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By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
WASHINGTON -- A video of Montgomery County Democratic Rep. Chris Van Hollen battling with House Republicans over legislation to reopen government agencies has gone viral -- picking up 1.7 million views in recent days -- as lawmakers continue to wrestle over a deal to end the weeks long budget impasse. The exchange between Van Hollen and Rep. Jason Chaffetz, a Utah Republican who was presiding over the chamber at the time, centers on an obscure rule change that prohibited Democrats from bringing a "clean," policy-free bill to the House floor to end the government shutdown.
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NEWS
October 28, 2013
The beach house "rules" for the Landon School graduates forbade the boys from driving from the South Bethany rental house, having girls behind closed bedroom doors or drinking "hard alcohol" ("Gansler says breaking up teen party was not his job," Oct. 24). Perhaps Mr. Gansler doesn't know the meaning of the word "hypocrite. " I hope he does know the meaning of "resign. " Ronald J. Leach, Baltimore
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2012
A few days before Mother's Day, 20-year-old Jessica Lynn Lee got into an argument with her mother about caring for Lee's baby and took off. It was a familiar, if infrequent, scene between them. They would fight over small stuff - using the computer, following house rules - and Lee would leave. She always came home to Brooklyn Park a few days later, though, sometimes spending the night in the woods near her house or with whomever she met along the way, while her mother cared for infant Maygan.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
WASHINGTON -- A video of Montgomery County Democratic Rep. Chris Van Hollen battling with House Republicans over legislation to reopen government agencies has gone viral -- picking up 1.7 million views in recent days -- as lawmakers continue to wrestle over a deal to end the weeks long budget impasse. The exchange between Van Hollen and Rep. Jason Chaffetz, a Utah Republican who was presiding over the chamber at the time, centers on an obscure rule change that prohibited Democrats from bringing a "clean," policy-free bill to the House floor to end the government shutdown.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr | November 28, 1991
Representative Tom McMillen, D-Md.-4th, claimed yesterday that a letter from the House ethics committee cleared him of any impropriety in trying to help a failing thrift last year by interceding with a top banking regulator in Atlanta."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 4, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Even as the Senate agonizes over alleged campaign finance lapses in the "Keating Five" case, House Democrats are set to vote today on a proposal permitting unlimited contributions to special funds set up by members to fight redistricting plans next year.With the completion of the 1990 census, scores of congressional districts in several large states will be radically reshaped or abolished. Incumbents are particularly concerned about partisan line-drawing that could cost them their seats.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Supporters of a bill that would impose a seven-day waiting period for handgun purchases were dealt a setback yesterday when the House Rules Committee said a competing measure, backed by the National Rifle Association, could be taken up by the House of Representatives today.The alternative, sponsored by Representative Harley O. Staggers Jr., D-W.Va., would require a check for criminal backgrounds on handgun buyers at the time of purchase.In its key decision on sending the two bills to the House floor, the 13-member House Rules Committee voted to follow standard rules during floor debate.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | February 9, 2012
The first partisan throw-down of the session played out this morning in the House of Delegates, a chamber that will likely control the fate of the big bills including gambling, taxes and same-sex marriage. This morning's topic was a little more arcane: A wording change in the House rules that clarifies when the Speaker can shut down debate. Now House Speaker Michael E. Busch can shut off discussion that is deemed "dilatory or frivolous. " Republican lawmakers, who are outnumbered by more than 2 to 1 in the chamber, took the floor to argue that new rule isn't necessary.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 5, 2005
WASHINGTON - As the House ethics committee moved yesterday toward an expected investigation of Majority Leader Tom DeLay, Democrats proposed tougher rules governing congressional travel and lobbying. The Democratic proposal was inspired by the controversy over the funding of trips taken by DeLay, a Texas Republican who said yesterday that he expects to be a target of an investigation and that his attorneys are preparing a response. But Republicans sought to shift the spotlight from DeLay by pointing to questions surrounding the funding of trips by some Democrats.
NEWS
April 20, 1992
They still don't get it. House Speaker Thomas S. Foley continues to play childish word games about the technical definition of check bouncing. House Minority Whip Newt Gingrich continues to brag about the partisan damage to the Democrats he helped orchestrate while sluffing off as simple "errors" his $26,000 in overdrafts in the House bank. Other House members rush to the microphones to proclaim that no laws were broken. Marylanders, at least, were spared that sorry spectacle. Its delegation was relatively free of the taint.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2012
A few days before Mother's Day, 20-year-old Jessica Lynn Lee got into an argument with her mother about caring for Lee's baby and took off. It was a familiar, if infrequent, scene between them. They would fight over small stuff - using the computer, following house rules - and Lee would leave. She always came home to Brooklyn Park a few days later, though, sometimes spending the night in the woods near her house or with whomever she met along the way, while her mother cared for infant Maygan.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | February 9, 2012
The first partisan throw-down of the session played out this morning in the House of Delegates, a chamber that will likely control the fate of the big bills including gambling, taxes and same-sex marriage. This morning's topic was a little more arcane: A wording change in the House rules that clarifies when the Speaker can shut down debate. Now House Speaker Michael E. Busch can shut off discussion that is deemed "dilatory or frivolous. " Republican lawmakers, who are outnumbered by more than 2 to 1 in the chamber, took the floor to argue that new rule isn't necessary.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2010
A potent Republican punch knocked Democrats from power in the House but largely spared Maryland incumbents in Tuesday's midterm voting. As part of that national trend, Maryland's most closely watched House contest saw Republican state Sen. Andy Harris defeat incumbent Democratic Rep. Frank Kratovil in the 1st District. Nearly complete returns showed Harris doing considerably better on the Eastern Shore than in 2008, when he lost in the historically Republican district by less than 3,000 votes.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2010
An early Friday morning fire in Glen Burnie displacing two people was ruled an arson, an Anne Arundel County Fire Department spokesman said. No one was injured when the two-story townhome caught fire in the 300 block for Valiant Circle, said Lt. Kevin Hamilton, spokesman with the department. The fire was considered "suspicious in nature," and it is believed that someone caused it, he said. About 20 firefighters were called at 1:43 a.m. Friday and was extinguished within about 20 minutes, he said.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE | April 7, 2009
On Monday, the Baltimore County Council unanimously enacted stronger zoning regulations governing rooming and boarding houses in an effort to deter irresponsible landlords from crowding rental homes with tenants. The law, which takes effect in 45 days, eliminates a loophole that allowed absentee landlords to circumvent zoning and create limited-liability corporations that gave tenants a small share of ownership. Rules limiting the number of unrelated tenants in a house to two do not apply to owners.
NEWS
By Jill Zuckman and Jill Zuckman,Chicago Tribune | January 6, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In one of its first official acts under Democratic control, the House voted 280-152 yesterday to curb the middle-of-the-night, backroom deal-making that resulted in approval of embarrassing - and sometimes illegal - pork barrel projects. Forty-eight Republicans joined 232 Democrats to require committees to disclose all sponsors of so-called earmarks. The new rules would prohibit lawmakers from trading their votes for spending projects tacked on to legislation, and it would require members to certify that they have no personal financial stake in their requests.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 11, 1998
There has been a sea change in the past 36 hours in the look and tone of television coverage of Kenneth W. Starr's investigation of President Clinton. The cameras have moved from the White House to Congress, and the administration is desperately trying to bring them back under its control.The dominant images framing the story have shifted from sex, politics and the White House to statesmanship, the committee room and Capitol Hill. Gone were the images of Monica Lewinsky and reporters standing outside the White House -- scenes that have been playing in a nonstop loop for months.
NEWS
By Noam N. Levey and Noam N. Levey,Los Angeles Times | December 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In a coda to a year of political disasters for Republicans, the House ethics committee declared yesterday that GOP lawmakers and staff members for years remained "willfully ignorant" that former Rep. Mark Foley was making sexual advances toward male congressional pages. Instead, driven by political considerations and fear of exposing Foley's homosexuality, they failed in their duty to protect the teenagers, the committee concluded. And, the panel said, congressional officials ignored evidence of predatory behavior by the Florida Republican that began emerging more than 10 years ago. Despite these criticisms, the bipartisan ethics panel found that no House rules were broken in the handling of the Foley case.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 5, 2005
WASHINGTON - As the House ethics committee moved yesterday toward an expected investigation of Majority Leader Tom DeLay, Democrats proposed tougher rules governing congressional travel and lobbying. The Democratic proposal was inspired by the controversy over the funding of trips taken by DeLay, a Texas Republican who said yesterday that he expects to be a target of an investigation and that his attorneys are preparing a response. But Republicans sought to shift the spotlight from DeLay by pointing to questions surrounding the funding of trips by some Democrats.
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