Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHouseplants
IN THE NEWS

Houseplants

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2009
Question: How do you keep a kitten from digging in houseplants? Would pine cones harm the kitten? Answer: A cat repellent can be applied to your houseplants. These repellents will need to be applied every few weeks to stay effective. You could also cover the exposed potting soil with rough decorative rocks to discourage cats from digging. Or you can arrange flat rock pieces on the surface that are too heavy for the kitten to move. We doubt pine cones would harm your kitten, but you can check with your veterinarian who also may have ideas for protecting your houseplants.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2009
Question: How do you keep a kitten from digging in houseplants? Would pine cones harm the kitten? Answer: A cat repellent can be applied to your houseplants. These repellents will need to be applied every few weeks to stay effective. You could also cover the exposed potting soil with rough decorative rocks to discourage cats from digging. Or you can arrange flat rock pieces on the surface that are too heavy for the kitten to move. We doubt pine cones would harm your kitten, but you can check with your veterinarian who also may have ideas for protecting your houseplants.
Advertisement
FEATURES
December 6, 1998
Q. I was given some full-grown foliage houseplants by a neighbor who is leaving the area. They're beautiful, but I know nothing about houseplants. Right now I'm worried that they're overgrowing their pots. How do you know when to repot? What should I do if it's time?A. When the roots grow out of the bottom of the pot, it's time to repot. Select a new container (with drainage holes). It should be 1 to 2 inches greater in diameter than the old pot.Buy a nonsoil growing medium - a mixture of peat, vermiculite and perlite.
NEWS
By Beth Botts and Beth Botts,Chicago Tribune | July 15, 2007
Sometime this summer, chances are you're going to go on vacation. But what about your plants? How will they live without you? Their major enemies will be heat and moisture loss. But with some planning, you can be pretty confident that you will not come back to a garden or houseplant graveyard. Choose survivors --If you know you are going to be away for a week or more this summer, don't plant thirsty things such as impatiens. Smart owners of weekend homes who often leave their plants for weeks at a time rely on drought-tolerant species such as black-eyed Susans (rudbeckia)
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 1, 2005
I brought my peace lilies indoors weeks ago for the winter, and now their young leaves have holes in them. I see webbing in the plant base and slime stuff as well. I can't find what is doing the munching. Examine houseplants carefully before bringing them indoors. A sharp water spray helps dislodge many potential pests such as mites. Your peace lilies likely harbor slugs. Slugs hide in soil and leaf litter and come out at night to feed, leaving slime behind. Try the usual slug control methods, such as a small dish of beer to drown them or an empty grapefruit half, which provides a dark, moist hiding place to lure them so you can catch them.
NEWS
By Beth Botts and Beth Botts,Chicago Tribune | December 7, 2003
Your home, with its warm, dry air and handsome window treatments, may be a delight for people. But to a houseplant, it can be a hostile environment. Many of the plants we like to grow indoors hail from tropical, subtropical or desert lands where they evolved to need more light and much better drainage than they typically get in the living room. A plant that comes from a moist rain forest can have a hard time in the dry air of a centrally heated apartment. So how can you help plants survive in your home?
NEWS
By Beth Botts and Beth Botts,Chicago Tribune | July 15, 2007
Sometime this summer, chances are you're going to go on vacation. But what about your plants? How will they live without you? Their major enemies will be heat and moisture loss. But with some planning, you can be pretty confident that you will not come back to a garden or houseplant graveyard. Choose survivors --If you know you are going to be away for a week or more this summer, don't plant thirsty things such as impatiens. Smart owners of weekend homes who often leave their plants for weeks at a time rely on drought-tolerant species such as black-eyed Susans (rudbeckia)
FEATURES
January 5, 1997
My African violets are becoming distorted and gnarly. What's going on?Cyclamen mites are the likely culprit.The mites attack a variety of houseplants. Besides African violets and cyclamens, these include begonias and kalanchoes. Leaves on infected plants often become brittle and change from green to bronze, gray or tan. Buds will often fail to open, and when they do, flowers will be small and distorted.Isolate infested plants immediately and throw out any that are badly damaged. Spray salvageable plants with a miticide or insecticide that is labeled for use on cyclamen mites and houseplants.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | February 2, 1992
Mike Klingaman's garden column, The Real Dirt, has been uprooted from the features pages of the Saturday Sun and transplanted to Sun Magazine. For the last seven years, Mike has introduced readers to the plants and animals that inhabit his Carroll County homestead, including Katydid, the asparagus-eating dog, and his fifth-grade sidekick, Beth, who believes boy seeds grow up to be vegetables and girl seeds grow up to be flowers. Among the collection of Mike's characters is the subject of today's reflection, the Man With 600 HungryHouseplants.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | January 16, 1993
Around the house* When taking down pictures to paint walls, insert a thumb tack into the hole. Paint over tack and then remove when wall is dry. The unpainted circles will indicate where to rehang wall accessories.* Do not soak knife blades in water. Instead, hand-wash and dry them immediately.* Use an empty squeeze bottle filled with frosting to decorate cookies or a birthday cake.* Keep a bottle of a stain pretreater near hamper so stains can be tackled when soiled laundry is deposited.
NEWS
October 8, 2006
TODAY OLMSTED WALKING TOUR Take a walk through Roland Park and learn about the homes in the neighborhood with tour leaders Judy Dobbs and Janet Felsten, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. today. Meet outside the Tuxedo Pharmacy at 5115 Roland Ave. at 12:45 p.m. Tour is sponsored by Friends of Maryland's Olmsted Parks and Landscapes Inc. Rain or shine. $15. 410-256-2180. TODAY THROUGH NOV. 5 DECORATORS' SHOW HOUSE The National Symphony Orchestra Decorators' Show House will take place today through Nov. 5 at the brick Georgian house Ayrlawn in Potomac.
FEATURES
By DETROIT FREE PRESS | January 7, 2006
Some people like houseplants that resemble the leafy green stuff that grows outside every summer. Others pick plants that look - well, weird. In ways big and small, these "weird" plants - succulents such as aloe, jade and cacti - are gaining younger fans enticed by the plants' exotic looks and inspired by interior designers who use them like sculptures. Succulents adorn the cover of the 2001 book Hip Houseplants (DK, $22). They show up on Bravo TV's Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, too, where designer Thom Filicia often uses them as accessories during room makeovers.
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 1, 2005
I brought my peace lilies indoors weeks ago for the winter, and now their young leaves have holes in them. I see webbing in the plant base and slime stuff as well. I can't find what is doing the munching. Examine houseplants carefully before bringing them indoors. A sharp water spray helps dislodge many potential pests such as mites. Your peace lilies likely harbor slugs. Slugs hide in soil and leaf litter and come out at night to feed, leaving slime behind. Try the usual slug control methods, such as a small dish of beer to drown them or an empty grapefruit half, which provides a dark, moist hiding place to lure them so you can catch them.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2004
Surrounded by lush plants, Leah Boston picks up a green snip of Swedish ivy. Slowly and carefully, she presses its end into a plastic cell of potting mix. Boston is among about two dozen people propagating and nurturing plants in the greenhouses of the nonprofit Providence Center. The Millersville-based center operates programs for developmentally disabled adults in Anne Arundel County. Tucked down a slope in Arnold, the horticulture workshop is not widely known, though it is one of the 43-year-old Providence Center's oldest and sells plants to the public, said Leslie B. Mathieson, horticulture production manager.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | December 14, 2003
Ferns -- frilly, feathery, leathery, and even microscopic -- have been happily going forth and multiplying since the Primordial Ooze. But it was the Victorians who finally brought them to horticultural superstar status. Everyone who was anyone had at least one Cousin It-like plant on a pedestal. Some of the more smitten -- or competitive -- Victorians even built glass-enclosed ferneries that they crammed with the choicest specimens available. In addition to being coveted houseplants, ferns were also garden staples.
NEWS
By Beth Botts and Beth Botts,Chicago Tribune | December 7, 2003
Your home, with its warm, dry air and handsome window treatments, may be a delight for people. But to a houseplant, it can be a hostile environment. Many of the plants we like to grow indoors hail from tropical, subtropical or desert lands where they evolved to need more light and much better drainage than they typically get in the living room. A plant that comes from a moist rain forest can have a hard time in the dry air of a centrally heated apartment. So how can you help plants survive in your home?
FEATURES
By DETROIT FREE PRESS | January 7, 2006
Some people like houseplants that resemble the leafy green stuff that grows outside every summer. Others pick plants that look - well, weird. In ways big and small, these "weird" plants - succulents such as aloe, jade and cacti - are gaining younger fans enticed by the plants' exotic looks and inspired by interior designers who use them like sculptures. Succulents adorn the cover of the 2001 book Hip Houseplants (DK, $22). They show up on Bravo TV's Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, too, where designer Thom Filicia often uses them as accessories during room makeovers.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2004
Surrounded by lush plants, Leah Boston picks up a green snip of Swedish ivy. Slowly and carefully, she presses its end into a plastic cell of potting mix. Boston is among about two dozen people propagating and nurturing plants in the greenhouses of the nonprofit Providence Center. The Millersville-based center operates programs for developmentally disabled adults in Anne Arundel County. Tucked down a slope in Arnold, the horticulture workshop is not widely known, though it is one of the 43-year-old Providence Center's oldest and sells plants to the public, said Leslie B. Mathieson, horticulture production manager.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | January 20, 2002
When I was in college, my mother, who spent the better part of 20 years trying to turn me into a gardener, gave me a potted shoot from her beefsteak begonia (Begonia 'Erythrophylla'). It was a smart move. The plant was not only seductively gorgeous -- with pink fairy-bell flowers and dark green lilypad leaves whose undersides were the color of raw meat (hence the beefsteak name) -- but it was also almost maintenance-free. For two decades, I hauled it around, shoved it into east-facing windows, repotted it when I felt inspired, neglected it when I was overwhelmed, and appreciated it inordinately.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | September 30, 2001
It's one of those end-of-summer rituals -- like buying school clothes or stowing the barbecue. Bringing in the plants. With the exception of the giant aloe that lives in the kitchen year-round, all my houseplants spend the summer outdoors. It's good for them and me. In summers like this one, they drink rainwater, and I enjoy the grace notes they add by the garden benches and perennial borders. Some of these plants -- like the hemstitch begonia and the rose geraniums -- have made the spring / fall transition for years.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.