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By Patrick A. McGuire | July 5, 1992
One day last summer at the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup, a prisoner named Dennis Wise took a seat at the back of the tiny cubicle where I hold forth each week as a volunteer writing instructor. It's a loosely structured class and it isn't unusual that prisoners wander in for a session or two and then drift away. While always a possibility that such drifting is a commentary on the quality of the instruction, it is also true that writing is a painful business. The core of regulars who turn out every week come not because they want to, or because someone else wants them to, but because, in the true writer's motivation, they simply have to. Buried inside is something terrible, something wonderful, something that absolutely must come out. All their lives they have tried either to unlock long-imprisoned feelings or to escape them; that they have failed is as evident as their bleak existence in this ancient, decaying prison, far removed from the commerce of the normal world.
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By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | July 1, 2008
A convicted murderer sentenced to an added 15-year term for assaulting a fellow inmate told an Anne Arundel County judge yesterday that he is being threatened in prison by gang members and was forced to resort to violence to protect himself. Richard Janey, 43, is serving a 30-year sentence at the Western Correctional Institution in Cumberland for the murder of an Annapolis woman in 1994. Janey was convicted of second-degree murder in the killing of 29-year-old Susan McAteer, who was stabbed 58 times.
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NEWS
October 8, 2000
An inmate serving a life term for murder was found dead in his cell at the House of Correction in Jessup yesterday morning - possibly from strangulation, authorities said. The Maryland Division of Correction was investigating the death of Alan Newman, imprisoned since 1993 for murder and weapons convictions. His age was not available last night. According to state prisons spokesman David Towers, officers making rounds observed Newman unconscious in the cell he shared with another prisoner.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 11, 2008
Brenda Barney hadn't been in a classroom for over 20 years - closer to 30, actually - when she decided to take a math course at Coppin State University. She flunked it. So she enrolled at Baltimore City Community College to make up the course. She took English 101 too, and that's when Lynn Kerr noticed something about Barney. "I saw the spark in her," Kerr said. It's a spark that Kerr, who's taught English at BCCC since 1991, tries to fan into a blaze for learning whenever she sees it. Kerr became more than Barney's English professor: She became a mentor who encouraged her to get a degree from BCCC and to attend the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1999
The union representing employees at the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup is backing efforts by state officials to investigate corrections officers suspected of smuggling drugs into the prison."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 23, 2003
A 26-year-old inmate at the Maryland House of Correction was flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center late Tuesday after a stabbing in a fight that injured his chest and neck, prison officials said. The fight at 8:45 p.m. in a prison dormitory caused a partial lockdown of the maximum-security prison, said Capt. Priscilla Doggett, a spokeswoman for the Division of Correction. The man, whose name was not released pending notification of family, is serving a 14-year sentence, Doggett said.
NEWS
July 10, 1992
One inmate was stabbed to death and another seriously wounded today when a fight broke out among four prisoners returning from the recreational yard at the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup.Leonard Sipes, a spokesman for the Division of Corrections, said the wounded inmate was in serious condition at the Maryland Shock-Trauma Center in Baltimore.The names of the inmates were withheld pending notification of next-of-kin. convictionsMr. Sipes said the fight broke out about 9:30 a.m. as inmates were returning to their cells.
NEWS
December 24, 2007
Charles Preslipsky, who helped run a family-owned day care center in Odenton for 50 years, died of heart failure Dec. 15 at Baltimore Washington Medical Center in Glen Burnie. The Odenton resident was 87. Born in Sarver, Pa., Mr. Preslipsky graduated from Tarentum High School in 1939. After graduation, he worked for two years in the Sun coal mines in western Pennsylvania outside Pittsburgh -- the same mines that his father and older brother had worked. With his brother, he joined the Army in 1943 and served as an X-ray technician during World War II at the hospital at Fort Meade.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
About half the striking inmates at the Maryland House of Correction left their cells for breakfast yesterday morning - a sign that the protest of a new smoking ban and other prison conditions might be nearing an end, prison officials said. Inmates at the maximum-security lockup in Jessup have refused to leave their cells and go to jobs at prison factories since Monday - a work stoppage that authorities estimate has cost the state $50,000 a day in lost production. But signs that tensions were easing in the fourth day of the strike were visible yesterday, officials said.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | February 1, 2007
A 20-year prisoner who disemboweled a fellow inmate in gang warfare but maintained he acted in self-defense was sentenced yesterday to life in prison without the possibility of parole by an Anne Arundel County judge. Kenneth Lawrence Higgins, 37, described by prosecutors as a "five-star general" in the Bloods gang, asked Circuit Judge Paul A. Hackner for a suspended sentence so he could run prison programs. Higgins, who was serving 35 years for rape and related crimes at the Maryland House of Correction Annex in Jessup, was convicted last month of the January 2005 fatal stabbing of Brian Wilson, 21. He was serving four years and a day for drug dealing and assault.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Sun reporter | February 26, 2008
An inmate accused in the fatal stabbing of a correctional officer in 2006 tried to escape yesterday evening while being examined at Mercy Medical Center, less than a mile from the Super Max prison where he was being held, a spokesman for the state's Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services said. Rick Binetti, the spokesman, said Lamarr C. Harris, 37, was being examined for an undetermined illness or injury about 6 p.m. at Mercy Medical Center on North Calvert Street when Harris tried to flee by "taking a couple of steps" and was immediately restrained by four Super Max officers and at least two hospital security personnel.
NEWS
December 24, 2007
Charles Preslipsky, who helped run a family-owned day care center in Odenton for 50 years, died of heart failure Dec. 15 at Baltimore Washington Medical Center in Glen Burnie. The Odenton resident was 87. Born in Sarver, Pa., Mr. Preslipsky graduated from Tarentum High School in 1939. After graduation, he worked for two years in the Sun coal mines in western Pennsylvania outside Pittsburgh -- the same mines that his father and older brother had worked. With his brother, he joined the Army in 1943 and served as an X-ray technician during World War II at the hospital at Fort Meade.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,Sun reporter | December 13, 2007
The fatal stabbing of correctional officer David W. McGuinn at the Maryland House of Correction on July 25, 2006, marked what would turn out to be one of the last chapters in the bloody history of the antiquated Jessup prison. But nearly 18 months after the death of McGuinn -- and almost a year after the prison was closed -- questions have emerged about the mishandling of potentially key evidence and the impact it could have on the prosecution of the two inmates accused in his killing.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,Sun reporter | December 3, 2007
Cresaptown -- Amid the scenic mountains of Western Maryland looms a forbidding fortress of a prison designed with one goal in mind - keeping the state's most violent and disruptive criminals inside, and under complete control. North Branch Correctional Institution, a state-of-the-art maximum-security prison just south of Cumberland, has been opening in phases since 2003 and will double in size to hold up to 1,400 inmates when two more housing units open next year. The high-tech prison - which will cost $171 million when completed - is taking inmates from aging facilities such as the House of Correction in Jessup, which was shut down in March after months of relentless violence.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 10, 2007
Here's what has to be some bad news for the folks at Maryland's Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services: Priscilla Doggett is sticking to her guns. Last week, I wrote about all those questions still unanswered in the death of corrections Officer David McGuinn, who was fatally stabbed in July of 2006 at the Maryland House of Correction. The House of Correction has since been shut down and its staff and inmates dispersed throughout the system. The prison is gone, but allegations that McGuinn was on an inmate hit list, had been threatened and reassigned off the housing units and then put back in the housing units, remain.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,sun reporter | May 17, 2007
Less than a year after taking over as Maryland's prisons chief, John A. Rowley says he plans to step down to become warden of a maximum-security prison near Cumberland. Rowley said yesterday that he sought the change for "quality of life" reasons. Overseeing the state's 26 prisons and staff of 7,400, he said, was a time-consuming job that had became too disruptive to his family life. Public Safety Secretary Gary D. Maynard praised Rowley's performance and said he will remain the acting commissioner of correction until a suitable replacement can be found.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer Staff writer John Rivera contributed to this article | September 28, 1992
An inmate was stabbed and two correctional officers were assaulted in separate incidents Saturday night at the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup, a state Division of Correction official reported.Inmate Dwayne Frazier, 29, was stabbed in his back, arm and face by an unknown assailant with a homemade shank about 6:10 p.m., said Cpl. J. Scott McCauley, a correction spokesman.Frazier was taken to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center after the incident. Yesterday he was transferred to the Maryland House of Correction hospital, where he was reported in good condition, Corporal McCauley said.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2001
In the second day of an inmate strike at the Maryland House of Correction, tensions escalated yesterday as nearly all of the 1,228 prisoners refused to come out of their cells, virtually shutting down the maximum-security lockup in Jessup. Inmates are protesting the state's new smoking ban, which went into effect July 2, and long-standing conditions at the prison, including the lack of educational and training programs, authorities said. Division of Correction officials emerged from an hours-long meeting with inmates late yesterday afternoon with the hope "that the House of Correction will return to normal operations shortly," said DOC spokesman David B. Towers.
NEWS
May 16, 2007
A prisoner at the Maryland prison system's Jessup Pre-Release Unit was stabbed yesterday afternoon in an inmate-on-inmate assault, authorities said. The victim was flown by helicopter to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, said Maj. Priscilla Doggett, a spokeswoman for the Division of Correction. He was in stable condition last night, she said. The incident occurred about 3:20 p.m. on the outdoor basketball court of the minimum-security facility, where prisoners are held for as long as two years before they are released.
NEWS
March 23, 2007
Treat mentally ill before crisis strikes In the tragic case of Ryan Lee Meyers, public outrage is focused on the police ("A stunning omission," editorial, March 21). But cries for reform rarely turn to Maryland's real problem - an archaic state law that keeps some mentally ill people from getting help until they, like Mr. Meyers, become a danger to themselves or others. Maryland actually requires someone with a severe mental illness to be dangerous before he or she can be involuntarily committed.
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