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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 5, 2001
LONDON - British Prime Minister Tony Blair publicly disclosed details yesterday of evidence against Osama bin Laden and his al-Qaida terrorist network and said they had "planned and carried out" the Sept. 11 attacks in the United States. In a terse statement read before a hushed House of Commons called into emergency session, Blair outlined parts of the investigation and warned Afghanistan's Taliban regime to give up bin Laden and his organization or "become our enemy also." Blair said, "The attacks on 11 September bear all the hallmarks of a bin Laden operation: meticulous long-term planning; a desire to inflict mass casualties; a total disregard for innocent lives, including Muslims; multiple simultaneous attacks; and the use of suicide attackers."
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NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 20, 2004
LONDON - Protesters in the British House of Commons hurled condoms full of purple cornstarch at Prime Minister Tony Blair yesterday, injuring no one but prompting an urgent examination of security. Two men, ages 50 and 36, were arrested. An organization called Fathers 4 Justice, which advocates greater child custody rights for men, claimed responsibility. The attack followed security lapses at Windsor Castle and the Big Ben bell tower and was made weeks after Parliament received an intelligence alert that it might be attacked with anthrax or ricin.
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NEWS
June 15, 1997
IN THIS COUNTRY, where a respectable Potomac businesswoman keeps an assault rifle in the bedroom, the British House of Commons can only be considered un-American. It outlawed handguns outright, with hardly the blink of an eye.A country with no written constitution obviously has no Second Amendment that can be quoted in part so as to misconstrue its meaning. Bummer.Just because a madman walked into an elementary school in a Scottish village with four legally owned handguns and murdered 16 children and a teacher, a year ago, the newly elected British House of Commons acted as if it truly believed there was some connection.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 17, 2003
LONDON - The night's last subway car leaving Piccadilly Circus, the rollicking center of London's night life, is like a rolling drunk tank. The odor of beer, booze and cigarettes hangs in the air. If nobody has become sick, somebody is about to. Maybe a fight breaks out. And in contrast to daytime hours, when speaking in a subway car is about as welcome as whistling in church, uninhibited conversations are nearly loud enough to drown out the screech of...
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 13, 2000
LONDON - Betty Boothroyd, the first female speaker of Britain's House of Commons - and the first never to wear a wig - is calling it a career. In a surprise announcement yesterday, the 70-year-old speaker whose stern, throaty "Order! Order!" has become a familiar cry on both sides of the Atlantic, told Parliament she was leaving after the summer recess. It was something like a favorite schoolmarm telling her boys (and a few girls) that she would not be back for the beginning of school next year.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 12, 1996
LONDON -- Britain's nurses and school teachers have to take low pay raises, but not the members of the House of Commons.While nearly every other public worker makes do with a 3 percent increase, the politicians in Parliament's lower house voted themselves a 26 percent wage boost.At least they had the good political sense to wait until near midnight Wednesday before voting on the package."We're being portrayed as a bunch of Dickensian money-grabbers," Labor's Dale Campbell-Savours said.In their dash for cash, the pols turned their backs on a proposed 3 percent pay rise backed by Prime Minister John Major and Labor leader Tony Blair.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau | November 19, 1993
LONDON -- Queen Elizabeth II opened a new session of Parliament yesterday with pomp and pageantry and her required reading of the reigning government's "back to basics" legislative program.Enthroned in the House of Lords with Prince Philip bemedaled at her side, the queen, in her diamond-encrusted imperial crown, read a concise, condensed version of the proposed legislation in about 10 minutes. Her voice rang out firm and high and thin in the Gothic hall.Arrayed before her were the lords in scarlet and ermine, the judges of the realm bewigged and robed, the ambassadors to the Court of St. James's in morning coats and striped pants and, in the back, members of the House of Commons.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | February 26, 1991
LONDON -- British Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd yesterday called Iraqi President Saddam Hussein "a bogus, puffed-up frog of a man" and said it would be difficult to have postwar dealings with him.He echoed Secretary of State James A. Baker III's assessment: "It would be a heck of a lot easier if he wasn't there."But Mr. Hurd, in testimony to the House of Commons Foreign Affairs Committee, insisted that the allied war aims had not been widened to imposing a new government on Iraq.It was impossible, he said, to foresee who would be in control of Iraq once its forces were pushed out of Kuwait.
FEATURES
November 27, 2002
Nov. 27 1910: New York's Pennsylvania Station opened. 1942: During World War II, the French navy at Toulon scuttled its ships and submarines to keep them out of the hands of the Nazis. 1953: Playwright Eugene O'Neill died in Boston at age 65. 1973: The Senate voted 92-3 to confirm Gerald R. Ford as vice president, succeeding Spiro T. Agnew, who had resigned. 1978: San Francisco Mayor George Moscone and City Supervisor Harvey Milk, a gay-rights activist, were shot to death inside City Hall by former supervisor Dan White.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 20, 2004
LONDON - Protesters in the British House of Commons hurled condoms full of purple cornstarch at Prime Minister Tony Blair yesterday, injuring no one but prompting an urgent examination of security. Two men, ages 50 and 36, were arrested. An organization called Fathers 4 Justice, which advocates greater child custody rights for men, claimed responsibility. The attack followed security lapses at Windsor Castle and the Big Ben bell tower and was made weeks after Parliament received an intelligence alert that it might be attacked with anthrax or ricin.
FEATURES
November 27, 2002
Nov. 27 1910: New York's Pennsylvania Station opened. 1942: During World War II, the French navy at Toulon scuttled its ships and submarines to keep them out of the hands of the Nazis. 1953: Playwright Eugene O'Neill died in Boston at age 65. 1973: The Senate voted 92-3 to confirm Gerald R. Ford as vice president, succeeding Spiro T. Agnew, who had resigned. 1978: San Francisco Mayor George Moscone and City Supervisor Harvey Milk, a gay-rights activist, were shot to death inside City Hall by former supervisor Dan White.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 5, 2001
LONDON - British Prime Minister Tony Blair publicly disclosed details yesterday of evidence against Osama bin Laden and his al-Qaida terrorist network and said they had "planned and carried out" the Sept. 11 attacks in the United States. In a terse statement read before a hushed House of Commons called into emergency session, Blair outlined parts of the investigation and warned Afghanistan's Taliban regime to give up bin Laden and his organization or "become our enemy also." Blair said, "The attacks on 11 September bear all the hallmarks of a bin Laden operation: meticulous long-term planning; a desire to inflict mass casualties; a total disregard for innocent lives, including Muslims; multiple simultaneous attacks; and the use of suicide attackers."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 13, 2000
LONDON - Betty Boothroyd, the first female speaker of Britain's House of Commons - and the first never to wear a wig - is calling it a career. In a surprise announcement yesterday, the 70-year-old speaker whose stern, throaty "Order! Order!" has become a familiar cry on both sides of the Atlantic, told Parliament she was leaving after the summer recess. It was something like a favorite schoolmarm telling her boys (and a few girls) that she would not be back for the beginning of school next year.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 29, 1997
LONDON -- Frazzled and combative, jeering and cheering, Britain's House of Commons debated the age-old British blood sport of hunting with dogs yesterday.In the end, the Commons approved a bill, 411-151, to ban wild animals from being pursued, injured or killed by the use of dogs.That was good news for foxes and stags, the main prey of the hounds.But despite the overwhelming margin to snuff out the hunt, it's unlikely that the measure will become law soon.The reason? Britain's new Labor government doesn't want to offend rural landowners who derive some of their wealth -- and pleasure -- from the chase of the fox.Labor has not officially backed the bill, meaning the measure won't gain the needed floor time to clear remaining hurdles in the House of Commons and the upper chamber of Parliament, the House of Lords.
NEWS
June 15, 1997
IN THIS COUNTRY, where a respectable Potomac businesswoman keeps an assault rifle in the bedroom, the British House of Commons can only be considered un-American. It outlawed handguns outright, with hardly the blink of an eye.A country with no written constitution obviously has no Second Amendment that can be quoted in part so as to misconstrue its meaning. Bummer.Just because a madman walked into an elementary school in a Scottish village with four legally owned handguns and murdered 16 children and a teacher, a year ago, the newly elected British House of Commons acted as if it truly believed there was some connection.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 12, 1996
LONDON -- Britain's nurses and school teachers have to take low pay raises, but not the members of the House of Commons.While nearly every other public worker makes do with a 3 percent increase, the politicians in Parliament's lower house voted themselves a 26 percent wage boost.At least they had the good political sense to wait until near midnight Wednesday before voting on the package."We're being portrayed as a bunch of Dickensian money-grabbers," Labor's Dale Campbell-Savours said.In their dash for cash, the pols turned their backs on a proposed 3 percent pay rise backed by Prime Minister John Major and Labor leader Tony Blair.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 5, 1992
LONDON -- Neil Kinnock lost his temper in the House of Commons not too long ago and called a Conservative member of Parliament "a jerk."A blizzard of press criticism fell on him.It was a mistake. More in anger with himself than regret, he apologized.Mr. Kinnock is a politically impassioned man who has spent the last half-decade shedding his color and suppressing his passion. The Neil Kinnock of the early days was too rich for Britain's mainstream electorate.But sometimes the passion will come out. About three years ago, during a television interview on the subject of the Conservatives' handling of the economy, he burst forth: "Look, they are smashing up our country.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | January 26, 1993
LONDON -- The monarchy has again floated to the top of the agenda of serious issues in Britain; debates over its future rage in the press, in the House of Commons, even within the Church of England.Paddy Ashdown, the leader of the Liberal Democratic Party, on Sunday became the first major party leader to call for the monarchy's reform and diminution.A published poll of Labor Party members of Parliament revealed that more than half of them want to see the monarchy reformed and that nearly one-quarter want it abolished.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau | November 19, 1993
LONDON -- Queen Elizabeth II opened a new session of Parliament yesterday with pomp and pageantry and her required reading of the reigning government's "back to basics" legislative program.Enthroned in the House of Lords with Prince Philip bemedaled at her side, the queen, in her diamond-encrusted imperial crown, read a concise, condensed version of the proposed legislation in about 10 minutes. Her voice rang out firm and high and thin in the Gothic hall.Arrayed before her were the lords in scarlet and ermine, the judges of the realm bewigged and robed, the ambassadors to the Court of St. James's in morning coats and striped pants and, in the back, members of the House of Commons.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | January 26, 1993
LONDON -- The monarchy has again floated to the top of the agenda of serious issues in Britain; debates over its future rage in the press, in the House of Commons, even within the Church of England.Paddy Ashdown, the leader of the Liberal Democratic Party, on Sunday became the first major party leader to call for the monarchy's reform and diminution.A published poll of Labor Party members of Parliament revealed that more than half of them want to see the monarchy reformed and that nearly one-quarter want it abolished.
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