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NEWS
September 10, 2006
Today, The Sun concludes its endorsements for the Sept. 12 primary election with races for the U.S. Congress. First District: Three Democrats are competing for the chance to face eight-term Republican Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest in this district that embraces the Eastern Shore. The standout is Jim Corwin, a family doctor and political newcomer promoting themes common to this year's campaign: health care financing reform, a space-race type of commitment to energy independence, and a more aggressive regional approach to cleaning up the bay. Mr. Corwin gets The Sun's endorsement.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2012
Robert Shipley Auerbach, one of the founding members of the Maryland Green Party and the party's three-time nominee for the U.S. House of Representatives, died Dec. 12 from injuries suffered in a hit-and-run accident that evening in Greenbelt. He was 92. Born in New York City in 1919, Mr. Auerbach became involved in politics, particularly election reform, in the 1930s. He was active in such groups as the Congress of Racial Equality and the War Resisters League. Mr. Auerbach moved to Greenbelt, where he ran for City Council, more than 50 years ago. A founder of the Green Party's Maryland affiliate, he was nominated for the state's 5th District seat, for the third time, this year.
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NEWS
August 16, 2006
Date of birth: Aug. 16, 1971 Party affiliation: Democrat More online For coverage of the November elections and archived stories on the General Assembly, go to baltimoresun.com/politics
NEWS
April 24, 2012
Deficit reduction is an important national priority, vital to our long-term economic opportunity and security. But just because it's important doesn't mean that it can be undertaken without regard to our national values. Unfortunately, the House of Representatives left values on the sideline this week when it moved forward with a shocking proposal to cut food assistance for our nation's hungry by over $33 billion. That it was done in the name of deficit reduction does not excuse the fact that cuts to anti-hunger programs at a time when need has never been greater are both reckless and short-sighted.
NEWS
By Peter Kumpa and Peter Kumpa,Evening Sun Staff | September 12, 1990
Maryland's eight incumbent members of the House of Representatives, six Democrats and two Republicans, easily won their party's primaries yesterday with only Rep. Roy Dyson, the 1st District Democrat, overcoming a major threat.Aside from Dyson, the remaining seven congressional veterans won renomination by wide margins despite low turnouts throughout the state. None of the seven faced well-known or well-financed challenges in the November general election.In the 5th District Democratic primary, Abdul Alim Muhammad, a year-old surgeon and spokesman for the Nation of Islam, faced Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, attracting national attention.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1996
WASHINGTON -- During his first afternoon as a congressman, Elijah E. Cummings reflexively got up from his desk and began to walk across his new Capitol Hill office to get a soda. His legislative director politely stopped him and then returned from a closet with a Diet Pepsi.It was one of many small signs yesterday that Mr. Cummings' life had fundamentally changed. That morning, he had stood in the well of the House of Representatives as Speaker Newt Gingrich swore him in as Maryland's 7th District congressman before a cheering crowd of friends, family and fellow state politicians.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2001
Last November, New Hampshire voters elected Tom Alciere, a Libertarian-turned-Republican from Nashua who applauds the killing of police officers, to the state House of Representatives. One of Alciere's fellow legislators rebuked him at a news conference last week. "Massachusetts is making fun of our state right now, and I don't appreciate it," said Rep. Greg Salts of Manchester, referring to New Hampshire's greatest rival. "You're a disgrace." Alciere is being shunned by other colleagues, but his election has illuminated the dark side of New Hampshire's 400-member House of Representatives: A person can ascend from candidate to lawmaker without undergoing public scrutiny.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 10, 1991
As Bridgeport goes, so goes the nation.Gorby wants to be in London and not Moscow in June. He may know something.Bid no farewells to Eli Jacobs. He didn't leave.Imagine. The House of Representatives found the fat in the budget, and it wasn't the $30 billion space station.
NEWS
April 9, 1991
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun on relations among black, Hispanic and Asian-Americans should have stated that there are two Californians of Asian descent in the House of Representatives. They are Robert T. Matsui and Norman Y. Mineta, Democrats, both of Japanese descent.The Sun regrets the errors.
FEATURES
February 9, 2006
Feb. 9 1825: The House of Representatives elected John Quincy Adams president after no candidate received a majority of electoral votes. 1870: The U.S. Weather Bureau was established. 1964: The Beatles made their first live American television appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show on CBS.
NEWS
August 5, 2011
In her book, "Ratification, The People Debate the Constitution, 1787-1788," Pauline Maier notes that during the debate for ratification of the United States constitution in Massachusetts (as reported in the American Herald during the convention), the good people of Massachusetts elected "perhaps one of the compleatest representations of interests and sentiments of their constituents that ever were assembled. " One heated debate arose over the two-year term length for representatives, some feeling it was too long for them to be in office "without going back to the people for reelection.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2011
Maura Gillespie turns the corner beside her desk and unlocks a door to the balcony. Laid out below her, perfectly symmetrical, is the National Mall, with the Washington Monument rising like an exclamation point at the end of the expanse. "People say it's the best view in D.C.," says the 22-year-old, who graduated last month from Loyola University Maryland. Strictly speaking, the balcony does not belong to Gillespie. It goes with the office occupied by her boss, John Boehner, speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and the highest-ranking Republican in the country.
NEWS
April 5, 2011
Paul Ryan, the Republican representative from Wisconsin who heads the House budget committee, deserves tremendous credit for the deficit reduction proposal he unveiled today. While his colleagues are squabbling about a few billion in symbolic cuts to the current year's federal budget — and threatening a government shutdown in the process — he has taken the politically risky but necessary step of advancing a proposal for the next fiscal year and beyond that would tackle the real sources of our federal budget problems: Medicare and Medicaid, corporate tax loopholes, excessive defense spending, agriculture subsidies and more.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2010
Joseph Edward Bullock, a former member of the Maryland House of Delegates and a retired Baltimore Public Works official, died of a stroke July 27 at FutureCare Cherrywood in Reisterstown. He was 86 and lived in Pikesville. Born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown, he attended St. Elizabeth of Hungary Parochial School and was a 1941 Patterson Park High School graduate. He served in the Navy as an engineer in the Pacific during World War II. Family members said he helped construct air bases.
NEWS
October 4, 2007
The Democrats who control Congress have been hiding behind their inability to get bills that might affect the war in Iraq through the Senate. See how we try, they say, but the shadow of filibuster and veto keeps us from doing anything. Not anymore. President Bush has asked Congress for $190 billion in supplemental funds to keep paying for Iraq and Afghanistan; the Democrats in the House of Representatives can do with that request as they see fit. Unfortunately, it looks like politics will get in the way of what's right.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTERS | June 9, 2007
Gilbert Gude, a liberal Republican who championed environmental causes during five terms in the House of Representatives, died Thursday of heart failure at Sibley Hospital in Washington. The longtime Bethesda resident was 84. Mr. Gude, who represented Montgomery County and, at times, parts of Howard County from 1967 to 1977, was the chief House sponsor of the bill preserving the C&O Canal from Georgetown to Cumberland, making it the narrowest -- and one of the most-used -- national parks.
NEWS
April 23, 1995
Porter Hardy Jr., 91, a Virginia Democrat who served in the House of Representatives for 22 years, died Wednesday in Virginia Beach, Va.He was known for resisting the influence of powerful Virginia Sen. Harry Byrd Sr. while representing the state's 2nd District from 1947 to 1969.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Staff | February 11, 2007
Washington -- For the first 15 minutes of his shift behind the president's desk, Benjamin L. Cardin has the Senate chamber pretty much to himself. He chats with aides, reads papers spread out on the desk in front of him, waits for a senator to speak. Finally, Sen. Jon Kyl, an Arizona Republican, gets to his feet and holds forth on a proposal to raise the minimum wage. The chamber remains mostly empty. Presiding over the Senate is a chore usually meted out to senators with the least seniority.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis Sun reporter | November 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Democratic takeover of the House of Representatives will elevate some Marylanders to more influential posts and could give Rep. Steny H. Hoyer a chance to become the No. 2 House leader.]-- But first Hoyer must overcome a challenge from a close ally of Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California, a Baltimore native who is all but certain to become the first woman speaker. Hoyer, first elected to Congress more than 25 years ago, is vying with Rep. John P. Murtha, a Pelosi loyalist from Pennsylvania, for the job of majority leader.
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