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By New York Times News Service | August 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- FBI agents interviewed White House staff members Thursday afternoon about a delay in the handling of a torn-up note written by Vincent W. Foster Jr., the White House aide who was found dead July 20, a Justice Department spokesman said yesterday.The FBI lent some agents to the U.S. Park Police to try to learn why the note, found Monday in Mr. Foster's briefcase by a colleague, was not given to the Park Police until Tuesday night, said Carl Stern, the spokesman.The Park Police are investigating the circumstances of Mr. Foster's death from a gunshot wound in a roadside park in suburban Virginia.
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NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2005
WASHINGTON - Steroid use by players in the National Football League may be more widespread than tests have indicated, according to congressional staff members investigating the league's drug-testing program. The House Government Reform Committee has been conducting interviews with "credible insiders" as part of an investigation leading to tomorrow's hearing on the league's steroid policy. As a result of those interviews - along with the recent report that three Carolina Panthers purchased steroids before the Super Bowl in 2004 - committee staff members say they are concerned that steroid testing may understate the problem.
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NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2005
WASHINGTON - Steroid use by players in the National Football League may be more widespread than tests have indicated, according to congressional staff members investigating the league's drug-testing program. The House Government Reform Committee has been conducting interviews with "credible insiders" as part of an investigation leading to tomorrow's hearing on the league's steroid policy. As a result of those interviews - along with the recent report that three Carolina Panthers purchased steroids before the Super Bowl in 2004 - committee staff members say they are concerned that steroid testing may understate the problem.
NEWS
By Jeff Zeleny and Jeff Zeleny,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 29, 2004
NEW YORK - The White House has issued a stern warning to administration officials attending the Republican convention: Don't misbehave at all-night cocktail parties, steer clear of corporate skybox tickets to the Yankees game and politely say no thanks to a gift if it costs more than $20. Lest they forget, the White House counsel printed a list of the top 10 rules on wallet-size cards and distributed them to scores of employees - from Cabinet officials to...
NEWS
January 29, 1998
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun incorrectly reported when former White House aide Mary Ellen Glynn learned of the reasons for Monica Lewinsky's transfer from the White House staff to the Pentagon. Glynn did not learn of the details of the transfer until this year.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 1/29/98
NEWS
August 16, 1993
There are times when the nation's capital takes on some of the attributes of a shark tank at feeding time. That is one of the complaints left behind in some notes by Vincent W. Foster Jr., the deputy White House counsel who committed suicide. Reviewing the brouhaha in the White House travel office, Mr. Foster makes some vague accusations and offers a flimsy defense of White House staff behavior. These are deserving of some attention, but Mr. Foster's remarks about life in Washington raise a more substantial issue.
NEWS
May 26, 1993
The flap over the White House travel office is serious if the White House staff tried to oust career employees without just cause. It is serious if the White House staff suggested criminal transgressions when there was no evidence of that. It appears both those things happened, but the full story is not known. At this point, we suggest reserving judgment.But the full story -- or at least enough of it -- is known concerning the White House staff's improper use of the Federal Bureau of Investigation in this affair, and that is very serious indeed.
NEWS
November 29, 1991
A recent White House ceremony that should have been as joyous as a wedding turned out to be a somber as a funeral. The occasion was the signing of the 1991 Civil Rights Act. Passage of the bill by lopsided margins in the House and Senate culminated a two-year effort. Sen. John Danforth, R-Mo., and Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., displayed great patience, tenacity and willingness to compromise to work out the final version. President Bush also agreed to give a little to get a little.But on the day before the ceremony, the White House staff sent out a "signing statement" to cabinet members and other administration executives in which the preposterous and, frankly, mean-spirited, too-clever-by-half orders were given that the bill "requires that Executive branch agencies immediately terminate all regulations, rules and programs of whatever nature that may be inconsistent with the new law or with the principle of discouraging quotas and unfair preferences."
NEWS
By Jeff Zeleny and Jeff Zeleny,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 29, 2004
NEW YORK - The White House has issued a stern warning to administration officials attending the Republican convention: Don't misbehave at all-night cocktail parties, steer clear of corporate skybox tickets to the Yankees game and politely say no thanks to a gift if it costs more than $20. Lest they forget, the White House counsel printed a list of the top 10 rules on wallet-size cards and distributed them to scores of employees - from Cabinet officials to...
NEWS
By Tom Brune and Tom Brune,NEWSDAY | March 5, 2004
WASHINGTON - The federal grand jury probing the leak of a covert CIA officer's identity has subpoenaed records of Air Force One telephone calls in the week before the officer's name was published in a column in July, according to documents obtained by Newsday. Also sought in the wide-ranging document requests contained in three grand jury subpoenas to the Executive Office of President Bush are records created in July by the White House Iraq Group, a little-known internal task force established in August 2002 to create a strategy to publicize the threat posed by Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
By Tom Brune and Tom Brune,NEWSDAY | March 5, 2004
WASHINGTON - The federal grand jury probing the leak of a covert CIA officer's identity has subpoenaed records of Air Force One telephone calls in the week before the officer's name was published in a column in July, according to documents obtained by Newsday. Also sought in the wide-ranging document requests contained in three grand jury subpoenas to the Executive Office of President Bush are records created in July by the White House Iraq Group, a little-known internal task force established in August 2002 to create a strategy to publicize the threat posed by Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration pursued a two-track political strategy yesterday to minimize the damage from the criminal investigation into the disclosure of a CIA officer's identity. The White House encouraged Republicans to portray the former diplomat at the center of the case, Joseph C. Wilson IV, as a partisan Democrat with an agenda and the Democratic Party as scandal-mongering. At the same time, the administration and Republican leadership on Capitol Hill worked to ensure that no Republicans in Congress will break ranks and call for an independent inquiry outside direct Justice Department control.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1999
ST. MICHAEL'S -- They gathered at the secluded Harbourtowne Gulf Resort and Conference Center in this Eastern Shore community.It was a 2 1/2-day retreat for 54 supervisors from the Housing Authority of Baltimore City, the quasi-public housing agency funded largely with federal funds.Housing officials said the $13,446 trip -- paid for by the agency -- was designed to lay out a strategy for implementing recommendations for the city's public housing communities.But Mayor-elect Martin O'Malley questioned the prudence of a lame-duck administrator taking his staff on such a getaway a month before he leaves the job."
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1999
Annapolis Housing Authority employees will spend two hours immersed in the drug culture this morning, learning how a crack cocaine pipe can be crafted from a soda can and what a "Loveboat" is (marijuana sprinkled with PCP).Far from being illegal, the drug and paraphernalia class has been ordered by their boss, Patricia Croslan. And their instructor -- Annapolis City Police Lt. Robert E. Beans -- is on the right side of the law."It's of great importance for people to be able to identify drug paraphernalia, particularly when they work in an environment where they might come across it," said Croslan, the Housing Authority director.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1999
Main street business owners aren't the only ones skeptical about Taneytown's plans to buy back the old city hall -- Mayor W. Robert Flickinger also would prefer to look elsewhere in the quest for expanded quarters for municipal and police staff.But Councilman Henry C. Heine Jr. says the location couldn't be better -- adjacent to and across the street from three other city buildings. The price is right, too."I didn't want this building to begin with," said Flickinger, who is concerned about accessibility for handicapped residents, parking, the cost of renovation and whether the building is used for police or city hall staff.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | November 19, 1998
NOT SINCE the first Christian faced the lions in the Roman Coliseum has one man entered so dangerous an arena as independent counsel Kenneth Starr does when he appears before the House Judiciary Committee today. So here's my advice, Mr. Starr, based on my own experience having served on the Judiciary Committee staff during the Nixon impeachment inquiry and having testified before the committee numerous times.The most important thing to remember is that these hearings are not a trial before an impartial judge or jury expected to render a fair verdict based on the evidence.
NEWS
July 24, 1995
Rep. Roscoe Bartlett's call for congressional hearings into White House staff use of presidential helicopters is transparently political. If there is political mileage in beating up Bill Clinton, it will come out in Waco and Whitewater hearings and not some sideshow dealing with White House underlyings taking unauthorized helicopter joyrides.It's little wonder that Mr. Bartlett doesn't want to let go of this issue. The congressman, whose Western Maryland district includes Carroll County and western Howard County, was able to catapult himself into the national spotlight last year when he publicized a newspaper photograph showing a White House aide -- since fired -- boarding a military chopper after playing a round of golf at a Frederick area country club.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 14, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's opponents like to complain that his White House sometimes seems to be run by 19-year-olds. Today, they will be at least partly right.As part of the shutdown of the federal government forced by the budget deadlock between the president and Congress, most of Mr. Clinton's staff has been deemed "nonessential" and will be taking the time off.In their absence, much of the daily work around the president's office will be handled by college-age interns, who work at the White House for free and so are not affected by the budget squeeze.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | July 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- There may be less than meets the eye in the legal struggle over whether Secret Service agents shall be required to testify in the Monica Lewinsky case.The decision by the three federal appeals court judges supporting special prosecutor Kenneth Starr is likely to be appealed by the Department of Justice with the blessing of the White House. But legal experts believe there is little substance to the claim that the protective function of Secret Service would be compromised by denying such a privilege.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Ellen Gamerman and Susan Baer and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 5, 1998
WASHINGTON -- They are the ones who are in a position to know: Did first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton really throw a lamp at her husband as legend has it? Is President Clinton a midnight snacker? What's the first family really like behind closed doors?With access to the president second only to immediate family, the permanent staff of ushers, butlers, cooks, stewards and other White House domestic employees knows the secrets that lurk in the West Wing and executive mansion in any administration.
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