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NEWS
November 13, 1996
The Associated Press erroneously reported yesterday that Rep. Christopher Shays, a Connecticut Republican, has called for House Speaker Newt Gingrich to step aside until the House ethics committee completes its investigation of charges against him. Shays said he would not vote on the House floor for Gingrich as speaker in January unless the report of the ethics committee's independent counsel has been released by then.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 11/13/96
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | February 12, 2012
One of my favorite activities this primary season is to read the seemingly endless analyses of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich. The profiles run the gamut from glowing to scathing; just about every Washington pundit has a strong opinion of "Mr. Speaker. " Yet, most of the talking heads have not worked with the man or known him very well. I have worked with Newt, consider him a friend, but also understand the eccentricities of this fascinating leader. (I am also Maryland chairman of Mitt Romney's presidential campaign.)
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- House Speaker Newt Gingrich and House Republican leaders may draft their own version of tobacco legislation, a spokesman for a powerful House committee said yesterday.Gingrich said he believed that the Senate's tobacco bill, proposed by Sen. John McCain, an Arizona Republican, was too liberal to win approval in the House. He said it was "not a Republican bill," but "a very liberal, big government, big bureaucracy bill."The Senate proposal, which would raise more than $500 billion from the tobacco industry through cigarette taxes and give sweeping regulatory power to the Food and Drug Administration, "gives big government more money for more bureaucrats," Gingrich said in an interview broadcast yesterday on CNBC's "Tim Russert Show."
NEWS
December 28, 2000
WHAT WAS WRONG for former House Speaker Newt Gingrich is wrong for Sen.-elect Hillary Rodham Clinton, too. Ms. Clinton is off to a promising career as freshman senator from New York. She brings a razor-sharp mind, passion for issues and unique insights as life partner to a governor-president. So why smear the clean slate with a major blemish at the start? Ms. Clinton took an $8 million advance for a promised memoir of her White House years from Simon & Schuster. The publisher is a subsidiary of Viacom Inc., which also owns CBS, MTV, Comedy Central, Infinity Broadcasting, Paramount Pictures, Famous Music Publishing, Blockbuster Video and a bunch of movie screens, Web sites and theme parks.
NEWS
December 28, 2000
WHAT WAS WRONG for former House Speaker Newt Gingrich is wrong for Sen.-elect Hillary Rodham Clinton, too. Ms. Clinton is off to a promising career as freshman senator from New York. She brings a razor-sharp mind, passion for issues and unique insights as life partner to a governor-president. So why smear the clean slate with a major blemish at the start? Ms. Clinton took an $8 million advance for a promised memoir of her White House years from Simon & Schuster. The publisher is a subsidiary of Viacom Inc., which also owns CBS, MTV, Comedy Central, Infinity Broadcasting, Paramount Pictures, Famous Music Publishing, Blockbuster Video and a bunch of movie screens, Web sites and theme parks.
NEWS
July 23, 1997
HOW IRONIC that House Speaker Newt Gingrich, who came to power as the point man for a sweeping conservative agenda now finds himself under attack because he is not conservative enough to please Young Turks in the Republican caucus. Even more ironic is the spectacle of Mr. Gingrich turning to GOP moderates in the House for support to quell this palace revolt that nearly toppled him from power last week.As the speaker tries to bolster his position at the Republican caucus today, he faces a delicate balancing act. Conservatives are angry over his failure to seize the political initiative from President Clinton.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 19, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Republican leaders tried to kill, then chose to delay indefinitely, action on proposed changes in House ethics rules yesterday, clouding prospects for reforming a process critics say is tainted by partisanship.House Speaker Newt Gingrich, who was reprimanded and penalized $300,000 this year after a stormy ethics inquiry that sparked calls for reform, decided that lawmakers needed more time to study the proposed changes.The action upset the 12-member bipartisan task force, co-chaired by Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, a Baltimore Democrat, that worked for months to redefine the delicate procedures by which House members investigate and sit in judgment of one another.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2000
Michael Pack just wanted to do a documentary on a typical six-month period in the life of a Speaker of the House of Representatives. Fortunately, that's not what he got. Stumbling onto times that were far from typical, Pack's crew followed House Speaker Newt Gingrich during the weeks leading up to the impeachment vote against President Clinton, the 1998 congressional elections that resulted in a surprisingly poor showing for GOP candidates, and the...
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 13, 1995
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- House Speaker Newt Gingrich achieved even more than he had hoped for with his magical mystery tour of New Hampshire.He not only came face to face with a moose, he came face to face with the president, seeming to establish himself as Mr. Clinton's political equal by sharing the stage with him at Sunday's genteel town hall meeting.The speaker's four-day trip to New Hampshire, punctuated by the joint appearance with President Clinton, solidified Mr. Gingrich's standing as the dominant GOP force in the nation.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | January 10, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The understatement of the day came from John Kasich, the likable Ohio congressman who serves as one of House Speaker Newt Gingrich's loyal lieutenants. "It's just not fun," said Mr. Kasich.They have poisoned their own well, this new generation of weasel-word politicians. The majority party in the House of Representatives, the Republicans, having nothing better in mind, re-elected Mr. Gingrich as speaker, though he could not get a majority of the 435 votes in that body. That sort of evens him up with President Clinton, who could not get a majority of the nation's votes in his November "landslide" victory.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2000
Michael Pack just wanted to do a documentary on a typical six-month period in the life of a Speaker of the House of Representatives. Fortunately, that's not what he got. Stumbling onto times that were far from typical, Pack's crew followed House Speaker Newt Gingrich during the weeks leading up to the impeachment vote against President Clinton, the 1998 congressional elections that resulted in a surprisingly poor showing for GOP candidates, and the...
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 5, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Plans for a gala celebration of the fifth anniversary of the Republican takeover of Congress were squelched recently because no one knew what to do about former House Speaker Newt Gingrich.Gingrich virtually personifies the Republican revolution, as it was called. But he was deposed by his own troops last year and was later revealed to be having an affair that has embroiled him in a messy divorce."I can't imagine having an anniversary celebration without Newt. But if he came, he'd be the story, and no one would want to be in a picture with him," said Rep. Mark E. Souder, an Indiana Republican, reflecting the conflict among his colleagues.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writers David Folkenflik and Karen Hosler contributed to this article | November 7, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Needing a lawmaker with nerve enough to slash beloved federal programs, House Speaker Newt Gingrich plucked Rep. Bob Livingston out of the pack of Appropriations Committee members nearly four years ago and propelled him into the powerful and coveted chairman's seat.Yesterday, Livingston proved he had nerve enough -- and then some.The lanky, conservative Louisiana Republican announced he was challenging his former mentor -- "my dear friend, Newt Gingrich, my friend for the last 20 years" -- for the speaker's own job, prompting Gingrich only hours later to take the stunning step of resigning from Congress.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- House Speaker Newt Gingrich and House Republican leaders may draft their own version of tobacco legislation, a spokesman for a powerful House committee said yesterday.Gingrich said he believed that the Senate's tobacco bill, proposed by Sen. John McCain, an Arizona Republican, was too liberal to win approval in the House. He said it was "not a Republican bill," but "a very liberal, big government, big bureaucracy bill."The Senate proposal, which would raise more than $500 billion from the tobacco industry through cigarette taxes and give sweeping regulatory power to the Food and Drug Administration, "gives big government more money for more bureaucrats," Gingrich said in an interview broadcast yesterday on CNBC's "Tim Russert Show."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | July 28, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In the failed plotting to depose House Speaker Newt Gingrich, the one group of House Republicans without egg on their faces is the small collection of middle-roaders who call themselves the Mainstream Republicans.There are, according to their leader, Rep. Jim Leach of Iowa, about 40 of them in the House and a handful in the Senate, and Mr. Leach is quick to point out that the abandoned purge of Mr. Gingrich "was a challenge that came from the right of the party" -- the speaker's own people, not the self-styled Mainstreamers.
NEWS
July 23, 1997
HOW IRONIC that House Speaker Newt Gingrich, who came to power as the point man for a sweeping conservative agenda now finds himself under attack because he is not conservative enough to please Young Turks in the Republican caucus. Even more ironic is the spectacle of Mr. Gingrich turning to GOP moderates in the House for support to quell this palace revolt that nearly toppled him from power last week.As the speaker tries to bolster his position at the Republican caucus today, he faces a delicate balancing act. Conservatives are angry over his failure to seize the political initiative from President Clinton.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | July 28, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In the failed plotting to depose House Speaker Newt Gingrich, the one group of House Republicans without egg on their faces is the small collection of middle-roaders who call themselves the Mainstream Republicans.There are, according to their leader, Rep. Jim Leach of Iowa, about 40 of them in the House and a handful in the Senate, and Mr. Leach is quick to point out that the abandoned purge of Mr. Gingrich "was a challenge that came from the right of the party" -- the speaker's own people, not the self-styled Mainstreamers.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 9, 1997
I've been thinking about how to fix Social Security. Ordinarily, I focus on issues such as how to remove little pieces of pepperoni stuck between my teeth, and I leave government problems to the trained professionals in Washington (motto: "Overlooking The Obvious Since 1798").But they are frankly not getting the job done. President Clinton hasn't had time, what with all these pesky scandals, which have forced him to scale down his vision for his second term from "build a bridge to the 21st century" to "settle out of court."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 19, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Republican leaders tried to kill, then chose to delay indefinitely, action on proposed changes in House ethics rules yesterday, clouding prospects for reforming a process critics say is tainted by partisanship.House Speaker Newt Gingrich, who was reprimanded and penalized $300,000 this year after a stormy ethics inquiry that sparked calls for reform, decided that lawmakers needed more time to study the proposed changes.The action upset the 12-member bipartisan task force, co-chaired by Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, a Baltimore Democrat, that worked for months to redefine the delicate procedures by which House members investigate and sit in judgment of one another.
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