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NEWS
May 5, 2014
In the recent commentary, "HABC: Selling off and selling out" (May 1), a great deal of speculation was offered regarding the Housing Authority of Baltimore City's (HABC) participation in the new federal Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) program. RAD is the federal government's program to preserve otherwise at-risk public housing for very low-income residents. The federal government has under-funded the public housing program for years, which has resulted in the need for $800 million (in Baltimore alone)
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NEWS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The city expects a flood of applications when it opens the wait list for Section 8 housing vouchers this month for the first time in more than a decade. Housing advocates say 50,000 families or more might sign up for a lottery to fill 25,000 places on the Housing Authority's wait list for the tenant-based housing choice vouchers. The coveted federal subsidies help families pay the portion of their rent that exceeds 30 percent of their income. The vouchers can be used to rent any residence, subject to a cap. In Baltimore, that is roughly $900 for a one-bedroom apartment.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
William J. Schmidt, a former department store buyer who later became director of administration for the Housing Authority of Baltimore City, died Monday at his Bel Air home of complications from Parkinson's disease. He was 79. The son of a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. actuary and a homemaker, William Joseph Schmidt was born in Baltimore and raised on Aisquith Street. He was a 1951 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School in Irvington and earned a bachelor's degree in 1955 in business administration from what is now Loyola University Maryland.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
The Annapolis housing authority created a new position for Carl O. Snowden, whom the city's mayor decided not to reappoint to the authority's board. Snowden's five-year term as chairman of the board of the Housing Authority of the City of Annapolis is due to expire at the end of July. Mayor Mike Pantelides declined to reappoint Snowden. The housing authority board voted on Monday night to create a new position called "chairman emeritus" and appointed Snowden to the position. Snowden announced his new position later Monday at the Annapolis City Council meeting, after lambasting the mayor.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2010
A legal challenge to the Annapolis Housing Authority's practice of banning people from the public agency's residential complexes was settled Friday, leading to a new policy on how the agency will deal with people it doesn't want on its grounds. Deborah Jeon, legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland, said she was pleased that the organization, on behalf of tenants, was "able to achieve our goal of reforming the policy. " For years, tenants had complained that their relatives were not allowed to visit under a "banning list" that was easy to get on and hard to get off, with vague policies and procedures.
NEWS
September 22, 2011
As the executive director of the Housing Authority of Baltimore City, I'd like to correct misleading statements contained in a recent article ("Housing authority racks up legal bills," Sept. 18). The article gives the impression that HABC has spent $4 million in legal fees merely to avoid paying $12 million in court-ordered judgments in 10 cases. That is simply not true. These funds were spent to defend the agency in hundreds of cases. In 2009 alone, our defense saved HABC more than $100 million in unfounded claims.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
Baltimore's housing authority has disciplined a group of employees after an internal investigator found that top agency officials hired lower-level staff to do contracting work at their homes. The agency's inspector general concluded that executive and senior management staff showed "a lack of good judgment" in hiring James Bassetti and Cecil Williams, who work for the housing authority's construction arm, according to a report issued by the office May 13. In all, five housing authority employees and the relative of a sixth paid for work to be done at their homes.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
Representatives from the Baltimore sheriff's office moved across a city housing authority parking lot Wednesday morning, tagging 20 of the agency's vehicles to be seized and eventually sold to pay part of a court judgment to lead paint victims. The Housing Authority of Baltimore City has resisted paying siblings Antonio Fulgham and Brittany McCutcheon the $2.59 million awarded by a jury in 2010, as the agency appeals the case. But the plaintiffs, who suffered lead poisoning while living in public housing, have filed legal actions to move forward with collecting the debts.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
Baltimore's housing bureau does not have to pay a $2.6 million jury award to two siblings who say they were poisoned by lead paint when they lived in public residences as toddlers, a Maryland intermediate appellate court ruled Thursday. The decision, written by Judge Kathryn Grill Graeff of the Court of Special Appeals, hinges on the siblings not having filed notice of their claim within 180 days of their injury, as required by the state statute that governs personal injury suits against local governments.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
Baltimore's Housing Authority filed a motion Friday to prevent its property from being sold in order to satisfy a $2.6 million judgment in a lead paint exposure case, according to the agency. Last week, representatives from the Baltimore's sheriff's office tagged vehicles used by the Housing Authority in anticipation of seizing them to pay off a jury award. Siblings Antonio Fulgham and Brittany McCutcheon were provided the judgment in 2010, but the agency has resisted making payments while it appeals.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
The mayor of Annapolis says he will not reappoint civil rights activist Carl O. Snowden to the board that oversees public housing communities in the city. Mayor Mike Pantelides sent a letter to Snowden on Wednesday indicating he would not reappoint Snowden to the Housing Authority of the City of Annapolis when his term expires at the end of the month. He has not announced who he will nominate to replace Snowden. Snowden, 61, was appointed to the authority's board in 2009 and is the board's chairman.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
Standing outside his tent pitched on the sidewalk by a defunct downtown diner, Jimmy Stewart III wondered aloud where he'll sleep after city officials force him to leave Friday morning. The city is set to remove Stewart, 54, and a couple dozen other homeless people from their temporary homes on soggy mattresses along the Fallsway at makeshift campsites between parking spaces under the Jones Falls Expressway and inside tents huddled against the closed Hollywood Diner. It will be the fifth time in four years the city has forced him to move, Stewart said.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Sixty city public housing residents and union workers staged a protest Wednesday against a plan to sell the housing to private developers. Protesters fear the Housing Authority of Baltimore City's plan would lead to lost jobs, displaced residents and less available public housing. Gary Stroud, 54 and a resident of Bernard Mason Senior Apartments, asked the city to rethink the plan, called Rental Assistance Demonstration program, or RAD, and let "residents and union people sit at the table.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
City officials aren't quite sure what to call the new development in Southeast Baltimore, but they turned out in force Tuesday to celebrate the first apartments completed on land that once held the sprawling O'Donnell Heights public housing complex. Eventually, the 62-acre parcel is supposed to contain 925 homes - a mix of subsidized housing, market-rate apartments and owner-occupied units. The 76 "Key's Pointe" homes that officials celebrated Tuesday, half of which are to be rented at market rates, are to be followed by another 75, on which construction could begin as early as next year.
NEWS
May 5, 2014
In the recent commentary, "HABC: Selling off and selling out" (May 1), a great deal of speculation was offered regarding the Housing Authority of Baltimore City's (HABC) participation in the new federal Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) program. RAD is the federal government's program to preserve otherwise at-risk public housing for very low-income residents. The federal government has under-funded the public housing program for years, which has resulted in the need for $800 million (in Baltimore alone)
NEWS
By Gary Stroud and Anthony Coates | April 30, 2014
Earlier this year, the Baltimore Brew broke a story of a pilot program through HUD that would allow the Housing Authority of Baltimore City (HABC) to transition 22 public housing high-rises to private ownership over the next two years. Citing a lack of funding to make repairs to the buildings, HABC claims that the only way they can make capital improvements that the buildings require is to put them in the hands of private companies lured by lucrative tax incentive packages. Though the wheels have been in motion to implement this so-called "Rental Assistance Demonstration" (RAD)
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
A Baltimore jury on Wednesday awarded $1.3 million in damages to a 17-year-old girl, finding that negligence by the Housing Authority of Baltimore City was a substantial factor in lead-paint poisoning she suffered as a young girl. Amafica Woodland lived in a now-demolished house in the Flag House Courts housing project in East Baltimore until she was nearly 3. Her attorney, Scott Nevin, said he expected the award to be reduced to $690,000 because of a state cap on non-economic damages.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
A 41-year-old Washington woman was sentenced Thursday to three years in federal prison for her role in conspiring to steal $1.4 million from the Housing Authority of Baltimore City, the U.S. Attorney's Office in Maryland announced. In imposing his sentence, U.S. District Judge William D. Quarles, Jr. also ordered Tyeast "Peaches" Brown to serve four years of supervised release after her prison term and to pay the public housing agency at least $1.4 million in restitution. She earlier pleaded guilty.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
The Baltimore Housing Authority's plan to sell 22 of its 28 apartment and townhouse complexes drew dozens of concerned tenants and workers Wednesday to a City Council committee hearing. Floyd Vines, a resident at J. Van Story Branch high-rise, one of the properties to be sold, said Maryland leaders should petition Congress to restore its investment in the public housing, rather than turn to private developers to provide a cash infusion. Under the plan announced last week, the Housing Authority will sell nearly 40 percent of its properties to private developers as a way to raise more than $300 million in renovations and upgrades to the aging complexes that need new elevators, heating and cooling systems and modern kitchens and bathrooms.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
It's growing increasingly difficult for the poorest families in Baltimore to find affordable rental housing, and some housing advocates worry new housing policies such as privatization could make the problem worse. An analysis by the Urban Institute found a yawning gap between the number of low-income renter households and affordable units available in every jurisdiction in the country. In Baltimore City in 2012, there were 43 affordable units available per 100 extremely low-income households, down from 58 in 2000, according to the study published last week.
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