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By Susan McGrath and Susan McGrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 26, 1991
So your shelves are lined with products that say DANGER! CAUTION! WARNING! and other little hints like that, but you paid for them, by gum, and you are going to use them.Or maybe you bought that one can of incredibly toxic paint stripper because you can't find anything else to do the job. Or you have to have this tube of killer glue because it's just too embarrassing to go around with bent paper clips in your eyeglasses.Fine. For you Must Haves, here are some tips about how to use toxic household products with minimum impact on your health and on the health of those around you.* Buy the smallest amount needed for the job. You don't want any extra lying around the house, and you may be legally required to dispose of leftovers as household hazardous waste.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
Household-product maker Sun Products said it will lay off 53 people next month at its manufacturing plant on Holabird Avenue in Southeast Baltimore. Spokeswoman Kathryn Corbally said the cuts, planned for May 13, are a result of the Connecticut-based company "realigning the manufacture of products with the customer base. " She wouldn't specify which products. The company's brands include laundry detergents such as all and Wisk, fabric softeners and dish detergent. Gerry Setley, vice president of the International Chemical Workers Union Council, which represents many of the plant's 350 workers, said the company is shifting its laundry detergent production across North America.
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BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1998
Black & Decker Corp.'s shares jumped more than 2 percent yesterday after analysts said the Towson-based company fetched a strong price for its Western Hemisphere household products business.The company announced the $315 million sale of its ailing household products business -- excluding its lighting and cleaning lines -- to Windmere Durable Holdings Inc. on Monday ** after the stock market closed. Yesterday, Black & Decker shares jumped as high as $55.25 -- a 52-week high -- before settling at $54.875, up $1.3125.
FEATURES
December 18, 2012
Leather couch needs a face-lift before the holidays I am expecting lots of company this holiday season, and my leather couch isn't up to the task. Short of buying all new, do you have any tips on how I can hide or repair the damage? Should I just throw a sheet over it? The people at Fibrenew, which specializes in the repair and restoration of leather, offer this advice: Don't use any products that contain alcohol or acetone. Alcohol seeps into and damages the protective surface of furniture leather.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1998
Black & Decker Corp. said yesterday that it has agreed to sell its household products business in the Western Hemisphere to Windmere Durable Holdings Inc. for $315 million.The sale includes items like Black & Decker's Spacemaker appliances and Toast-R-Ovens, but excludes its lighting and cleaning lines, including the Towson-based company's Dustbuster and SnakeLight lines."We are undergoing a strategic repositioning of the company that entails focusing on our core businesses, while divesting what we consider to be nonstrategic ones," said Black & Decker spokeswoman Barbara Lucas.
FEATURES
By Ron Gasbarro | March 2, 1991
What do you do with the hazardous wastes contained in common household products?If you are like many homeowners, your philosophy may well be, out of sight, out of mind. But what happens when you're spring cleaning and want to get rid of that old motor oil, antifreeze or leftover insect repellent? It's one thing to bag your trash and leave it for the truck to haul away; it's quite another to pour motor oil down the storm drain in front of your house.Remarkably, according to Eleanor Falk from the Governor's Chesapeake Bay Communications Office, "one quart of motor oil can cause an eight-acre oil slick."
NEWS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1998
Black & Decker Corp. said yesterday that it would pull the plug on its struggling U.S. household products unit and eliminate 3,000 jobs companywide in a cost-cutting plan intended to boost profits.The Towson-based company plans to sell the business that brought the Dustbuster and SnakeLight into millions of American homes.Black & Decker said the other job cuts -- 10 percent of its work force -- would come mostly from international operations.Black & Decker's 2,700 Maryland employees are not expected to be significantly affected.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1998
Black & Decker Corp. has closed on the sale of its household products business in North America and Latin America, excluding Brazil, to Windmere-Durable Holdings Inc. for $315 million.The Towson-based company said yesterday that it will transfer its household products manufacturing plants in Mexico as soon as it gets final regulatory approval there.Though it is shedding items such as the Spacemaker appliances and Toast-R-Ovens, the company will keep its lighting and cleaning products, including the Dustbuster cordless vacuum.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | November 24, 1999
WITH MANY high-tech stocks in the stratosphere, have you considered buying "down-to-earth" household products stocks?"Household products issues have appeal," says S&P Outlook. "Despite slow growth in the U.S., new products and expanding overseas markets make many of them worth buying."It suggests Church & Dwight Co. Inc., Clorox Co., Colgate-Palmolive Co., Dial Corp., Newell Rubbermaid Co., Procter & Gamble Co. and Tupperware Corp."In due time, higher bond yields are in order. The U.S. economy is strong and the only way to slow it down: higher interest rates," predicts Yamamoto Forecast.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1998
Black & Decker Corp. said yesterday that second-quarter earnings jumped 28 percent, boosted by a one-time gain from selling businesses and strong sales of its major products.For the three months that ended June 28, the Towson-based company reported net income of $58.4 million, up from $45.5 million in the year-ago period. Earnings per share increased 30 percent, to 61 cents on a diluted basis from 47 cents in 1997.Without the gain of $4.2 million, or 4 cents per share -- mostly from the sale of the company's Western Hemisphere household products business -- Black & Decker net earnings increased 19 percent to $54.2 million.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 20, 2008
Worried about the economy? Perhaps your family should tighten its belt a bit. Stop using so much soap, for example. Don't clean the kitchen floor quite so frequently. Reduce your dog's food intake by one-fourth. All that probably won't happen. That's why investors during worrisome times often turn to the stocks of companies that produce household necessities. As A.G. Lafley, chief executive of Procter & Gamble Co., said of the recent slowing economy: "People are not reducing tooth-brushing incidence.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 12, 2007
Can I expect my shares of Sara Lee Corp. to show improvement in the near future? - R.F., via the Internet The global food, beverage and household products company, which spun off its Hanesbrands division to shareholders nearly a year ago, is still adapting to its makeover. Because it also shed a number of businesses in its international apparel, snack brands, domestic coffee and meat snack operations, it must convince investors that this smaller, more-centralized look suits it. At issue is whether everything is coming together quickly and effectively enough to merit the current stock price.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2002
At a recent meeting of about 200 manufacturers at the World Trade Center in Baltimore, this question was posed: How many people have heard of Unilever? Not a single hand went up. The company might not be a household word, but its products are in households across the country, and the $49 billion conglomerate operates a 500-person plant in Baltimore. The 50-acre plant is the sole source of the following products sold in the United States: liquid Wisk, all and Surf laundry detergents, and liquid Final Touch and Snuggle fabric softeners.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | March 17, 2002
What if your kitchen counters could smell like the herbs you cook with, and your sheets like fresh-cut grass? What if your household products were so decorative you wouldn't want to put them under the sink? For homemakers who like to pamper themselves with small touches of luxury and are willing to pay for them, manufacturers have come out with high-end lines that look as good as they clean and smell even better. They have names like Citrus Mint Ylang Ylang Dish Soap Liquid and Basil-Verbena Window Wash with Essential Oils.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 22, 2001
CINCINNATI - Procter & Gamble Co. agreed yesterday to acquire Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.'s Clairol unit for $4.95 billion to begin selling hair coloring, a market with sales growing twice as fast as household products. Clairol's Nice`n Easy, Natural Instincts and Miss Clairol brands will give Procter & Gamble the No. 2 position in the U.S. hair-color market. The cash acquisition is the biggest in Procter & Gamble's 164-year history and will add $1.6 billion in annual sales, the company said.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2000
A national expert on inhalant abuse will be the keynote speaker at tomorrow'sDrug Summit 2000 - "The Pathway to Heroin" - at 7 p.m. at Carroll Community College. "Inhalants, the Household High" is a specialty topic for Isabel Burk, a mother, popular speaker and researcher. She also is director of Health Network, a New York training and consulting firm, and chairwoman of the American School Health Association's Council on Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs. The summit, the county's third, grew from concerns about youth heroin abuse after the overdose death of a Westminster teen-ager several years ago. Those concerns also led to a well-publicized countywide anti-drug effort and spawned Residents Attacking Drugs, a grass-roots community group that drew national attention with its video, "Heroin Kills."
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1998
Sunbeam Corp. yesterday announced plans to buy three companies for $2.5 billion -- deals that analysts said appear to rule out a purchase of Towson-based Black & Decker Corp."
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1998
Black & Decker Corp.'s plan to sell household, golf club shaft and glass-container machinery businesses signals the 88-year-old Towson-based company's return to its hardware roots.The moves by the company that developed the first portable electric drill are part of a broad restructuring plan announced last week. The plan also includes about 3,000 layoffs -- 10 percent of the company's work force -- mostly from international operations.The changes mark Black & Decker's exit from the last of its "noncore" businesses -- many of which were acquired and built over the last two decades as the company entered businesses foreign to its power tool heritage.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | November 24, 1999
WITH MANY high-tech stocks in the stratosphere, have you considered buying "down-to-earth" household products stocks?"Household products issues have appeal," says S&P Outlook. "Despite slow growth in the U.S., new products and expanding overseas markets make many of them worth buying."It suggests Church & Dwight Co. Inc., Clorox Co., Colgate-Palmolive Co., Dial Corp., Newell Rubbermaid Co., Procter & Gamble Co. and Tupperware Corp."In due time, higher bond yields are in order. The U.S. economy is strong and the only way to slow it down: higher interest rates," predicts Yamamoto Forecast.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1998
Black & Decker Corp. said yesterday that second-quarter earnings jumped 28 percent, boosted by a one-time gain from selling businesses and strong sales of its major products.For the three months that ended June 28, the Towson-based company reported net income of $58.4 million, up from $45.5 million in the year-ago period. Earnings per share increased 30 percent, to 61 cents on a diluted basis from 47 cents in 1997.Without the gain of $4.2 million, or 4 cents per share -- mostly from the sale of the company's Western Hemisphere household products business -- Black & Decker net earnings increased 19 percent to $54.2 million.
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