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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | January 31, 1992
The Schmoke administration's agency for renovating Baltimore's vacant housing and providing affordable homes for the poor has spent more money on new buildings than recycling abandoned ones, a coalition of housing advocates charges.Although the Community Development Finance Corp. "has done a remarkable job" in its first two years of operation, the quasi-public agency has strayed from Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's original goal for it, according to an audit by the Maryland Alliance for Responsible Investment.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
Within the past five years, Shantress Wise says, she has been forced out of one home by a developer, evicted from another apartment after losing her job, and lived in two homeless shelters. Wise, of Baltimore, said the experience inspired her to join a spirited gathering of housing and community activists Saturday at an East Baltimore church to protest what they called unfair city housing policies and development that leaves the community out of the process. The group called upon the city to do more to house the homeless and to build additional affordable housing.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2011
The Baltimore City Council voted Monday to extend for eight years a law requiring developers to build affordable housing in projects that receive large public subsidies — but not to make the law permanent, as advocates had hoped. The council members "are not helping to bring the middle class back to Baltimore," said Mel Freeman, executive director of the Citizens Planning and Housing Association, the law's chief proponent. The law is intended to let people from lower income brackets live in neighborhoods with good schools, parks and other amenities.
NEWS
March 17, 2014
I found The Sun's blandly congratulatory tone in its recent editorial regarding the new federal housing Rental Assistance Demonstration program profoundly disturbing ( "An opportunity for Baltimore's public housing residents," March 10). The editorial, which applauded the Housing Authority's decision to sell more than a third of its 11,000 public housing units to private developers in order to finance $300 million in capital improvements, ignored some fundamental truths. The RAD is not only a last-resort expedient, given the magnitude of Baltimore's housing needs, but to the degree that the program represents a huge new step in the direction of privatizing public housing, it signals yet again the fact that as a society we are moving further and further away from honoring our nation's housing policy goal of a decent house and suitable living environment for every American family.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1997
Consumer and housing advocates for the poor are raising red flags about a complex and controversial bill that would deregulate Maryland's mortgage industry by removing protections for borrowers from the law.Their concerns prompted Del. Gerald J. Curran, chairman of the House Commerce and Government Matters Committee, to postpone a vote on the bill Friday. He made that decision after meeting Thursday with a representative of St. Ambrose Housing Aid Center, a Baltimore advocacy group.Curran, a Baltimore Democrat, said he wanted his financial institutions subcommittee to reconsider House Bill 94, which the panel approved last week.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2000
SNOW HILL - Five years ago, a referendum against a proposed low-income housing development touched off a debate with racial overtones that divided residents of this 300-year-old Worcester County seat. Now, however, a similar proposal is quickly moving ahead, boosted by a coalition of housing activists, town officials and area ministers - not to mention a public relations effort that included an informational mailing to every household in town. Their plan undone by 78 votes at the polls in 1995, housing advocates were determined to build a stronger base of support for their newest project aimed at poor working families.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1997
The House of Delegates gave final legislative approval yesterday to a bill that would eliminate state licensing and regulation of mortgage-lending subsidiaries of commercial banks, if those banks have a branch in Maryland.H. Robert Hergenroeder Jr., Maryland's commissioner of financial regulation, and banking lobbyists maintained that state oversight is redundant because of federal regulation. The bill will affect 103 subsidiaries.The legislation is the Senate's considerably watered-down version of a House bill to deregulate the mortgage industry -- a controversial measure opposed by consumer proponents and housing advocates for the poor.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | July 3, 1991
A tenant has been appointed to Anne Arundel's public housing board, after months of complaints by black leaders and housing advocates that the agency was unresponsive to residents.County Executive Robert R. Neall, responding to the calls for better tenant representation,selected a Freetown resident this week to serve on the seven-member governing board.Zadia Dailey, a nursing aide who has lived in Freetown since 1985, is the first resident of the 154-unit family housing community in Pasadena to serve on the board.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2005
Affordable-housing advocates and builders veered off in two directions this week as a committee created by Howard County officials struggled to craft a strategy to provide more homes for middle-class people. Builders in the group discussed the technicalities of building homes for familes with incomes up to $106,000, while faith-based housing advocates warned that the greater need is to serve working families with incomes below $75,000. "We are going to become a very exclusive county unless we take action," said Bob Buckneier, one of three members of the Interfaith Coalition for Affordable Housing participating in the committee's work.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo ` | January 31, 1992
The Schmoke administration's agency for renovating Baltimore's vacant housing and providing affordable homes for the poor has spent more money on new buildings than recycling abandoned ones, a coalition of housing advocates charges.Although the Community Development Finance Corp. "has done a remarkable job" in its first two years of operation, the quasi-public agency has strayed from Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's original goal for it, according to an audit by the Maryland Alliance for Responsible Investment.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
Howard County housing director Tom Carbo can tick off plenty of reasons to live in Howard County — good schools, safe neighborhoods, relatively easy commutes to Baltimore and Washington. But when the time came for him to purchase a home for his family, even he felt priced out. He and his wife had been looking at a Ryland Home in Howard County in 1996 when they sold their first house in the Baltimore City neighborhood of Edmondson Village. But they found the same model in Carroll County for significantly less, and the family wound up moving to Westminster.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 28, 2011
Dickens W. Warfield, a psychologist who as associate director of Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. became an outspoken advocate for fair housing, died Oct. 21 of liver cancer at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. The former longtime Towson resident was 86. The daughter of a lawyer and a homemaker, Dickens Waddell was born in Detroit, and later moved with her family to Pittsburgh, where she attended what is now Carnegie Mellon University for two years. After the death in 1944 of her father, she and her mother moved to Roland Park, where she enrolled at Goucher College and was a 1946 Phi Beta Kappa graduate, earning a bachelor's degree in psychology.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2011
Laura Elizabeth McGrath, a Columbia-based affordable housing advocate, died of colon cancer Sept. 22 at her Hyattsville home. The former Northeast Baltimore resident was 46. Born in Baltimore and raised in Gardenville on LaSalle Avenue, she was a 1982 Western High School graduate and earned a bachelor's degree in anthropology from the University of Maryland, College Park. She also had a master's degree in applied anthropology with a concentration in urban planning and community development.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2011
Martin Appell Dyer, a lawyer and neighborhood activist who was the first African-American to enroll at St. John's College in Annapolis, died Thursday of cancer at his Windsor Hills home. He was 80. The son of Martin A. Dyer, a steelworker, and Margaret Louise Dyer, a secretary to Lillie Mae Jackson when she was president of the Baltimore chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, he was born and raised in East Baltimore. After graduating from Paul Laurence Dunbar High School in 1948, he entered St. John's College.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2011
The Baltimore City Council voted Monday to extend for eight years a law requiring developers to build affordable housing in projects that receive large public subsidies — but not to make the law permanent, as advocates had hoped. The council members "are not helping to bring the middle class back to Baltimore," said Mel Freeman, executive director of the Citizens Planning and Housing Association, the law's chief proponent. The law is intended to let people from lower income brackets live in neighborhoods with good schools, parks and other amenities.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2010
Amira Williams barely survived a deadly fire three years ago that burned her family's home and 95 percent of her body. Now, the young girl faces a new tragedy. The 7-year-old will be moving out of her North Broadway home between Christmas and New Year's, but her mother, Chrissy Thomas, doesn't know where the family of four will go. Baltimore housing records show that Thomas' rental has at least 26 code violations, including rodent and mold problems and peeling paint, which could be a lead-poisoning hazard.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | August 14, 1991
With a crowd of first-time homebuyers cheering him on, County Executive Robert R. Neall pledged Monday night to initiate new programs to make housing more affordable.The executive scored with housing advocates by promising to help families squeezed by the county's high home prices and soaring rents."Affordable housing is one of the main priorities for the Neall administration today," Neall told several dozen new homeowners and state officials at a block party in Severn.The county was celebrating the completion of the Riviera Heights subdivision, an affordable neighborhood created by moving 14 homes from a noise zone near Baltimore-Washington International Airport.
BUSINESS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1997
Over the objections of consumer proponents and housing advocates for the poor, a House committee yesterday narrowly approved a controversial bill that would deregulate Maryland's mortgage industry.After limited debate, the Commerce and Government Matters Committee voted 12-10 to send to the House floor a bill sponsored by its chairman, Del. Gerald J. Curran, that opponents say would remove protections for borrowers from state law."It's a sad day for consumers," said Kimberley A. Propeack, an attorney with the St. Ambrose Housing Aid Center, a Baltimore advocacy group that opposed the bill.
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