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NEWS
October 7, 1999
The Maryland Disaster Recovery Center, established at 2662 Riva Road in Annapolis to assist victims of Hurricane Floyd, will be open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. beginning today through Saturday.The center will answer questions about housing assistance, flood insurance, problems of small businesses destroyed by the storm and other issues.To apply for disaster relief through the federal government, call 1-800-462-9029.
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NEWS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The city expects a flood of applications when it opens the wait list for Section 8 housing vouchers this month for the first time in more than a decade. Housing advocates say 50,000 families or more might sign up for a lottery to fill 25,000 places on the Housing Authority's wait list for the tenant-based housing choice vouchers. The coveted federal subsidies help families pay the portion of their rent that exceeds 30 percent of their income. The vouchers can be used to rent any residence, subject to a cap. In Baltimore, that is roughly $900 for a one-bedroom apartment.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 24, 1996
Some low-income Westminster residents at the end of the line for federal housing subsidies could move up, while others near the front could be pushed back.Westminster officials want to toughen rules for housing assistance. The City Council approved a proposal last night that would give priority to those who have jobs or are in job training programs.Social welfare workers contend that the proposal would further erode aid to the vulnerable, including the homeless and battered women.The change means Westminster will stop giving preference for housing assistance to people who live in substandard housing, are homeless, have been evicted or have left their homes because of physical violence, or who pay more than half of their monthly income for rent and utilities.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | September 11, 2013
While all eyes are on Syria and on America's response, the real economy in which most Americans live is sputtering. More than four years after the recession officially ended, 11.5 million Americans are unemployed, many of them for years. Nearly 4 million have given up looking for work altogether. If they were actively looking, today's unemployment rate would be 9.5 percent instead of 7.3 percent. The share of the population working or seeking a job is the lowest in 35 years. The unemployment rate among high-school dropouts is 11 percent; for blacks, 13 percent.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1990
Housing affordability problems of first-time homebuyers and low- and moderate-income renters will not fade away in the 1990s, according to "The State of the Nation's Housing 1990," the third in a series of annual reports by the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University.The report states that rents nationwide have stabilized at record high levels, although rents paid by the poor continue to rise.Among all poverty level renters, 68.1 percent paid more than half of their income for rent in 1987, without a guarantee of decent living conditions.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | June 11, 2006
Baltimore's public housing authority never should have been permitted to join a program to ease controls on its spending because officials failed to hold a required public hearing, a federal oversight agency has ruled in a scathing audit. Since July, the Housing Authority of Baltimore City has been part of a federal pilot program called Moving to Work, which allows 27 city and state housing agencies to waive restrictions that dictate how millions in federal housing money must be spent.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1998
A former West Baltimore apartment manager who exploited the shortage of subsidized housing by collecting bribes from people wanting to bypass a two-year waiting list was given a 10-month sentence yesterday.Dorothy Y. Budd accepted $22,500 in bribes from 1993 to 1996 from about 15 tenants seeking apartments at the Poppleton Cooperative, a 96-unit federally subsidized development at 838 W. Fairmount Ave.Budd, 46, who was sentenced in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, took advantage of a shortage of subsidized housing that has forced some city residents to wait as long as 15 years to receive Section 8 vouchers.
NEWS
May 25, 2006
It's not surprising that displaced victims of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita filed a lawsuit against the Federal Emergency Management Agency. What is surprising is that they didn't do it sooner. The class-action lawsuit accuses FEMA of not providing evacuees with temporary housing for the time period promised and seeks a temporary restraining order to prevent the agency from ending housing assistance payments for more than 17,000 low-income families nationwide on May 31. A lot is riding on this case, and not just for the evacuees.
NEWS
By Daniel P. Henson III | May 15, 1998
THE recent Housing Authority of Baltimore City task force reports were received with some skepticism by advocates for the poor.The skeptics argue that implementing the recommendations would reduce housing assistance to the poor. This conclusion is the result of confusion about the purpose of public housing and HABC's objectives. Public housing cannot be all things to all people.Until recently, federal public housing policies had favored the poorest of the poor, which meant that people who were not homeless stood scant chance of getting in public housing.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | October 6, 1991
Two Western Maryland College students will assist the city's Office of Housing and Community Development find ways to help low-income families get off federal housing assistance."
NEWS
May 6, 2013
In her April 23 column, “Forcing landlords to accept vouchers won't help the poor,” Marta H. Mossburg quoted me as saying that laws prohibiting landlords to accept Section 8 vouchers “exacerbate” the problem of finding housing for the poor. That's wrong. When Ms. Mossburg interviewed me for her column, I was clear: banning housing discrimination based on source of income will help increase housing options for the poor. I told her about fieldwork I've done with families in Baltimore; Mobile, Ala.; and New Haven, Stamford and Norwalk, Conn., where I repeatedly heard about landlords refusing to rent to parents who were trying to secure housing.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
A month after Hurricane Sandy crashed ashore, hundreds of Marylanders affected by the storm are still waiting for the federal government to provide funding for housing and living expenses. Federal assistance has been flowing for weeks to families in hard-hit counties of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, but the Federal Emergency Management Agency is still reviewing a formal request for aid that Gov. Martin O'Malley submitted to the White House on Nov. 8. That has left hundreds of Eastern Shore residents affected by Sandy in Worcester, Dorchester and Somerset counties waiting for relief.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
Requests for food stamps, medical assistance, and help with utility bills, fuel and housing have all at least doubled at Harford County agencies and officials see no relief on the horizon. According to a U.S. Census report, Harford has experienced a 2 percentage points jump in its poverty rate in the past year, the largest increase in the state. The county's demographics planner attributes the rise to flawed data, but many local agencies that assist the needy continue to report drastic increases in demand for their services.
NEWS
By Ann M. Simmons and Ann M. Simmons,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 27, 2007
NEW ORLEANS -- The federal government will extend housing assistance payments to victims of hurricanes Katrina and Rita for an additional 18 months, officials announced yesterday, but residents will be required to pay a portion of their rent for part of that period. More than 100,000 households in the Gulf Coast region are dependent on government housing aid they have been relying on since Katrina and Rita struck in the summer of 2005, according to figures from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | June 11, 2006
Baltimore's public housing authority never should have been permitted to join a program to ease controls on its spending because officials failed to hold a required public hearing, a federal oversight agency has ruled in a scathing audit. Since July, the Housing Authority of Baltimore City has been part of a federal pilot program called Moving to Work, which allows 27 city and state housing agencies to waive restrictions that dictate how millions in federal housing money must be spent.
NEWS
May 25, 2006
It's not surprising that displaced victims of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita filed a lawsuit against the Federal Emergency Management Agency. What is surprising is that they didn't do it sooner. The class-action lawsuit accuses FEMA of not providing evacuees with temporary housing for the time period promised and seeks a temporary restraining order to prevent the agency from ending housing assistance payments for more than 17,000 low-income families nationwide on May 31. A lot is riding on this case, and not just for the evacuees.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2003
Faced with a growing gap between the rich and poor, Annapolis officials introduced a plan last night to help more low- and moderate-income residents buy or rent homes. The proposal, sponsored by Mayor Ellen O. Moyer and Alderwomen Classie Gillis Hoyle and Cynthia Carter, would require developers to set aside units to be rented or sold as "moderately priced" units or pay into a fund that would give qualifying residents homebuying or rental assistance. In exchange, developers could build higher-density projects.
NEWS
May 15, 2006
Less than a month before the start of the hurricane season, the Federal Emergency Management Agency is touting a hurricane preparedness plan based on "lessons learned" from last year's disastrous response to Hurricane Katrina. Among new strategies being implemented is a "smarter plan for long-term housing" that streamlines the process for housing displaced hurricane victims and determining their eligibility for housing assistance. The need for such planning is clear. Cities around the country are facing major challenges housing thousands of Katrina evacuees and dealing with an overwhelmed, overly bureaucratic and often bungling FEMA.
NEWS
May 15, 2006
Less than a month before the start of the hurricane season, the Federal Emergency Management Agency is touting a hurricane preparedness plan based on "lessons learned" from last year's disastrous response to Hurricane Katrina. Among new strategies being implemented is a "smarter plan for long-term housing" that streamlines the process for housing displaced hurricane victims and determining their eligibility for housing assistance. The need for such planning is clear. Cities around the country are facing major challenges housing thousands of Katrina evacuees and dealing with an overwhelmed, overly bureaucratic and often bungling FEMA.
NEWS
October 6, 2005
A PLAN by the Housing Authority of Baltimore City to save money by denying rent assistance to low-income residents who move out of the city is understandable, given budget cuts to federal housing programs and the growing need for affordable housing by in-city residents. However, this plan has the potential to restrict families from moving to safer neighborhoods and closer to areas with jobs and better schools, in effect limiting families' mobility and hindering their opportunities. The housing authority has joined a federal program that gives the city wide latitude on how it spends about $200 million that was once dedicated to housing assistance.
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