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By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | December 15, 1991
It's time for the readers of this column to have the last word.A Knoxville, Tenn., reader echoed many irate men after a recent column about the eternal housework battle between working couples."
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Susan Reimer | February 19, 2014
If a husband takes on more chores, does a grateful wife repay his efforts with more sex? It might depend on which chores. Lori Gottlieb, a psychologist and author of "Marry Him: The Case for Settling for Mr. Good Enough," suggested in a New York Times Magazine article that partners in so-called peer marriages, or more equal marriages, report having less sex than partners in marriages where the husband and the wife perform more traditional duties....
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BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | November 12, 1990
(TC Men, do you think of retiring? Retirement may make you healthier, but you'll pay a price. John Gottman, PhD, speaking at American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy, said, "A 4-year study of couples found that men who did housework chores were healthier than those who didn't. The theory is that willingness to do menial housework reflects a better ability to resolve marital conflicts and stress in general, making men healthier."LOCAL CEO CORNER: When I asked Robert Barnhill, president of Tessco, Hunt Valley, national suppliers to the paging and cellular telephone industries, to share his success principles, he said: "O.K.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | March 12, 2006
WHAT DO WOMEN want? A pair of sociology professors at the University of Virginia think they know: a sensitive guy with a healthy paycheck. Even women who might describe themselves as feminists report being happier in marriages where the husbands earns the lion's share of income, as long as he is engaged in the emotional life of the marriage, according to the study by W. Bradford Wilcox and Steven L. Nock. In a report titled "What's Love Got to Do With It: Equality, Equity, Commitment and Women's Marital Quality," published in the March issue of the journal Social Forces, the two researchers set conventional wisdom on its ear. For example: The emotional engagement of her husband, not the division of housework and paid work, is the most important determinant of a woman's marital happiness.
FEATURES
By From Ladies' Home Journal Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 18, 1994
"So there were dog hairs on the back seat of the car!" saysHannah, 35, a beautiful woman with long blond hair and a flowing dress. "Is that a reason for Rob to go on a rampage?"Hannah knows she's not a world-class housekeeper and never intended to compete with her husband's mother in that department. "I work as a music editor at a magazine, I'm very involved in our 10-year-old daughter's life -- I often take Sharon and her friends to concerts and the museum after school -- and I still do all the errands and everything around the house.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | February 20, 1994
Your letters always arrive in large sacks after a column about the second shift at home that most employed women put in. This issue of who does the housework clearly is still placing a strain on otherwise compatible relationships."
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | March 23, 1992
In 1987 Susan Palmer moved from New Brunswick, N.J., to the Palouse, an area in the northwestern United States that includes Whitman County in Washington and Latah County in Idaho.The Palouse is known as the pea and lentil capital of the world, and the University of Idaho and Washington State University are there.But the area has a problem."Jobs are scarce for everyone, but women and minorities are disproportionately underemployed," said Ms. Palmer, a sociologist specializing in labor-market inequality and job stratification.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2004
Among the many flea market vendors on the parking lot at Shepherd's Staff in Westminster tomorrow will be several McDaniel College students with nothing to sell but their labor. About a dozen students have organized Chores for Charity and are offering their time and housekeeping talents for an hourly fee of $5. They plan to turn the fruits of their labor over to the ministry that serves the needy in Carroll County. "We will be hiring ourselves out for a good cause," said Tiffany Mack, a junior from Baltimore.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | June 28, 2005
A RECENT study published in the Journal of Marriage and Family shows that men do more housework than their wives give them credit for, and women actually do less than they think. The study also showed that men overestimate the amount of time their wives spend on household chores, suggesting either a genuine awareness of how much she does, or a complete capitulation to her claims and complaints. This can be dangerous information in the hands of the wrong person, if you know what I mean.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | February 17, 1992
Most people believe that men in the nation's 13.7 million two-career families are doing more housework.But the overall distribution of labor hasn't changed -- and it impedes women's career progress, said Charles Rodgers, principal in the Boston-based consulting firm of Work/Family Directions."
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | August 2, 2005
IN A RECENT edition of People magazine, there was a description of a new parenting trend: outsourcing. Busy moms and dads can pay someone to teach their children to ride a two-wheeler, to potty-train their toddlers, to bake cupcakes for a birthday snack at school or sew Scout badges on a uniform. And, on the ABC News Web site, there was a report on the increasing number of parents who attend classes and support groups or hire coaches to make them better parents. Finally, a cover story in New York magazine profiled Isabel Kallman, the "Alpha Mom," an energetic new mother who has plans for a 24-hour cable network of the same name that will provide nothing but expert advice for other new mothers.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | June 28, 2005
A RECENT study published in the Journal of Marriage and Family shows that men do more housework than their wives give them credit for, and women actually do less than they think. The study also showed that men overestimate the amount of time their wives spend on household chores, suggesting either a genuine awareness of how much she does, or a complete capitulation to her claims and complaints. This can be dangerous information in the hands of the wrong person, if you know what I mean.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2004
Among the many flea market vendors on the parking lot at Shepherd's Staff in Westminster tomorrow will be several McDaniel College students with nothing to sell but their labor. About a dozen students have organized Chores for Charity and are offering their time and housekeeping talents for an hourly fee of $5. They plan to turn the fruits of their labor over to the ministry that serves the needy in Carroll County. "We will be hiring ourselves out for a good cause," said Tiffany Mack, a junior from Baltimore.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | December 7, 2003
I never pack a gym bag because I'm always forgetting something. It seems simpler to just drive home and shower. How do successful locker-room-goers deal with it? Avid gym-goers will tell you that it's worth buying a separate set of everything for stocking your gym bag. Always pack your bag at night, never in the morning when you're rushed. If you need to shave or blow-dry your hair, allow extra time. Do you alternate activities, like basketball and yoga? Consider keeping separate, sport-specific gym bags.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2002
David and Michele Cordle of Annapolis have about as egalitarian a view of marriage as anyone they know. They are co-equals with successful careers but still make family their top priority. So why is it that Michele seems stuck with most of the chores? Even by David's accounting, his wife handles about 60 percent of the workload from cleaning to shopping and looking after their four children. He's no slouch, they both agree, but she does much more and they sometimes end up arguing about it. "I'm not doing what she thinks I should be doing," admits David, 44, chief investigator for the Anne Arundel County state's attorney's office and an elected city alderman.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 22, 2002
Chanie Baron is a bit busy. The mother of nine, including an infant, is cleaning her home for Passover - turning over dresser drawers, emptying coat pockets, washing toys, scrubbing the kitchen and replacing utensils with holiday kitchenware. She's also making sleeping accommodations for her parents from Pittsburgh, an older sister and brother-in-law and their eight children from Brooklyn, N.Y., and about 20 Seder guests. Bubbie, Baron's grandmother Sorah Wolosow from New York, might also visit.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | December 7, 2003
I never pack a gym bag because I'm always forgetting something. It seems simpler to just drive home and shower. How do successful locker-room-goers deal with it? Avid gym-goers will tell you that it's worth buying a separate set of everything for stocking your gym bag. Always pack your bag at night, never in the morning when you're rushed. If you need to shave or blow-dry your hair, allow extra time. Do you alternate activities, like basketball and yoga? Consider keeping separate, sport-specific gym bags.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2002
David and Michele Cordle of Annapolis have about as egalitarian a view of marriage as anyone they know. They are co-equals with successful careers but still make family their top priority. So why is it that Michele seems stuck with most of the chores? Even by David's accounting, his wife handles about 60 percent of the workload from cleaning to shopping and looking after their four children. He's no slouch, they both agree, but she does much more and they sometimes end up arguing about it. "I'm not doing what she thinks I should be doing," admits David, 44, chief investigator for the Anne Arundel County state's attorney's office and an elected city alderman.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | December 21, 1999
CHERYL MENDELSON has a dirty little secret: She likes to clean.And she knows what she is doing, because she learned at the knees of a couple of old-country grandmothers and a farm-wife mother, women who proudly considered their homes an extension of themselves."
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | August 11, 1998
RECENTLY, I took time off and spent a week at the beach with my family and a week at home cleaning out closets and washing walls and windows.When I returned to work, my women friends asked where I had gone and what I had done, and when I told them, every one expressed her envy.Not of my week at the beach -- of my week cleaning house."Don't you feel wonderful?" asked one of my friends. And I knew instinctively that she was not asking if I had been rejuvenated by the sound of the ocean."I feel like I am starting fresh," I said, smiling placidly.
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