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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
Household incomes in Maryland slipped slightly in 2009, but the state fared far better than most as the recession dragged on, according to figures released Tuesday by the Census Bureau. Data from the American Community Survey found that median household income in Maryland decreased from $69,844 in 2008 to $69,272 last year. In another sign of the effects of the deep recession that economists have declared over, the proportion of Maryland families living below the poverty line last year rose to 9.1 percent in 2009 from 8 percent, a rise of about 63,000 people.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
More than five years into the economic recovery, many Maryland households still aren't feeling the lift. Overall personal income - including wages, investment income and payments from programs such as Social Security - grew an estimated 1 percent in the second quarter of 2014 in Maryland, compared to 2.5 percent in the United States as a whole. That showing - the fifth worst of all the states - followed four years of statewide incomes lagging behind the rest of the country, driven by a lack of growth in job-related income, according to an analysis the state's Department of Planning published last week.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 6, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The poverty rate fell in 1994 for the first time in four years, the Census Bureau reported yesterday, but median income remained stuck -- a sign that gains from a surging economy are not getting through to all middle-class households.The census also found that nearly one in seven Americans -- 39.7 million people -- lacked health insurance in 1994, about the same as the previous year.Single mothers and black families gained ground in 1994, but full-time workers and single people living alone were losers.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
A year ago, it was difficult for taxpayers to do last-minute tax planning because of uncertainty surrounding expiring tax breaks from the Bush era. Lawmakers were at loggerheads on which, if any, deductions and credits to keep and whether to let tax rates rise. This year, uncertainty isn't a problem. The American Taxpayer Relief Act, signed into law in January, has left taxes much the same for households with incomes less than $250,000. And for those with income above that, the tax landscape is clear, too: They will owe Uncle Sam more.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2000
Maryland had the highest median household income and the lowest poverty rate in the nation during the past two years, the U.S. Census Bureau said yesterday. Household earnings rose to $51,715 according to combined data from 1998 and 1999, meaning that half of all Maryland households earned more, and half earned less. The national two-year median was $40,280. At the same time, the percentage of Marylanders in poverty was 7.2 percent, down from 7.8 percent during the previous two-year period.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | July 24, 1992
MITCHELLVILLE -- Oliver and Frances Henderson have all the suburban trappings a couple in their mid-30s might want: the five-bedroom, $250,000 brick home on a quiet Prince George's County cul-de-sac, the lush lawn, the two cars and the two careers to pay for it all.They're black, they're proud -- and they're prosperous. And they are not alone.According to newly released census figures, Maryland has the nation's most affluent and highly educated black population.Of all states that were at least 10 percent black or had a black population of more than 1 million, Maryland ranked No. 1 with a median black household income of $30,746.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 27, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Household income rose in 1995 for the first time in six years, the Census Bureau reported yesterday, as the number of poor people in the United States dropped by more than 1.6 million, reaching historic lows for blacks and the elderly.The bureau said half the households in the country had incomes of at least $34,074, an increase of 2.7 percent over the previous year.The inflation-adjusted increase of $898 was the first rise inmedian household income since 1989, the year before the nation's last recession.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN REPORTER | August 29, 2007
It's the kind of statistic that makes politicians and economic development gurus cheer: Maryland ranked as the richest state in the nation last year, according to estimates released yesterday by the U.S. Census Bureau. The state's proximity to Washington's lucrative jobs, its abundance of workers with advanced degrees, and solid health and research opportunities in the Baltimore area continually keep Maryland at the peak of the economic charts, experts said. "We are able to access a level of job opportunities that are simply not available to the balance of the nation," said Anirban Basu, chief executive of the Baltimore economic consulting firm Sage Policy Group Inc. "That doesn't mean that Maryland doesn't have some degree of impoverishment in rural areas and in Baltimore City.
NEWS
By R. A. Zaldivar and R. A. Zaldivar,Knight-Ridder News Service Eileen Canzian of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | September 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- For the first time in eight years, the income of a typical U.S. household dropped in 1990, and the number of people in poverty rose for the first time in seven years, the Census Bureau reported yesterday.At the same time, the government also estimated that the number of people without health insurance rose by 1.3 million last year."Using all these indicators, economic well-being seems to be worse off," said Dan Weinberg, head of household statistics for the Census Bureau.While the national poverty rate climbed from 12.8 percent to 13.5 percent last year, the bureau estimated, roughly 9.9 percent of Marylanders were living in poverty then.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2001
When you tune in to Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous, don't expect to see Howard County. Palm Beach it isn't. But what Howard does claim is a lot of very comfortably well-off residents. So well-off, in fact, that only six counties in the nation have a higher median household income, according to Census Bureau 1998 wealth and poverty estimates released today. Howard County's median household income was a stunning $72,187, according to the estimates, which combine records such as tax returns with updated 1990 Census data.
NEWS
November 15, 2013
Your editorial absolutely missed the point concerning military retirees and taxes ( "No to tax breaks for military retirees," Nov. 12). It is larger than the military as well, so why not mention railroad retirees? This is simple math and I recommend you go to the VA website and pull down the by-state expenditures. You can compare macro veteran populations and payments. And when you do, you will see that states that exempt tax on retirement have significantly greater populations of veterans (like every Maryland neighbor)
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
Under the health reform law, everyone who files a federal income tax form is required to have insurance. Most employers also have to offer it. The idea is that for reform to work, everyone needs to enroll so that there is a good mix of healthy and sick people paying into and using the system. People can choose not to have insurance and companies can choose not to offer plans. But it will cost them. Analysts with The Hilltop Institute at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County explain the penalties for those who choose not to participate in reform.
NEWS
By David Wilson | May 13, 2013
I recently spoke at a seminar at Harvard on the theme of education as a civil right. Among other things, the seminar conveyed the urgency as well as the intractability of the problem of low college completion rates for certain groups of young people in our society. I directed my remarks toward the low college enrollment and graduation rates for students from families in the lower half of the income distribution. While other panelists noted how increasing numbers of racial and ethnic minorities could influence college enrollments, I noted that the low-income problem affected all groups.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2012
After three years of increases, the nation's poverty rate held steady from 2010 to 2011, according to data released Wednesday by the U.S. Census Bureau that also detailed trends in health insurance coverage and median income. Nationwide, 15 percent of people, or about 46.2 million individuals, lived below the poverty line in 2011, according to estimates in the Annual Social and Economic Supplement of the Census Bureau's Current Population Survey. Last year, the Census Bureau considered a family of two adults and two children in poverty if its annual household income was under $22,811.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | August 3, 2012
If you're a homeowner making $60,000 or less, you might qualify for help on your property taxes. But the deadline to apply is fast approaching. The Homeowners' Property Tax Credit , intended to help low- and moderate-income owners, caps the amount you must pay based on your income. The limit ranges from $4,380 as the maximum tab for eligible recipients making $60,000, all the way down to $0 for those with $8,000 or less in household income. The basic rules go like this: No more than $60,000 in total household income, and a net worth of less than $200,000 -- not including the value of the home and any qualified retirement savings.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | February 29, 2012
If you're not spending a bundle on housing costs but still feel pinched, you probably don't live close to your job. The Chicago-based Center for Neighborhood Technology says many places that appear affordable really aren't once you factor in transportation costs . Three out of four communities in the country have typical rent and home prices that don't require more than 30 percent of a typical household's income, a common affordability measure....
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2002
The chasm between Howard County's richest and poorest neighborhoods is widening. At the top in the state's wealthiest county is a census tract that includes most of Clarksville, where the median household earned $117,101 in 1999, according to new Census 2000 data. At the bottom are Ellicott City's neighborhoods bounded by U.S. 29, U.S. 40, Interstate 70 and the county line, where the median household earned $41,237. Those two census tracts held the same ranks 10 years earlier. But while both gained financially during the 1990s, Clarksville gained more - 15.5 percent compared with 5.5 percent in the Ellicott City tract, when adjusted for inflation.
NEWS
May 13, 1993
Taxpayers association reviews past yearThe first annual meeting of the Carroll County Taxpayers Association will be at 7:30 p.m. Monday in Room 07 of the County Office Building, 225 N. Center St., Westminster.The agenda will include a review of the past year's activities, plus election of a board of directors for the coming year.Information: 875-0576.Census shows incomes increasing in CarrollCarroll County's 1990 census figures show a 17.7 percent increase in the median household income from 1980 to 1990, the Baltimore Metropolitan Council reported this week.
NEWS
By David Gutman, Capital News Service special report | February 23, 2012
From 2008 to 2011, average monthly applications for food stamps in Baltimore increased by 66 percent, and applications for temporary cash assistance rose 35 percent, according to the Maryland Department of Human Resources. These numbers are the most dramatic of many that all tell the same story: The recession has hit middle- and low-income Baltimore residents hard. "We are seeing a whole new demographic of people: formerly middle-class people living middle-class lives who've lost their jobs and now are struggling to put food on the table," said Deborah Flateman, chief executive officer of the Maryland Food Bank.
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