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BUSINESS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1997
SEVERNA PARK -- A Cooksville man became the new owner of an historic mansion on the Severn River and a newer house next door yesterday for just over $1.5 million in an absolute auction.Signaling high hopes that the large, lavish Wroxeter-on-Severn would bring a price as distinguished as the mansion, auctioneer Eddie Haynes opened the bidding at $5 million -- which none of the seven registered bidders was willing to pay.So Haynes quickly walked the asking price down, $1 million at a time -- ending up finally at $1.1 million.
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NEWS
May 26, 2011
After reading your editorial on President Obama's remarks on Israel ("Obama's un-radical Israel policy," May 24), I wondered if the entire Sun editorial staff lives in a gated community. For Israel to cede its borders to a Palestinian state is like protecting your house by locking the bedroom door and totally disregarding the open windows and unlocked front door. During my lifetime I have seen Israel make one concession after another in the spirit of peace, only to have them taken for weakness or exploited through acts of terrorism and war. Even today, Palestinians are calling Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's recent speech to Congress an act of war. Would you give the convicts in a halfway house next door free reign to come into your house, or permit them to commit any illegal acts they pleased?
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BUSINESS
By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 2, 1997
In 1989, when Karen Pearce-Howell needed a house that was smaller than her nine-bedroom home in Roland Park, she just moved next door.She had lived in the large home near the Friends School since she moved to Baltimore from Boston in 1978.When she needed a smaller home for herself and two children, she found it in the stone-fronted, 1 1/2 -story home just behind her."I didn't have to relocate," she said, noting that, in addition to other ties to the neighborhood, her children attended Friends.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2010
On Dundalk's Railway Avenue, everyone knew Lee Martin. As the owner of Hop's Inn, he would stand you a drink if you were short of cash. Sometimes, if things were bad, he'd lend you a few bucks. On New Year's Eve every year, his patrons recall, drinks were on the house. That's why no one in the neighborhood seems to understand why anyone would want to kill him. Martin, 43, was fatally shot early Saturday by two assailants just after he had closed for the night and was walking the few steps to his house next door.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2000
Jeff Underwood can't complain: He commutes 25 feet to work each morning. That's because Underwood, a real estate broker, and his wife, Shari, bought the house next door and use their first home primarily as an office for his budding real estate business. With both Columbia homes, the Underwoods have nearly 3,800 square feet of living space, eight bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, two yards and two driveways. Three of the bedrooms in their first house are used as offices for Jeff's business, while the couple make their home with their two boys, Jack and Kevin, next door in the home they bought in March 1999.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 29, 2002
More than 40 years ago, John Guerriero vowed to his wife, Angelina, that he would take her back to her roots. So it was that he built a home right next door to the small one in which she was born in Little Italy. Today, there is an almost Oz-like feeling that envelops a visitor upon approaching the house in the 200 block of S. Exeter St. "We're not in Little Italy anymore," the feeling seems to say. The house is constructed of tan brick, contrasting sharply with the darker facade of the adjacent St. Leo Roman Catholic Church's rectory.
NEWS
March 20, 1999
A Baltimore woman died last night in a house fire in the 2700 block of Boone St., just east of Greenmount Avenue.Firefighters could not confirm the woman's age or name, said Battalion Chief Hector L. Torres, a Fire Department spokesman. However, neighbors told them the woman and several men had been living in the vacant house.The fire began about 6 p.m., burning out the first floor and extensively damaging the second. It caused an estimated $15,000 damage to the house and another $5,000 damage to a house next door.
BUSINESS
By MARIE GULLARD and MARIE GULLARD,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 2005
From the back garden of Sandra Seward's rowhouse in Federal Hill, the bustle of downtown Baltimore's Inner Harbor seems miles away instead of a few blocks. That suits her just fine. "We bought the house next door so we could take over the garden," Seward said, pointing to an adjacent structure with a second-floor wrought-iron balcony and fence. While the fronts of the two Warren Avenue homes are attached, further back each narrows by two feet, forming a walkway, or sally port, between them.
NEWS
By William B. Talbott and William B. Talbott,Evening Sun Staff Elisha King contributed to this story | July 2, 1991
A mother and her three children were forced from their home early this morning when a two-alarm fire severely damaged two houses in the 1300 block of Argyle Avenue.Denita Green, 27, said she was sleeping on the first floor of her rowhouse when a neighbor knocked on the door and told her that the house next door was on fire.Green rushed to the second floor of her home and woke Louise, 11; Vashon, 8; and Maria, 5, and led them outside to safety. The family was later relocated by the Red Cross.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | December 11, 1992
Amid high winds, cold and rain, firefighters from four station battled a two-alarm blaze at a house in Eldersburg last night."The thing that made it a bad night was the wind blowing," said Deputy Chief Ed Ruch of the Sykesville fire department.He said it took about 60 firefighters from the Sykesville station and from Gamber, Winfield and Liberty Road in Baltimore County to extinguish the blaze in the 1900 block of Blacksmith Drive.But by the time it was out, the fire had destroyed a garage attached to the house and the two cars that were parked in it.The fire, which started in the garage, spread directly up to the master bedroom, which collapsed into the garage.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | October 27, 2008
I am writing to report that I didn't cry. I burned (more on that later). But I didn't cry at my son's wedding. There was big money riding on me to disrupt the service with gasping sobs. But I showed everybody I am made of tougher stuff. Joe and Brooke were married on the most beautiful October day in anyone's memory. He looked like a recruiting poster in his Marine dress uniform. She looked like a raven-haired angel, wearing a wedding dress as stark white as his uniform pants and a smile that, hours later, still had not dimmed.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | May 17, 2008
Most days, the little white house is quiet. Robins bob through buttercups on the front lawn, then dart off into the fields surrounding the house. The horse on the mailbox is frozen in a silent gallop. But today will bring a very different scene. Hundreds of cars will crowd around the little house, and the fields will be full of people chatting about track conditions, black-eyed Susans and horses with grand names like Big Brown or Giant Moon. Once the white brick house stood among many others in a quiet neighborhood flanking the Pimlico racetrack.
BUSINESS
By MARIE GULLARD and MARIE GULLARD,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 2005
From the back garden of Sandra Seward's rowhouse in Federal Hill, the bustle of downtown Baltimore's Inner Harbor seems miles away instead of a few blocks. That suits her just fine. "We bought the house next door so we could take over the garden," Seward said, pointing to an adjacent structure with a second-floor wrought-iron balcony and fence. While the fronts of the two Warren Avenue homes are attached, further back each narrows by two feet, forming a walkway, or sally port, between them.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2004
Westminster officials have voted to buy two houses as a part of a homeownership program for low-income families and to revitalize one of the city's more troubled neighborhoods. The Common Council unanimously approved this week the use of nearly $127,000 to buy two one-bedroom, one-bathroom townhouses that participantsin the city's homeownership program can purchase. The sales are expected to close within a month. The city's housing director hopes the purchases will bring long-term stability to a neighborhood where its families can usually afford only rentals.
BUSINESS
By SUSAN L. TOWERS and SUSAN L. TOWERS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 2003
LEWES, Del. - While vacationing along the Lewes-Rehoboth Canal in 1967, Joe and Anne Muckerman saw a Depression-era Tudor cottage they knew they would live in some day. At the time, the couple was living at the U.S. Army barracks in Carlisle, Pa., where Joe Muckerman was an instructor at the Army War College. The steep-roofed cottage was a modest one, built in 1928. Its exterior was of stucco with an unusual stone trim said to be from the Cape Henlopen lighthouse that collapsed in 1926.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 29, 2002
More than 40 years ago, John Guerriero vowed to his wife, Angelina, that he would take her back to her roots. So it was that he built a home right next door to the small one in which she was born in Little Italy. Today, there is an almost Oz-like feeling that envelops a visitor upon approaching the house in the 200 block of S. Exeter St. "We're not in Little Italy anymore," the feeling seems to say. The house is constructed of tan brick, contrasting sharply with the darker facade of the adjacent St. Leo Roman Catholic Church's rectory.
NEWS
May 26, 2011
After reading your editorial on President Obama's remarks on Israel ("Obama's un-radical Israel policy," May 24), I wondered if the entire Sun editorial staff lives in a gated community. For Israel to cede its borders to a Palestinian state is like protecting your house by locking the bedroom door and totally disregarding the open windows and unlocked front door. During my lifetime I have seen Israel make one concession after another in the spirit of peace, only to have them taken for weakness or exploited through acts of terrorism and war. Even today, Palestinians are calling Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's recent speech to Congress an act of war. Would you give the convicts in a halfway house next door free reign to come into your house, or permit them to commit any illegal acts they pleased?
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1999
A one-alarm fire, caused by a bag of mulch that ignited, severely damaged an Ellicott City house yesterday afternoon, causing an estimated $350,000 in damage, a fire official said.Howard County Fire Capt. David Carroll said the fire broke out just after 5 p.m. at a residence in the 10170 block of Bracken Drive.Firefighters from Howard and Baltimore counties extinguished the fire in about two hours, Carroll said.At the back of the house, a bag of mulch, which was left next to the outside vent of a pellet stove, was ignited by the stove's heat, Carroll said.
BUSINESS
By Colleen Freyvogel and Colleen Freyvogel,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2002
When Daniel Taylor bought his three-story rowhouse on South Ellwood Avenue in Canton almost eight years ago, it was anything but a dream. The 2,200-square-foot house was full of outdated plumbing, holes in the half-painted walls, garbage, rats and cockroaches. Taylor, a manager for a local radio station, was renting a first-floor apartment from his brother Mike in 1994 when the house next door went up for sale. Taylor was determined to buy it with the aid of a 203(k) rehab loan from the Federal Housing Administration and the help of his other brother, Kevin, who had a contracting company.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2002
For the past couple of years, William Baker has been part custodian and part constable for the house next door to his neatly kept home in Northwest Baltimore. He has shooed off vagrants and potential vandals and tried to spruce up the yard of the vacant property at 3803 N. Rogers Ave. -- a 2 1/2 -story wood-frame house that is a mass of peeling brown paint and sagging gutters. "We cut the grass sometimes. We get the leaves up. We try to keep it halfway decent," said Baker, who has lived in a brick duplex next door in the Howard Park neighborhood for 40 years.
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