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NEWS
December 13, 1996
An article in yesterday's editions incorrectly reported that Baltimore's Department of Housing and Community Development approved plans for a commercial blood collection center in Highlandtown. The agency has not given final approval.The Sun regrets the errors.
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NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | September 27, 2011
So much for transparency in Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration. Mr. CityStat cum StateStat professes a love for data but shrouds the truth with the same gusto with which he bares his biceps in sleeveless T-shirts. Take the planned move of the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) from Anne Arundel County to Prince George's County. Discussions surrounding the change have been going on for over a year and earlier this month became almost final with the selection of a developer and location.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 9, 2002
In an effort to revitalize older city neighborhoods, Westminster is asking for more than $500,000 in state Community Legacy funds - its largest request ever for such money, according to the city's housing and community development office. In its application, which is due today, the city is asking for money for four projects. It is seeking: $450,000 for the Union Street Community Center; $100,000 for pedestrian-level street lighting for Pennsylvania Avenue; $160,000 for low- or no-interest revolving loans for low-income families; and $10,000 for homeownership initiatives that will bring more residents to older Westminster neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley today announced plans to move the Department of Housing and Community Development, a state agency with about 330 employees, from Crownsville to Prince George's County. The announcement came as O'Malley designated 14 rail stations as the state's initial sites for mixed-use development connected with transit projects, making them eligible for state spending and tax incentives. He outlined the list of transit-oriented development projects, including seven in metropolitan Baltimore, receiving that legal authorization at a news conference today in Prince George's County.
NEWS
September 12, 1990
Gov. William Donald Schaefer recently announced the Maryland Main Street Designation Program to recognize small towns committed to revitalization.Each year, the program, through a competitive process, will designate roads in several communities as "Maryland Main Streets" to applaud the towns' hard work in maintaining their commercial and historical heritage.The program, administered by the Community Assistance Agency of the Department of Housing and Community Development, will involve a number of state agencies.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 29, 1996
Harold R. Perry resigned this week as deputy commissioner of the city Department of Housing and Community Development after six years on the job.He was responsible for housing and building inspections, development of new neighborhood housing, community services, and administration of state and federal grants.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said Perry will not be replaced for now.Pub Date: 8/29/96
BUSINESS
February 20, 2000
The Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development has financed $29.7 million of mortgage money at 7.25 percent interest for residents of Baltimore and 20 of the state's 23 counties. The On-Behalf-Of program began Monday. Each jurisdiction has income limits, maximum acquisition costs and geographic eligibility requirements. New construction is not eligible. For more information and lists of participating lenders and local eligibility requirements, call 410-514-7501 or 800-638-7781.
NEWS
July 26, 2004
An assistant city housing commissioner has been named president of the Baltimore Community Development Financing Corp., a city-related lending agency. Ruth Louie, an assistant commissioner for community development services with the city Department of Housing and Community Development, will begin her new job Aug. 2. Louie will replace Gary M. Brooks, who left Dec. 30 and has since been named in federal subpoenas related to an investigation of the City Council. The subpoenas asked several developers for information about Brooks and other city officials.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1996
Dynatech Integrated Systems Corp. has opened a technology service center with 20 jobs on Eastern Avenue in East Baltimore, officials said yesterday.Dynatech specializes in software, computer networks and telecommunications. The workers on Eastern Avenue will help maintain and install such equipment for Baltimore's Public Works, Fire, Police and housing departments.Located in the city's empowerment zone, the technical center was made possible by $500,000 in loans through the Council for Economic and Business Opportunity, Baltimore Development Corp.
NEWS
November 21, 1990
William J. Toohey, who was appointed Howard County's public information officer last month, said yesterday that he had resigned to return to his former post of director of public information for the Baltimore Department of Housing and Community Development.Mr. Toohey, 45, said he would resume his $45,000-a-year job in Baltimore Dec. 3. He left the city job Oct. 1 when he was named to the $49,166-a-year county post by County Executive Elizabeth Bobo.He said the incoming executive, Charles I. Ecker, "could not guarantee a position for me."
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 22, 2010
Baltimore should privatize trash collection, cease sending fire trucks and engines to medical calls and consider extracting property taxes from nonprofits, such as hospitals and schools, according to a comprehensive analysis of city government presented today to Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake. The report, prepared by a 150-member volunteer transition committee, is particularly critical of the Department of Housing and Community Development — which "appears to lack a clear and coherent vision for revitalizing ... neighborhoods," and calls for an audit and management review of the Recreation and Parks Department.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | September 23, 2009
The owner of a hard-to-heat 1923 Northeast Baltimore home became curious when she heard the news reports of weatherization assistance being offered through a federal economic stimulus recovery act. Beth Steinbach never raises her thermostat above 65 degrees in her Lauraville frame house. As the mother of four young children, she was looking for ways to get her winter utility bill below the $260 a month she was paying. So she called City Hall. A team of municipal draft busters spent several hours at her Southern Avenue home Tuesday.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | February 2, 2009
Most of the homes in Dundalk's historic "Ships" district date to the 1920s, when they provided housing for steel mill workers at Sparrows Point. A poster from that era hanging in a Dundalk office features a drawing of Uncle Sam assuring buyers that the homes were "scientifically and substantially built." Until recently, the compact neighborhood of well-maintained stucco townhouses and duplexes off Dundalk Avenue was attracting new families and investors. But the national foreclosure crisis has hit those short, narrow streets hard, with at least eight vacant homes in various stages of foreclosure.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | September 28, 2008
In a move intended to bolster the stock of affordable housing in Howard, the county has purchased a 300-unit apartment complex in Columbia. The Howard County Housing Commission nearly doubled its portfolio with the recent acquisition of Columbia Landing on Tamar Drive for $36 million. "This property is in excellent condition on every metric," said Stacy L. Spann, the county's director of Housing and Community Development. "It's very well maintained; its tenant base is stable, and it generates enough revenue to support itself."
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Jessica Anderson,SUN REPORTER | June 17, 2008
For two years, Quinhon N. Goodlowe had been searching for her first home. The Lombard Middle School teacher found it in the Townes at Orchard Ridge, a new community to which she plans to move in July. Goodlowe said she had a difficult time finding affordable housing in a city neighborhood where she felt safe. At Townes at Orchard Ridge she found a new house in a new community that matched her income. Townes at Orchard Ridge is being built on the sites of the former Freedom Village Apartments and Claremont Homes public housing complex in Northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | April 15, 2008
THE PROBLEM -- The cornice near the roof of an abandoned rowhouse was loose and threatening to fall off. THE BACKSTORY -- Nora Giles says she couldn't walk on her own street. For three decades, she has lived on Rankin Place in the Poppleton community of West Baltimore. A rowhouse on the end of the three-house group, 1228 Rankin, has sat empty for about 15 years, said Giles and her brother, James Smith. The previous owner took care of it, Giles said. But after he died, people began dumping trash in the backyard and drug dealers used it to hide their stash.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | March 13, 1991
The Ecker administration plans to conduct public hearings soon to develop a consensus on housing issues, an administration spokesman saidyesterday.The ultimate goal, said county housing and community development coordinator Rochell Brown Jr., is to develop a "housing action plan" that will guide the council through its next comprehensiverezoning of the county.Such a plan would deal not only with the housing needs of low-income people, Brown said, but also with the needs of new families, the elderly, single parents and employees new to the county.
NEWS
June 13, 1996
Affordable-housing hearing is to be held MondayThe Howard County Council will hold a hearing Monday on a resolution that would clear the way for $1.6 million in state aid to build 25 rental townhouses in east Columbia for families earning $18,000 to $30,000.The project, which would be built in the Streamwood community of Columbia's Long Reach village, would be part of the county's efforts to increase affordable housing, said Leonard S. Vaughan, executive director of the county Office of Housing and Community Development.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | September 11, 2007
State economic, housing and community development officials toured Mount Airy's devastated Main Street yesterday, encouraging the owners of businesses destroyed in last week's fire to calculate rebuilding costs that are not covered by insurance so state agencies can help fill in with designated grants and low-interest loans. "You need to know up front what the expenditure is," Samuel J. Lloyd, the state's assistant secretary for small business, told store owners and town officials during a meeting at Town Hall.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | March 14, 2007
Enterprise Community Partners, a Columbia-based nonprofit dedicated to providing affordable housing, is launching an initiative aimed at easing the Baltimore-Washington region's scarcity of homes within reach of working families. Enterprise, an offspring of Columbia founder James W. Rouse and his wife, Patricia, is scheduled to announce today that it has received a $5 million gift, part of which it will use to start a $100 million Maryland Regional Workforce Housing Fund. The rest of the gift will be used to finance other efforts to provide more affordable housing in the Atlanta area and nationwide.
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