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By Scott Calvert | October 14, 2013
Baltimore housing officials have ended a short-lived program to label property inspectors as being in the “shark tank” or “crab barrel” based partly on how many citations they issue to property owners. Eric Booker, the assistant commissioner for code enforcement, announced the new ranking system to inspectors in an Aug. 29 email obtained by The Baltimore Sun. “It will highlight the top inspectors, the 'LEADERS', by category as well as the bottom dwellers, the 'LAGGARDS',” Booker wrote.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert | October 14, 2013
Baltimore housing officials have ended a short-lived program to label property inspectors as being in the “shark tank” or “crab barrel” based partly on how many citations they issue to property owners. Eric Booker, the assistant commissioner for code enforcement, announced the new ranking system to inspectors in an Aug. 29 email obtained by The Baltimore Sun. “It will highlight the top inspectors, the 'LEADERS', by category as well as the bottom dwellers, the 'LAGGARDS',” Booker wrote.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
One of the U.S. Senate's most aggressive watchdogs said Thursday he has begun an inquiry into Baltimore's public housing agency, after receiving calls and emails concerning "a wide range of allegations, including possible conflicts of interest, fraud, waste and abuse of taxpayers' monies. " Sen. Charles E. Grassley of Iowa, ranking Republican member of the Judiciary Committee, requested reams of documents from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, which oversees housing authorities around the country and steers millions of dollars a year to Baltimore.
NEWS
August 16, 2013
How is a Baltimore citizen to make sense of recent Sun coverage of two momentous deals in terms of their impact on Baltimore's citizenry? The first is the preliminary approval by Baltimore City Council of what will amount to some $420 million in public assistance, tax credits and interest for creating the infrastructure for the proposed Harbor Point development ("Harbor Point bonds get OK," Aug. 13). The second, the profoundly disturbing revelation in The Sun of Baltimore's public housing agency's transfer (recently federally approved)
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Scott Calvert and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Using funds meant to help poor families find affordable places to live, Baltimore's public housing agency has paid nearly $6.8 million in long-standing court judgments for lead poisoning suffered by six former residents when they were young children. The Housing Authority of Baltimore City refused for years to pay nearly $12 million in lead-paint injury judgments, saying it lacked the money. But then the agency began to satisfy some of the judgments, previously paying $5 million.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
Maryland officials approved Wednesday a much-debated plan to move the headquarters of the state's housing agency — along with 380 jobs — from Anne Arundel County to Prince George's County. The three-member Board of Public Works voted unanimously to vacate the Department of Housing and Community Development's state-owned building in Crownsville. The department will move to leased space in a new, transit-oriented development at New Carrollton, a hub for MARC and Amtrak as well as the Washington Metro.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2001
The Housing Authority of Baltimore City wrongfully used $885,834 of federal money to bail out the city's troubled cable agency, which transmits City Council meetings and public service announcements, according to an internal audit and agency officials. Two weeks ago, the City Council voted to reimburse the housing agency for the money it spent on cable television over a three-year period that was supposed to be used for housing programs. "We agreed that it was an improper use of HUD [the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development]
BUSINESS
By Ryan Basen | July 24, 2005
Maryland's housing department has unveiled 40-year fixed rate mortgage loans and $5,000 grants toward down payments to help residents cope with higher housing prices. The 40-year loans and down-payment grants are available this summer as part of the Department of Housing and Community Development's More House 4 Less program. More House 4 Less was established to help Marylanders afford houses in a market where the median home sale price rose more than seven times faster than did the median household income in the state between 2000 and 2003.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron | January 28, 1992
Inadequate credit checks and lax collection procedures at Maryland's housing agency may have cost the state more than $2.5 million, a new legislative audit concludes.The state Department of Housing and Community Development failed to monitor some programs, kept some inadequate records and violated some of its own internal controls, the report by the legislature's Department of Fiscal Services concludes.Housing Secretary Jacqueline H. Rogers angrily denounced the audit yesterday, calling it misleading and often inaccurate.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2010
Baltimore officials are trying to revoke the license of an apartment landlord in the city's Reservoir Hill neighborhood and move residents out of the 202 units, a rare step aimed at stamping out drug activity and violence. Baltimore Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano said he issued a notice late Monday of his intent to revoke the license of the Madison Park North Apartments in the 700 block of W. North Ave. A hearing is scheduled for September to determine the fate of the property and its residents, many of whom would be relocated with government assistance if the license is pulled.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Scott Calvert and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Using funds meant to help poor families find affordable places to live, Baltimore's public housing agency has paid nearly $6.8 million in long-standing court judgments for lead poisoning suffered by six former residents when they were young children. The Housing Authority of Baltimore City refused for years to pay nearly $12 million in lead-paint injury judgments, saying it lacked the money. But then the agency began to satisfy some of the judgments, previously paying $5 million.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
It's 4 p.m. when the mobile meals van pulls up to a patch of pavement behind the library at Pennsylvania and North avenues. The cardboard boxes it brings - filled with chicken sandwiches, milk and snacks - may be the first food some children have eaten all day. Even now, nearly 40 years after the federal Summer Food Service Program was first offered in Baltimore, only about half of the 46,000 children who eat free and reduced-price meals during the...
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Baltimore's housing agency must pay a public housing resident $150,000 because the city failed to accommodate the woman's request to be moved, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Wednesday. It also must pay the resident's attorneys $10,000, increase exposure of its reasonable accommodation policies and procedures, train staff about those policies and "submit regular reports to HUD on its efforts to promptly respond to reasonable accommodation requests," HUD said in a statement.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
Maryland officials approved Wednesday a much-debated plan to move the headquarters of the state's housing agency — along with 380 jobs — from Anne Arundel County to Prince George's County. The three-member Board of Public Works voted unanimously to vacate the Department of Housing and Community Development's state-owned building in Crownsville. The department will move to leased space in a new, transit-oriented development at New Carrollton, a hub for MARC and Amtrak as well as the Washington Metro.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
The state Board of Public Works is expected to vote today on a contract that would clear the way for the Department of Housing and Community Development to move from its park-like campus in Crownsville to a transit hub in Prince George's County. The board's members - Gov. Martin O'Malley, Comptroller Peter Franchot and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp - are expected to hear from both supporters and opponents of the hotly debated move to New Carrollton. A spokesman for Franchot, Andrew Friedson, said the comptroller was reviewing the deal overnight and anticipates asking questions.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2013
A month after across-the-board federal spending cuts began, there are signs that one of the most troubling potential consequences for Maryland — the furloughing of federal employees — might not be as widespread as initially feared. But the state has not gone unscathed by the $85 billion in cuts known as sequestration, and some of the first tangible changes in the Baltimore area are beginning to emerge as federal services are trimmed. Fort McHenry in Baltimore and the Hampton National Historic Site near Towson plan to cut hours this summer, limiting visits by tourists.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron | January 28, 1992
Inadequate credit checks and lax collection procedures at Maryland's housing agency may have cost the state more than $2.5 million, a new legislative audit concludes.The state Department of Housing and Community Development failed to monitor some programs, kept some inadequate records and violated some of its own internal controls, the report by the legislature's Department of Fiscal Services concludes.Housing Secretary Jacqueline H. Rogers angrily denounced the audit yesterday, calling it misleading and often inaccurate.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and JoAnna Daemmrich and Jim Haner and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Eric Siegel contributed to this article | January 31, 1996
Signaling a widening probe into possible conflicts of interest in the Baltimore housing department, the mayor and housing commissioner announced yesterday that they are reviewing the financial records of all city inspectors to see if they own slum properties.The announcement came two days after an article in The Sun detailed more than a hundred deficiencies in four of the 17 rental rowhouses owned by city housing inspection superintendent Henry John "Jack" Reed III, 55.Mr. Reed has been an employee of the Housing and Community Development Department for nearly three decades -- during a time when he was amassing a portfolio of decrepit properties in East Baltimore beset by faulty heating systems, flooded basements, leaky sewage pipes and rampant rat infestation.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
A 41-year-old Washington woman was sentenced Thursday to three years in federal prison for her role in conspiring to steal $1.4 million from the Housing Authority of Baltimore City, the U.S. Attorney's Office in Maryland announced. In imposing his sentence, U.S. District Judge William D. Quarles, Jr. also ordered Tyeast "Peaches" Brown to serve four years of supervised release after her prison term and to pay the public housing agency at least $1.4 million in restitution. She earlier pleaded guilty.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
Baltimore Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano met last month with an influential state lawmaker to discuss more than $8 million in unpaid court-ordered judgments against the city's housing authority, which have resulted from lead-paint poisoning lawsuits brought by former public housing residents. But Del. Samuel I. “Sandy” Rosenberg said Graziano did not cover new ground at the June 5 meeting. “There was nothing new that I was told,” said Rosenberg, a Baltimore Democrat who is vice chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee.
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