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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 24, 1997
LONDON -- John Roundell Palmer Selborne was born to rule.He is a member of Britain's House of Lords, a hereditary peer bearing a title handed down generations to the eldest male heir.Lord Selborne can vote on important government legislation. He can add his voice to the genteel debate that takes place within the plush upper chamber of Britain's Houses of Parliament.But Lord Selborne's days as an unelected political player may be numbered. Britain's new Labor government is out to strip the hereditary peers of the right to sit and vote in the House of Lords.
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NEWS
March 8, 2007
WORLD Mourning attack victims in Iraq Marching under blood-spattered banners, mourners carried coffins through streets still littered with pieces of flesh and debris, as the death toll from three consecutive days of attacks on Shiite Muslim pilgrims in Iraq climbed to 188. pg 11a Elected House of Lords backed The House of Commons in Britain took a historic step yesterday to endorse a fully elected House of Lords, a move that could eventually end...
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 25, 1998
LONDON -- A robed, bejeweled and bespectacled Queen Elizabeth II dispassionately read out one of the more revolutionary governmental policies of her near half-century reign yesterday.With one simple sentence, she confirmed the Labor government's commitment to sweep away centuries of tradition and radically alter the makeup of the House of Lords, the upper chamber of Parliament."A bill will be introduced to remove the rights of hereditary peers to sit and vote in the House of Lords," the queen said.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 8, 2007
LONDON -- Britain's House of Commons took a historic step yesterday to endorse a fully elected House of Lords, a move that could eventually end the status of Parliament's upper house as a seat of privilege and patronage. After most of a century spent debating a more democratic foundation for a house rooted in Britain's aristocratic and baronial past, Parliament members voted 337-224 to endorse the idea of a fully elected upper chamber. By an even greater margin, they voted to abolish the 91 seats reserved for lords who inherited their titles.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 20, 1998
LONDON -- Britain's House of Lords, the upper chamber of Parliament, often resembles the world's most exclusive retirement community. But lately their lordships have been acting so robust it may kill them.Between catnaps and supper breaks, the graying politicians, religious leaders and aristocrats showed they can be as defiant as a bunch of teen-agers.They grudgingly voted Monday to let the country's top judge, the Lord Chancellor, shed his 17th-century ceremonial garb, enabling him to put away traditional tights and buckled slippers and dress in trousers, socks and shoes.
NEWS
November 7, 1999
LONG AGO the United Kingdom stripped the House of Lords of authority and power.A half-century ago, Labor politicians created life peers, who could sit and debate without actually leaving honors or privileges to their posterity.Now the New Labor government of Tony Blair, worries at the appearance of non-existent inherited power. And so the hereditary right to sit in the House of Lords is being erased.In the first stage, now enacted, only 92 of the 751 hereditary lords may sit. They must be elected by their (ahem!
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 8, 2007
LONDON -- Britain's House of Commons took a historic step yesterday to endorse a fully elected House of Lords, a move that could eventually end the status of Parliament's upper house as a seat of privilege and patronage. After most of a century spent debating a more democratic foundation for a house rooted in Britain's aristocratic and baronial past, Parliament members voted 337-224 to endorse the idea of a fully elected upper chamber. By an even greater margin, they voted to abolish the 91 seats reserved for lords who inherited their titles.
NEWS
November 3, 1999
Here is an edited excerpt of an editorial from the Los Angeles Times, which was published Friday.A ROYAL commission has been touring Britain for several months now, measuring the public's appetite for parliamentary reform and particularly the right of titled heirs to automatically inherit a seat in the House of Lords. The commission's conclusions were not announced, but the message was made clear by the result.Recently, the Lords accepted a compromise plan that would allow only 92 of the almost 750 hereditary peers to remain in the House of Lords.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | October 9, 1991
LONDON -- Will there be a Countess of Finchley to swell the ranks of Britain's aristocracy? And an Earl of Finchley, her son, to carry on when she is gone?Margaret Thatcher tried yesterday to put an end to speculation seething here on the reach and grasp of her ambitions. In a letter to the Times she wrote, "I wish to make it clear that I have not sought and do not seek a hereditary peerage."Well, that ends that. Or does it?The Guardian, the British newspaper that pretends to speak for those strata of society supposedly antithetical to kings, queens, earls, countesses and all that ilk, wasn't satisfied.
NEWS
February 29, 1996
The 10th Duke of Atholl, 64, one of Scotland's richest landowners and the head of the only private army in Britain, died of a stroke Tuesday in London. Born George Iain Murray, he succeeded to the title in 1957. He had served as president of the Scottish Landowners Federation, president of the National Trust for Scotland, chairman of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution and captain of the House of Lords bridge team.Bernice McMurry Scott, 91, mother of Coretta Scott King and mother-in-law of Martin Luther King Jr., died Monday in Atlanta.
NEWS
November 7, 1999
LONG AGO the United Kingdom stripped the House of Lords of authority and power.A half-century ago, Labor politicians created life peers, who could sit and debate without actually leaving honors or privileges to their posterity.Now the New Labor government of Tony Blair, worries at the appearance of non-existent inherited power. And so the hereditary right to sit in the House of Lords is being erased.In the first stage, now enacted, only 92 of the 751 hereditary lords may sit. They must be elected by their (ahem!
NEWS
November 3, 1999
Here is an edited excerpt of an editorial from the Los Angeles Times, which was published Friday.A ROYAL commission has been touring Britain for several months now, measuring the public's appetite for parliamentary reform and particularly the right of titled heirs to automatically inherit a seat in the House of Lords. The commission's conclusions were not announced, but the message was made clear by the result.Recently, the Lords accepted a compromise plan that would allow only 92 of the almost 750 hereditary peers to remain in the House of Lords.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 30, 1999
LONDON -- Life has been swell inside the House of Lords.There is no pay but plenty of privilege. The dining rooms are divine, the bars are plush and the hours aren't bad, either.But at the approach of the millennium, the centuries-old debating chamber is in the midst of another historic upheaval. Hundreds of aging hereditary peers, whose ancestors include some who had their titles before Columbus discovered America, are about to lose their say.Some lords are incensed by the changes. Others resigned.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 26, 1998
LONDON -- Chilean Gen. Augusto Pinochet suffered a stunning legal setback yesterday as Britain's House of Lords ruled that the former dictator was not immune from arrest for alleged human rights crimes committed during his 17-year rule.In a dramatic 3-2 decision that brought gasps from the visitors gallery, the senior panel of judges known as the Law Lords overturned a lower court ruling that Pinochet was immune from prosecution because he was as a former head of state.The verdict opens the way for British courts to consider Spain's request to extradite Pinochet to face charges of genocide, terrorism and torture.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 25, 1998
LONDON -- A robed, bejeweled and bespectacled Queen Elizabeth II dispassionately read out one of the more revolutionary governmental policies of her near half-century reign yesterday.With one simple sentence, she confirmed the Labor government's commitment to sweep away centuries of tradition and radically alter the makeup of the House of Lords, the upper chamber of Parliament."A bill will be introduced to remove the rights of hereditary peers to sit and vote in the House of Lords," the queen said.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 20, 1998
LONDON -- Britain's House of Lords, the upper chamber of Parliament, often resembles the world's most exclusive retirement community. But lately their lordships have been acting so robust it may kill them.Between catnaps and supper breaks, the graying politicians, religious leaders and aristocrats showed they can be as defiant as a bunch of teen-agers.They grudgingly voted Monday to let the country's top judge, the Lord Chancellor, shed his 17th-century ceremonial garb, enabling him to put away traditional tights and buckled slippers and dress in trousers, socks and shoes.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | October 24, 1991
LONDON -- In England, at last, a wife has the legal right to say no.The House of Lords gave her that right yesterday by finally repudiating a 255-year-old judicial principle that stated a man could not be guilty of raping his wife.The announcement of the final vote by the five law lords triggered an outburst of cheers and celebration among women who had gathered in the public gallery of the House of Lords to await the decision."The law lords have finally nailed a legal lie which has somehow survived for nearly three centuries," said Claire Glasman of Women Against Rape.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 30, 1999
LONDON -- Life has been swell inside the House of Lords.There is no pay but plenty of privilege. The dining rooms are divine, the bars are plush and the hours aren't bad, either.But at the approach of the millennium, the centuries-old debating chamber is in the midst of another historic upheaval. Hundreds of aging hereditary peers, whose ancestors include some who had their titles before Columbus discovered America, are about to lose their say.Some lords are incensed by the changes. Others resigned.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 24, 1997
LONDON -- John Roundell Palmer Selborne was born to rule.He is a member of Britain's House of Lords, a hereditary peer bearing a title handed down generations to the eldest male heir.Lord Selborne can vote on important government legislation. He can add his voice to the genteel debate that takes place within the plush upper chamber of Britain's Houses of Parliament.But Lord Selborne's days as an unelected political player may be numbered. Britain's new Labor government is out to strip the hereditary peers of the right to sit and vote in the House of Lords.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 8, 1997
LONDON -- Enough already with the tights and the wig.That was the message delivered yesterday by the Lord Chancellor, who is desperate to ditch his 17th-century costume for a modern judicial gown.In an interview with the Times of London, Lord Irvine of Lairg bemoaned dressing in a full-bottomed wig, breeches, tights, embroidered gown and buckled shoes.The Speaker of the House of Lords and top legal officer of England and Wales accepts the need for such pomp during formal occasions, but he loathes the "ludicrous silk tights which I have to wear every day, despite having got the business of pulling them on down to a fine art."
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