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By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 10, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Decrying the Clinton administration's "culture of secrecy," the House committee investigating the White House travel office firings voted yesterday to bring criminal contempt of Congress charges against current and former White House aides for refusing to turn over requested documents.The 27-19 party-line vote came after the committee was informed that President Clinton would invoke executive privilege to protect the bulk of travel office documents not previously turned over to the panel.
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NEWS
By Helen Thomas | January 3, 2001
WASHINGTON - Having watched many chief executives take over the White House, I thought I might offer some unsolicited advice to the current president-elect. Not that George W. Bush needs it. He has returned enough has-beens to power to show him the ropes. But here goes: Read the fine print on important documents left by your predecessor. John F. Kennedy failed to do that on arriving in the Oval Office in 1961 and promptly signed off on the Dwight Eisenhower-Richard Nixon blueprint for the invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs.
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NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | May 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Striving to revive their lost momentum, President Clinton and his aides are mapping out a three-front battle plan to get his administration back on track, officials said yesterday.A solid week of embarrassing headlines caused by White House blunders, plummeting approval ratings and annoying 11th-hour opposition among Democrats to his economic package have left the president miffed at his own staff -- and determined to do better, these officials said."He's very unhappy about the process that allowed the White House travel office to dominate the news for a week," said one senior White House official.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In a surprising reversal, Whitewater special prosecutor Kenneth W. Starr announced yesterday that he would not investigate how the White House obtained 481 confidential FBI files, most of them on Republicans.Attorney General Janet Reno responded by ordering a "complete and thorough" investigation of her own, which would be conducted by the FBI. Republicans, noting that Reno could either have expanded Starr's mandate to include the file controversy or appointed an additional special prosecutor, questioned how independent she would be."
NEWS
By Boston Globe | May 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Bill Clinton prides himself on being the boy from Hope, Ark., the down-home Democrat who eschews the trappings of the Imperial Presidency.Nonetheless, the White House acknowledged yesterday, Mr. Clinton kept Air Force One sitting on the tarmac at Los Angeles International Airport on Tuesday while he treated himself to a haircut by Cristophe of Beverly Hills, hairdresser to the stars.Meanwhile, two of the airport's four runways were shut down for 56 minutes, delaying at least one commuter flight from Yuma, Ariz.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 19, 1996
CLINTON, Md. -- Inside a modest split-foyer home, Billy Dale's phone rings constantly, his wife tends alternately to their baby granddaughter and her husband's legal documents, and Mr. Dale narrates his travails at the hands of Bill and Hillary Rodham Clinton.These are the sights and sounds of vindication.Mr. Dale, who served in the administrations of eight presidents, speaks softly and with more hurt than bitterness.Nonetheless, his words have stung the administration that fired him, prosecuted him and continues to malign him and the job he performed as head of the White House travel office.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Never was the question of whose ox is being gored more pertinent than in the decision of Democrats to summarily shoot down a Republican bid in the House Judiciary Committee to have a congressional inquiry into the so-called Travelgate affair -- the suspension of seven employees in the White House travel office under unusual and suspicious circumstances.The same is likely to be the fate of Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole's request to Attorney General Janet Reno to appoint a special counsel to look into the matter.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 26, 1993
WASHINGTON--The tragic death of White House Deputy Counsel Vincent Foster, Bill Clinton's boyhood friend in Hope, Ark., adds a sorrowful personal dimension to the president's considerable political woes after six months in office.The nature of that death, an apparent suicide, brings into grim focus the pressures of the job not only on the man in the Oval Office but also on those around him given major responsibilities. While the reasons for the tragedy can only be speculated about at this point, many at the White House believe Foster simply took upon himself the blame for the many problems with presidential appointments that wounded his friend's first months of incumbency.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In appointing former Carter White House counsel Lloyd Cutler, one of Washington's certified political and legal wise men, to take over the same job from the departing Bernard Nussbaum, President Clinton is seeking to solve an internal White House problem that almost always arises in coping with a real or perceived scandal.When the trouble starts and intensifies, what usually happens is that the lawyers insist on clamming up and "protecting" the president. At the same time, the political advisers argue for "damage control" by putting out whatever can safely or reasonably be made public.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | September 8, 1993
THE Clinton administration is nothing if not ambitious. Just in the next several weeks, it plans to "reinvent government," pass the North American Free Trade Agreement (which is the one good initiative this administration has endorsed since taking office) and rework the entire health care system of the nation.The favorite word of the Clintonites is "manage." They want "managed competition" in health care (an increasingly empty phrase), they talk of "managed trade," and they think they can help defense-related industries "manage" the transition to non-defense products.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 10, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Decrying the Clinton administration's "culture of secrecy," the House committee investigating the White House travel office firings voted yesterday to bring criminal contempt of Congress charges against current and former White House aides for refusing to turn over requested documents.The 27-19 party-line vote came after the committee was informed that President Clinton would invoke executive privilege to protect the bulk of travel office documents not previously turned over to the panel.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 19, 1996
CLINTON, Md. -- Inside a modest split-foyer home, Billy Dale's phone rings constantly, his wife tends alternately to their baby granddaughter and her husband's legal documents, and Mr. Dale narrates his travails at the hands of Bill and Hillary Rodham Clinton.These are the sights and sounds of vindication.Mr. Dale, who served in the administrations of eight presidents, speaks softly and with more hurt than bitterness.Nonetheless, his words have stung the administration that fired him, prosecuted him and continues to malign him and the job he performed as head of the White House travel office.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In appointing former Carter White House counsel Lloyd Cutler, one of Washington's certified political and legal wise men, to take over the same job from the departing Bernard Nussbaum, President Clinton is seeking to solve an internal White House problem that almost always arises in coping with a real or perceived scandal.When the trouble starts and intensifies, what usually happens is that the lawyers insist on clamming up and "protecting" the president. At the same time, the political advisers argue for "damage control" by putting out whatever can safely or reasonably be made public.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | September 8, 1993
THE Clinton administration is nothing if not ambitious. Just in the next several weeks, it plans to "reinvent government," pass the North American Free Trade Agreement (which is the one good initiative this administration has endorsed since taking office) and rework the entire health care system of the nation.The favorite word of the Clintonites is "manage." They want "managed competition" in health care (an increasingly empty phrase), they talk of "managed trade," and they think they can help defense-related industries "manage" the transition to non-defense products.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 26, 1993
WASHINGTON--The tragic death of White House Deputy Counsel Vincent Foster, Bill Clinton's boyhood friend in Hope, Ark., adds a sorrowful personal dimension to the president's considerable political woes after six months in office.The nature of that death, an apparent suicide, brings into grim focus the pressures of the job not only on the man in the Oval Office but also on those around him given major responsibilities. While the reasons for the tragedy can only be speculated about at this point, many at the White House believe Foster simply took upon himself the blame for the many problems with presidential appointments that wounded his friend's first months of incumbency.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Never was the question of whose ox is being gored more pertinent than in the decision of Democrats to summarily shoot down a Republican bid in the House Judiciary Committee to have a congressional inquiry into the so-called Travelgate affair -- the suspension of seven employees in the White House travel office under unusual and suspicious circumstances.The same is likely to be the fate of Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole's request to Attorney General Janet Reno to appoint a special counsel to look into the matter.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In a surprising reversal, Whitewater special prosecutor Kenneth W. Starr announced yesterday that he would not investigate how the White House obtained 481 confidential FBI files, most of them on Republicans.Attorney General Janet Reno responded by ordering a "complete and thorough" investigation of her own, which would be conducted by the FBI. Republicans, noting that Reno could either have expanded Starr's mandate to include the file controversy or appointed an additional special prosecutor, questioned how independent she would be."
NEWS
By Helen Thomas | January 3, 2001
WASHINGTON - Having watched many chief executives take over the White House, I thought I might offer some unsolicited advice to the current president-elect. Not that George W. Bush needs it. He has returned enough has-beens to power to show him the ropes. But here goes: Read the fine print on important documents left by your predecessor. John F. Kennedy failed to do that on arriving in the Oval Office in 1961 and promptly signed off on the Dwight Eisenhower-Richard Nixon blueprint for the invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | May 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Striving to revive their lost momentum, President Clinton and his aides are mapping out a three-front battle plan to get his administration back on track, officials said yesterday.A solid week of embarrassing headlines caused by White House blunders, plummeting approval ratings and annoying 11th-hour opposition among Democrats to his economic package have left the president miffed at his own staff -- and determined to do better, these officials said."He's very unhappy about the process that allowed the White House travel office to dominate the news for a week," said one senior White House official.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau Nelson Schwartz contributed to this article | May 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Four days ago, when the entire White House travel office was fired, top Clinton administration officials turned to a 25-year-old Arkansas travel agent to come in and take charge.White House officials asserted that the seven-member travel office was guilty of shoddy bookkeeping and gross financial mismanagement. The fired employees responded that they had been moved out so the Clintonites could consolidate control with one of their own.What no one disputes is that the young woman brought in to head the office is a distant relative of President Clinton.
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