans on Wednesday and state officials growing concerned that the company will be unable to fulfill its commitments for a planned $1.6 billion office complex in midtown Baltimore. Struever Eccles and Rouse is known for its historic rehabilitation of city industrial buildings, including Tindeco Wharf and Clipper Mill.
NEWS
By Christi Parsons and Christi Parsons,Chicago Tribune | December 14, 2008
WASHINGTON - A Harvard-educated architect is Barack Obama's choice to head his housing agency, one which the president-elect says will play a key role in tackling the mortgage crisis in his administration. Shaun Donovan will bring "fresh thinking" to the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Obama said yesterday, pledging that his nominee will abandon "old ideology and outdated ideas" that have stymied some of the agency's past efforts. "We can't keep throwing money at the problem, hoping for a different result," Obama said in his weekly radio address.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2004
Mayor Martin O'Malley's ambitious plan to gain control of 5,000 abandoned properties has slowed considerably since January, when the city announced that it had nearly half of the properties in hand. Baltimore officials said at the time that they had gained clear title to 2,250 houses and vacant lots and expected to take an equal number by June. As of last month, however, the city has acquired only 33 more Project 5000 properties. Housing officials say the slower-than-expected acquisitions will not delay the project's ultimate goal, which is to return the properties to productive use. The city has begun offering some properties for sale even before it gains full legal control of them, with the assumption that the titles will be clear in time to complete the sales.
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