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By Stephanie Desmon, Greg Garland and Gus G. Sentementes and Stephanie Desmon, Greg Garland and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2004
The men who burned a Charles County development of half-million-dollar homes met before dawn in the parking lot of a nearby Wendy's restaurant, where they collected their gas cans and drove together to the site, kicking in doors and methodically setting house after house ablaze, according to court documents released yesterday. The papers say one of the men charged in the $10 million arson gave a detailed account of how four of them - and unidentified others - spent the early morning of Dec. 6 planning and lighting the fires that damaged or destroyed 26 homes under construction in the Hunters Brooke subdivision near Indian Head.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 28, 2008
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Ethnically driven violence intensified in Kenya yesterday, and police officials said at least 19 people, including 11 children, were burned to death in a house by a mob. The country seems to be becoming increasingly unhinged, with even the Kenyan military, deployed for the first time, unable to stop the wave of revenge killings. More than 100 people have been killed in the past four days, many of them shot with arrows, burned or hacked with machetes. It is some of the worst fighting since a disputed election in December ignited long-simmering tensions that have so far claimed at least 750 lives.
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NEWS
December 23, 2001
This year at Christmastime, people all over the world are united in spirit. It's also an opportune time for learning about the unique ways people in other countries celebrate Christmas. In GERMANY on the eve of Dec. 6, children place a shoe or boot by the fireplace. During the night, St. Nicholas goes from house to house carrying a "book of sins" in which all of the misdeeds of the children are written. If they have been good, he fills their shoe with delicious holiday edibles. If they haven't been good, their shoe is filled with twigs!
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 11, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - U.S. and Iraqi troops began a ground assault yesterday to root out pockets of insurgents in the northern city of Tal Afar, a militant stronghold that coalition forces have struggled to secure since Saddam Hussein's ouster in 2003. Several thousand coalition soldiers converged on the city, moving from house to house through insurgent-held neighborhoods. Of the 17 battalions involved in the offensive, all but three were made up of Iraqi troops. Though the all-out assault began yesterday, U.S. and Iraqi troops have ramped up their crackdown on insurgents in Tal Afar in recent days.
BUSINESS
By Bonita Dvorak Formwalt and Bonita Dvorak Formwalt,Contributing Writer | May 15, 1994
As a child, Charlotte Beam would read fairy tales of Cinderella and Rumpelstiltskin, visualizing their homes as quaint, cozy Cape Cods.As an adult, she and her husband, Earl, adopted the charm of that style when they built the home they would share for 35 years.Built in 1959 for $38,000, the four-bedroom house sits off Chatham Road, in Dunloggin in Ellicott City. Secluded by towering trees and evergreens, a delicate border of bamboo surrounds a front terrace."Following a summer shower, it's almost like being in a rain forest," says Mr. Beam, a retired administrator of Maryland General Hospital.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | January 1, 2005
FOR THE PAST three weeks I've been wandering all over town, from the most proper addresses to the old downtown streets at hours when the drunks are being thrown out of the bars. Along the way I've observed what Baltimore has done to itself over the past year. I've gained weight from all the parties, sometimes I've been weary, but I still delight in an invitation to an open door and a place to talk. The extended holiday season is my idea of a good time; when friends told me they were leaving Baltimore to celebrate New Year's at Rehoboth Beach, I thought to myself, you've got to be kidding.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
A suspect in arson fires that caused $10 million in damage to an upscale Charles County housing development last year pleaded guilty yesterday, saying he took part because he knew that African-Americans were buying many of the houses. Jeremy Daniel Parady, 21, of Accoceek pleaded guilty in federal court in Greenbelt to one count of conspiracy to commit arson in connection with the Dec. 6 fires at the Hunters Brooke subdivision near Indian Head. Charles County, which is predominantly white, has become a fast-growing bedroom community for people who work in Washington.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Richard Irwin and Peter Hermann and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2000
A gunman shot two people yesterday afternoon during a fight that spilled from an East Baltimore rowhouse and prompted police to shut down several streets as they searched for suspects. Two officers coaxed a 2-year-old child out of the rowhouse in the 1900 block of N. Patterson Park Ave. and carried the infant to safety. The child was the last person inside. One woman was hospitalized in critical but stable condition and a man was treated for a gunshot wound and released. Four men were in custody last night, including the suspected gunman.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 28, 2008
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Ethnically driven violence intensified in Kenya yesterday, and police officials said at least 19 people, including 11 children, were burned to death in a house by a mob. The country seems to be becoming increasingly unhinged, with even the Kenyan military, deployed for the first time, unable to stop the wave of revenge killings. More than 100 people have been killed in the past four days, many of them shot with arrows, burned or hacked with machetes. It is some of the worst fighting since a disputed election in December ignited long-simmering tensions that have so far claimed at least 750 lives.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 4, 2005
WAVELAND, MISS. -- When the Maryland rescue crew rode into this tiny seaside community before dawn Wednesday, the morning mist parted to reveal hundreds of cars on the side of the highway, all empty, as though the drivers had spontaneously pulled over to stretch their legs. "Where are all the people?" was all Melissa Hickerson of Frederick could think. Yesterday morning, they found one of them: the body of an elderly man lying deep in the piney woods here, still strapped into a life vest that didn't help against a 20-foot surge of water.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Douglas Birch and Arthur Hirsch and Douglas Birch,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 5, 2005
NEW ORLEANS -- Rescue teams searched swamped street after street, house to house yesterday for those still living in this devastated city, as the U.S. health and human services secretary estimated that Hurricane Katrina and the flood that followed killed thousands. The magnitude of the total loss has so far only been hinted at by the sight of bodies lying in city streets and floating in brown waters, and by reports of survivors too elderly, frail or ill to leave their homes. While some survivors continued to resist evacuation by troopers, police and the Coast Guard scouring neighborhoods by helicopter, boat and truck, one official of a neighboring parish broke into tears on television pleading for just this kind of help.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 4, 2005
WAVELAND, MISS. -- When the Maryland rescue crew rode into this tiny seaside community before dawn Wednesday, the morning mist parted to reveal hundreds of cars on the side of the highway, all empty, as though the drivers had spontaneously pulled over to stretch their legs. "Where are all the people?" was all Melissa Hickerson of Frederick could think. Yesterday morning, they found one of them: the body of an elderly man lying deep in the piney woods here, still strapped into a life vest that didn't help against a 20-foot surge of water.
NEWS
By Solomon Moore and Solomon Moore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 10, 2005
RIBAT, Iraq - The casualties mounted yesterday in remote desert villages near the Syrian border as U.S. troops launched their largest offensive since last year's invasion of Fallujah. Insurgents have killed at least three Marines and wounded 20 more trying to cross the Euphrates River in western Iraq. Marine commanders estimate they have killed more than 100 guerrillas since the offensive began Sunday. The Marines say that capturing or killing insurgents in these villages is key to pacifying Iraq.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
A suspect in arson fires that caused $10 million in damage to an upscale Charles County housing development last year pleaded guilty yesterday, saying he took part because he knew that African-Americans were buying many of the houses. Jeremy Daniel Parady, 21, of Accoceek pleaded guilty in federal court in Greenbelt to one count of conspiracy to commit arson in connection with the Dec. 6 fires at the Hunters Brooke subdivision near Indian Head. Charles County, which is predominantly white, has become a fast-growing bedroom community for people who work in Washington.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | January 1, 2005
FOR THE PAST three weeks I've been wandering all over town, from the most proper addresses to the old downtown streets at hours when the drunks are being thrown out of the bars. Along the way I've observed what Baltimore has done to itself over the past year. I've gained weight from all the parties, sometimes I've been weary, but I still delight in an invitation to an open door and a place to talk. The extended holiday season is my idea of a good time; when friends told me they were leaving Baltimore to celebrate New Year's at Rehoboth Beach, I thought to myself, you've got to be kidding.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon, Greg Garland and Gus G. Sentementes and Stephanie Desmon, Greg Garland and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2004
The men who burned a Charles County development of half-million-dollar homes met before dawn in the parking lot of a nearby Wendy's restaurant, where they collected their gas cans and drove together to the site, kicking in doors and methodically setting house after house ablaze, according to court documents released yesterday. The papers say one of the men charged in the $10 million arson gave a detailed account of how four of them - and unidentified others - spent the early morning of Dec. 6 planning and lighting the fires that damaged or destroyed 26 homes under construction in the Hunters Brooke subdivision near Indian Head.
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON and GARLAND L. THOMPSON,Garland L. Thompson write editorials for The Sun | December 28, 1991
With the Christmas excitement safely past and New Year's not quite begun, now is the season for remembering. Especially with ''White Christmas'' still pealing from many a stereo and Natalie Cole's hot, dubbed-in duet with her father reminding everyone of just why they called him Nat ''King'' Cole.We had a few white Christmases when I was growing up in Chester, Pa., during which I checked frantically to find any sleigh and hoof tracks that might be lurking on the roof. But even if the snow didn't come small children like me expected Santa to bring the goodies.
NEWS
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 2002
When you're born in paradise, there's no reason to ever leave." That's the sentiment of David Craig, mayor of Havre de Grace, a scenic waterfront community on the Susquehanna River with a rich history that inspires fierce loyalty in longtime residents and newcomers alike. "It's the land that time forgot," joked Craig, whose family has lived in Havre de Grace since the 1600s. "Houses here are passed on from generation to generation," he said. He and his wife, Melinda, live in a 160-year-old house within blocks of two of their three children.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 29, 2004
WASHINGTON - As Marines prepare to head back into the rebellious Iraqi city of Fallujah, the stage is set for the most dreaded type of ground combat: urban warfare. While military officers and civilian officials held out hope that negotiations could produce a peaceful resolution to the standoff, they stressed that force might well be necessary. Fallujah could then pose the type of nightmare scenario that U.S. commanders expected to encounter in Baghdad last year. Some military officers and defense analysts feared that Saddam Hussein's soldiers would pull back into the city, set fire to oil-filled trenches and fire at U.S. troops from a warren of buildings and alleyways.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 24, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A chemistry professor is shot to death by the gates of his university. A well-known singer of songs praising Saddam Hussein is gunned down outside his home. The mother of a young woman involved in a bitter divorce is killed in her driveway. Killers are roaming the streets of this city, and no one is pursuing them in what has become open season for settling old scores. For anyone bitter at his treatment by a former government official, a boss, even a family member, this has become the best of all times for carrying out dreams of revenge.
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