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By David Hess and David Hess,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 27, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Census Bureau made it official yesterday: Nearly all of the 19 seats in the 435-member House of Representatives that will shift in the Congress convening in 1993 will shift from Snow Belt to Sun Belt states.Three states -- California, Florida and Texas -- will pick up 14 of those seats, and their congressional delegations together, numbering 105 seats, will account for almost 25 percent of the House. That is up from 20 percent in the current Congress.Maryland's eight-seat delegation will stay the same.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser | February 25, 2014
Tiffany Alston, the former Prince George's County delegate who was ousted from her House seat in 2013 after a theft conviction, is running to get her old job back. Alston, a Democrat,  filed her candidacy papers Tuesday night to seek a seat in the 24th District, just minutes before the 9 p.m. deadline for getting on the ballot. The 36-year-old former lawmaker pleaded guilty in June 2012 to misconduct in office and the theft of $800 from her delegate office account to pay expenses of her law firm.
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NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 1, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Election Day is six months away, but Rep. Martin Frost wishes it were tomorrow.Armed with polls that show the Republican Congress still highly unpopular with the voters, Democrats like Mr. Frost are daring to dream of reclaiming the House of Representatives, which they lost in 1994 after 40 years of control."
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley and the ruling Democrats in Annapolis worked hard to draw a new congressional map that could force a Western Maryland Republican from office. But the result is such a contorted tangle of districts that even some Democrats have declined to support it. The Democratic Central Committees for Montgomery and Prince George's counties - the state's two largest - decided not to make a recommendation to voters about whether they should vote for the map, which is on the ballot in November.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
Buoyed by a growing Hispanic population and the availability of steady federal jobs, Maryland grew by 9 percent in the last decade - faster than most Eastern states, according to new Census Bureau data. Maryland's population grew by 480,000 residents, to 5,773,552, according to data released Tuesday. With a growth rate slightly lower than the national average, Maryland maintained its ranking as the nation's 19th-most-populous state - and retained its seats in the House of Representatives.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | April 1, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The new 1990 assignment of seats in the House of Representatives to the 50 states survived its first constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court yesterday, but another is to come later in the month.In a unanimous ruling, the justices upheld the 50-year-old mathematical formula that Congress devised to distribute House seats following each 10-year census.A special federal court in Montana had upset that plan temporarily last October by striking down the formula.However, the high court said that "Congress had ample power to enact" the particular formula that it chose in 1941, and to have it used automatically every decade since then.
NEWS
January 4, 1994
Republicans must feel good about their party's prospects in 1994. How else to explain the fact that more than twice as many Democrats as Republicans (8 to 3) have announced their retirements from the House of Representatives (those Democrats are younger on average than the Republicans), and nearly three times as many Republicans as Democrats (11 to 4) have said they will give up safe House seats to run for governor or senator?Traditionally the party not in control of the White House gains House seats in off-year elections.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | September 12, 1994
Washington -- Leaders of the Republican minority in the House of Representatives are secretly drawing up plans to change the rules of that distinguished body.They would like to eliminate a few committees, particularly the Energy and Commerce Committee -- now chaired by Rep. John Dingell of Michigan -- which for some reason has to pass on 40 percent of all legislation before the House. More important, at least to members, is the distribution of staff among the two parties. Under the rules written by Democrats, who have controlled the body for more than 40 years, the majority gets three staffers for every one allotted to the minority.
NEWS
By THOMAS F. SCHALLER | November 18, 2008
Just four years ago, a flood of books and essays hit newsstands and shelves, all diagnosing what went wrong with the Democratic Party and how to fix it. A cottage industry emerged, of which my own book was a small part. What a difference a few years makes. After the 2006 midterm and 2008 presidential election cycles, a new set of analyses is emergent, asking the same question but of the other major party: What's wrong with the Republicans? In those back-to-back cycles, the Republicans have lost not only the White House but also a dozen U.S. senators and more than 50 House seats, seven net governorships and hundreds of state legislative seats.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | November 2, 1998
SOME pundits are saying that voters are likely to succumb to the so-called six-year itch for tomorrow's midterm elections. That's the urge to scratch the president's party in congressional elections in the sixth year of his administration.So the Democrats could lose big. That is the historical flow. No doubt about it. But I think you can make too much of it. I think those who subscribe to the six-year itch theory have a point, but they overlook or ignore something, which leads to exaggeration.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2011
Both Democrats and Republicans in Howard County believe they have a chance to win a new seat in the House of Delegates proposed for the area around Ellicott City. The added seat comes as part of a state legislative redistricting map put forth this month by a panel appointed by Gov. Martin O'Malley, and would mirror Howard's most competitive County Council district — won in a tight race last year by Democrat Courtney Watson. "I think the map gives us some excellent opportunities," said Howard's Democratic Central Committee Chair, Michael C.A. McPherson.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2011
Former Prince George's County State's Attorney Glenn F. Ivey filed the paperwork Thursday required to challenge incumbent Rep. Donna F. Edwards, setting up what is likely to be one of Maryland's most competitive Democratic primaries next year. Ivey, 50, won countywide elections in Prince George's in 2002 and 2006 by wide margins. He will be a formidable challenger in the 4th District, which now includes a large swath of central Anne Arundel County. Ivey has been in private practice since leaving the state's attorney's office in January.
EXPLORE
October 31, 2011
The race for the 4th District seat held by U.S. Rep. Donna F. Edwards has grown increasingly crowded in recent days, as two possible Democratic candidates have said they are considering challenging the Prince George's Democrat in the primary. A spokesman for former Prince George's County State's Attorney Glenn Ivey said he is eyeing a run, and last week, Anne Arundel County Council member Jamie Benoit, whose district includes Laurel, announced he had formed an exploratory committee for a possible run in District 4. In Gov. Martin O'Malley's redistricting plans approved by the Maryland General Assembly this month, District 4 was reconfigured, moving nearly all of Laurel out of Rep. Steny Hoyer's District 5 and into District 4. Large swaths of Anne Arundel County were also added to District 4, which also includes parts of Prince George's County outside Laurel.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
Buoyed by a growing Hispanic population and the availability of steady federal jobs, Maryland grew by 9 percent in the last decade - faster than most Eastern states, according to new Census Bureau data. Maryland's population grew by 480,000 residents, to 5,773,552, according to data released Tuesday. With a growth rate slightly lower than the national average, Maryland maintained its ranking as the nation's 19th-most-populous state - and retained its seats in the House of Representatives.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2010
A 22-year old Baltimore man is facing theft charges after being found with a city police cell phone that had been stolen at the same time as a departmental handgun and ammunition from a police lieutenant's locked private vehicle. Police used a GPS device to trace the phone, stolen July 4 from the truck of Lt. Brian Matulonis, who had parked on Monument Street. Also missing were Matulonis' Glock handgun and 10 rounds of ammunition in a magazine. Matulonis, a 23-year veteran, is also a Republican candidate for Maryland House of Delegates in District 12A, which covers southwestern Baltimore County and Elkridge in Howard County.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | January 1, 2010
Eight people are vying to become the next state lawmaker from Frederick County, according to the county's Republican Central Committee, which released the names on its Web site Wednesday after earlier declining to make them public. The vacancy was created several weeks ago when Del. Richard B. Weldon Jr. stepped down to become executive assistant to Frederick Mayor Randy McClement. Weldon was a Republican until September 2008, when he left the party to become an independent. But because Weldon was elected as a Republican, the local party committee selects his replacement, who would have to run for election this fall.
NEWS
May 10, 2004
VOTERS ARE PLAYING an increasingly minor role in choosing their congressional representatives. Political manipulation of congressional district lines has become so brazen and so sophisticated, the outcome of contests between Democrats and Republicans is all but predetermined for the vast majority of the 435 House seats. Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy recently observed that state legislators who draw these lines are "in the business of rigging elections." Yet the high court effectively threw up its hands last month, declining to intrude in legislative mapmaking when the lines are gerrymandered for partisan advantage -- saying it had no standards to determine how much was too much.
NEWS
October 25, 1992
If the polls are right, the election of a Democrat, Bill Clinton, will end the partisan standoff that has paralyzed Washington for years. Even the most optimistic Republicans now concede that Democrats will retain control of both the House of Representatives and the Senate in next month's election.But exactly what the next two years in Washington will be like depends heavily on precisely who wins in the election this fall of 435 House members and 36 senators.Will Democrats keep enough seats to maintain a moderate-to-liberal working majority in the House?
NEWS
By THOMAS F. SCHALLER | November 18, 2008
Just four years ago, a flood of books and essays hit newsstands and shelves, all diagnosing what went wrong with the Democratic Party and how to fix it. A cottage industry emerged, of which my own book was a small part. What a difference a few years makes. After the 2006 midterm and 2008 presidential election cycles, a new set of analyses is emergent, asking the same question but of the other major party: What's wrong with the Republicans? In those back-to-back cycles, the Republicans have lost not only the White House but also a dozen U.S. senators and more than 50 House seats, seven net governorships and hundreds of state legislative seats.
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