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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2004
Pigtown in Southwest Baltimore has gentrified to the point that City Hall has tried to give it the ritzier name of Washington Village, but dozens of vacant houses continue to blight the area still best known for its slaughterhouse past. Turning abandoned houses into livable homes can be almost as difficult as shaking an unflattering-but-catchy nickname, but that is expected to happen to 24 properties in the neighborhood. The city plans to sell the rowhouses to Chesapeake Habitat for Humanity as part of Mayor Martin O'Malley's Project 5000, a plan to return 5,000 vacant homes to productive use. Terms of the deal have not been worked out, but city officials say the plan shows the value of the project, which for three years has sought to obtain ownership, or clear title, to abandoned houses so that they can be sold and redeveloped.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A two-alarm fire broke out in a vacant rowhome in West Baltimore early Friday morning, though no one was reported to be injured. Baltimore fire department spokesman Ian Brennan said the fire was reported around 4 a.m. in the 600 block of N. Carey St. in the Harlem Park neighborhood, with heavy fire showing from the rear of the building when firefighters arrived. The fire also damaged the two adjacent rowhouses, one which was occupied and the other vacant. Brennan said the fire took more than two hours to get under control because firefighters were unable to enter the vacant structures to attack it. The cause of the fire is under investigation.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | September 26, 2009
Joseph Armando Liberto, a 54-year veteran of Baltimore movie houses who managed the Stanley, once Baltimore's largest cinema, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Sept. 19 at the Northwest Hospital Center. The Catonsville Manor resident was 82. Born in Baltimore and raised on Greene Street in downtown Baltimore, he attended St. John the Baptist Parochial School and was a 1944 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School. While in high school, he worked summers in his family's Lexington Market produce business.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Eleven people were displaced from their homes Tuesday night after a vacant rowhouse in Southwest Baltimore partially collapsed, compromising the houses on either side of it. Connor Scott, a spokesman for the city's Office of Emergency Management, said Wilkens Avenue will be closed in both directions between S. Payson Street and S. Monroe Street until about midnight Tuesday while Baltimore Gas and Electric crews shut off gas to the building....
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2005
Chet Pajardo talked sports with neighbors, grilled in the back yard and played basketball with children in the street, neighbors said. He drove a red minivan and puttered inside his red brick house at the end of an Owings Mills cul-de-sac. "Typical everyday nice-guy neighbor," said John Parham, who lives next door to Pajardo on Kentbury Court. Only the swarm of police cars that surrounded Pajardo's red-brick house this week gave his neighbors an inkling that the friendly father of three might have legal problems.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2002
John Henry Miller, a former restaurateur who founded a stained-glass business, died of heart failure Feb. 8 at a hospital in Billings, Mont. He was 88 and lived in Kingsville for nearly half a century before moving to Cheyenne, Wyo., 15 years ago. A member of the family that founded the now-defunct Miller Brothers Restaurant in downtown Baltimore, he managed the Kingsville Inn on Belair Road from 1950 to 1962, and owned Perry House in the Perry Hall...
BUSINESS
July 7, 1991
Shelter Development Corp. and First Lutheran Church of Towson have begun construction of Timothy House, a 112-unit rental community for senior citizens on Dunvale Road between York Road and Fairmount Avenue. When complete in early 1992, the complex will contain efficiencies and one- and two-bedroom apartments with monthly rents ranging from $295 to $415, not including utilities. Marks, Thomas and Associates was the architect. A leasing center is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.Partners Management Co. has completed a $2 million renovation of the Highland Village Apartments, a 683-unit town house apartment community in the Lansdowne area of southwest Baltimore County.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2002
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is granting $10 million nationwide to defray the cost of lead testing on houses to assist compliance with new federal safety regulations. Baltimore conducts more than 1,000 lead abatements every year, of which several hundred are eligible to receive money toward post-abatement dust testing. The city has not calculated how much it will get, said Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, Baltimore health commissioner. "We're already doing clearance tests," said Beilenson.
BUSINESS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1998
Cliffholme, the 14,000-square-foot Green Spring Valley estate on 9 1/2 verdant acres scheduled to be auctioned Thursday, has been described by architects and historians as one of Baltimore's great houses.The three-story house, capped by three large chimneys, sits atop a ridge with a spectacular view of the valley floor and environs. The home, with nine bedrooms, seven bathrooms and seven fireplaces, looks as though it could be a setting for a Jane Austen novel or a "Masterpiece Theater" production.
NEWS
April 24, 1995
It's difficult to put much hope in Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's latest proposal to auction off houses as a means to restore vitality to Baltimore's declining neighborhoods. This will be the mayor's third attempt with this tactic.Earlier he chose some of the most deteriorated abandoned houses in Baltimore to auction, hoping the rock-bottom prices they would sell for would boost interest. But a complex foreclosure process led to only 350 of 1,500 vacant houses being sold in 1993. And in a similar auction last April, only 52 of 125 houses sold and 13 of those bidders failed to qualify for mortgages.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2013
Sarah Holbrook, a senior at McDaniel College, knows first-hand the gratitude for a home-cooked meal during a family crisis. When she was 11, her 9-year-old brother died of leukemia. That's why she's been involved since she was a freshman with Heroes Helping Hopkins, an on-campus group that cooks meals for families at the Believe in Tomorrow Children's House, which provides a place to stay for families with children being treated for serious illnesses at Johns Hopkins hospital. "I understand what they're going through how hard it can be, how exhausting," said Holbrook, co-president of the group.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2013
Fifty Baltimore County firefighters battled a house fire in the Hampton area on Sunday afternoon, the county Fire Marshal's office said. None of the seven family members living in the home were injured, officials said. Firefighters were called to the scene at about 12:40 p.m. and found heavy fire on the second floor of the home in the 1500 block of Providence Road. It took about an hour to get the fire under control, said Bruce Schultz, a captain at the Office of the Fire Marshal, in an email.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | July 21, 2012
I had a lonely feeling as I walked along the empty, isolated blocks just north of the Johns Hopkins Hospital in East Baltimore. In the distance, a bulldozer was eating away at a block of Patterson Park Avenue rowhouses. The emptied lots reminded me of 1950s urban renewal clearance. It's been a full decade since redevelopment was announced for this big chunk of Baltimore: 88 acres bounded by Broadway, Patterson Park Avenue, Madison Street and the Amtrak railway embankment. It's the neighborhood that I often viewed from a train window, a spot that seemed to embody 1940s working-class East Baltimore, when there were abundant jobs at the tin mills, paint factories and garment-making shops.
EXPLORE
April 30, 2012
Among the 63 calls the Arbutus Volunteer Fire Department received for medical and fire-rescue service during the period April 22-29 were the following: Illinois Avenue, 3000 block, 11:50 p.m. April 28. Crews from the English Consul, Arbutus, Lansdowne and Violetville volunteer stations and Halethorpe career station responded to the report of a dwelling fire in Baltimore Highlands and extinguished a small stove top fire. Furnace Avenue, 5600 block, 7:56 p.m. April 27. Crews responded to the report of a dwelling fire in Elkridge and assisted local units in extinguishing the fire.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | March 9, 2012
One in 9 housing units in the Baltimore region sat empty last year, from well-tended homes for sale to boarded-up shells, according to new estimates from the Census Bureau . That's on the high side but not nearly the highest. The agency measured vacancy for the 75 largest metro areas -- not counting vacation properties shuttered in the off-season -- and says the Baltimore region is in a three-way tie with Chicago and Pittsburgh for the 26th worst rate. (It's 11.6 percent, to be exact.)
NEWS
December 30, 2011
The city is misguided if it believes that demolishing vacant homes is the solution to providing affordable housing in Baltimore ("City 'affordable housing' fund destroys more houses than it builds," Dec. 21). Demolishing vacant homes is myopic, since the number of vacant homes will increase as long as the city's population continues to decline. That alone will undermine any alleged improvements to public safety. A 1996 demolition project targeting vacant housing stock in Camden, N.J., initially decreased the vacant housing stock of the city.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1998
Law day for elderly will include light breakfast and lunch"Important Legal Papers to Protect Yourself and Your Property" and "Rights and Responsibilities of Nursing Home Residents and Their Families" will be discussed at the Seventh Annual Law Day for the Elderly.Scheduled for 9: 15 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 2 at the Edward F. Borgerding Court Building at 5800 Wabash Ave., the program is free to Baltimore senior citizens, their families and caregivers.This event, sponsored by the Bar Association of Baltimore City Legal Services to the Elderly Program and the Baltimore City Commission on Aging and Retirement Education, will include a continental breakfast and lunch.
NEWS
October 8, 1994
This much is indisputable: The number of vacant houses in Baltimore City has risen alarmingly in recent years. There are no accurate numbers, though. Forget the 7,700 figure the housing department likes to throw around. Nearly two years ago, the Johns Hopkins Institute for Policy Studies put vacant houses in the city at 27,222. "Sixty percent of the abandoned housing stock has been abandoned more than two years and therefore is unlikely to be salvageable," researchers concluded.What is to be done?
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
The vacant brick rowhouse at 2037 Orleans St. looks like many of the 16,000 abandoned homes that beset Baltimore. The front door is covered with plywood. The weedy backyard is strewn with trash. But this empty house stands out in one notable way: It's owned by Police Maj. Melvin T. Russell, commander of the Eastern District - a man who has seen firsthand how blight has damaged East Baltimore and whose job makes him a role model in the community. "I'm an advocate against these people," Russell said Monday, referring to owners of run-down vacants.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
Just as houses come in all different designs and sizes, so do the families that live within them. The large, end-of-group rowhouse in Federal Hill that belongs to the Johnson family shelters multiple generations. "We are three generations of women, a poodle and two goldfish all living in this home that we decided to make 21st century," laughed Gilda Johnson, who lives there with her 94-year-old mother, Carlyn Johnson, and her 16-year-old daughter, Ce Ce Johnson. This family of women own three residential properties and five parcels of commercial property in Federal Hill.
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