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By Rashod D. Ollison | February 10, 2005
IT WASN'T until I started hanging in clubs after college that I found house music. The friends I made in Philly, New York and, especially, Chicago loved the stuff. Initially, I found much of it too repetitive, the beat too hard. I'd sit back in the clubs and watch folks on the floor writhe, jerk and sweat away to the pounding, mechanical music as if they were all possessed. Wall to wall, back to back, they were slaves to the beat. And I'd sip my cocktail, thinking: "Nah. I don't get it."
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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
The Barn Crab House, the longtime Carney destination for steamed crabs and live music, has closed.  The Facebook page for the venue was boiling over with concern on Tuesday morning, and later in the day, Paul Wisner, one of the Barn's current co-owners, sent out an email confirming the news: "I regret to inform everyone that due to circumstances beyond my control, management and extenuating circumstances over the past year that has just recently...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | August 7, 2008
The difference is striking. In the Netherlands this past April, trance DJ Armin van Buuren spun for an exhausting nine hours in front of a sea of more than 15,000 fans. Sunday, he's a headliner in the Virgin Mobile Festival's 3,000-person-capacity Dance Tent. His slot is only two hours. The shorter set and smaller crowd reflect the drastic differences between club music fans in Europe and here in the United States. Overseas, big name DJs like van Buuren regularly draw thousands to festivals in countries across Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 24, 2011
We've had a lot of unusual candidates for president this year, but perhaps none is stranger than Jersey Shore's Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi, who proposed an authoritarian, pro-tanning platform for president on tonight's season finale of the biggest hit show in MTV history. Among Snooks' proposals are mandatory tanning laws for all Americans and a presidential edict banning all forms of music from radio other than "house. " Her vice presidential nominee? Veteran political analyst Deena Nicole Cortese, of course.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 24, 2011
We've had a lot of unusual candidates for president this year, but perhaps none is stranger than Jersey Shore's Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi, who proposed an authoritarian, pro-tanning platform for president on tonight's season finale of the biggest hit show in MTV history. Among Snooks' proposals are mandatory tanning laws for all Americans and a presidential edict banning all forms of music from radio other than "house. " Her vice presidential nominee? Veteran political analyst Deena Nicole Cortese, of course.
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff | August 30, 1991
3/8 TC TOO-HYPE HOUSE music thunders all around Leon Harris III, who sits on a bar stool away from the crowd to scope out the scene -- the blinking, frenzied lights flashing across the dark room, intermittently shining on faces, far-out hairdos and colorful baseball caps.A mass of people swirls around him. His eyes follow mini-skirted and T-shirted young girls headed for the dance floor in a conga line, each with a hand on another's side and one arm raised in the air, swaying to the funky beat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 25, 1999
Bandleader, DJ and multi-instrumentalist Moby calls his new album "Play." And if his day-to-day life had a title, it would probably be "Fly." "Our touring schedule has been really scattershot," he says, over the phone from a hotel just outside Paris. "Like, we did two and a half months in the States, and then we did three weeks in Europe. Then two weeks in the States. Then four days in Europe. Then 10 days in the States. "We just finished Italy and France, and now we're going to Thailand, and then Australia and New Zealand, then back to America.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 21, 2005
What is this?" I wanted to know. I was at a friend's studio apartment in Philadelphia and he had slipped on a mix tape of some of the most urgent music I'd ever heard. It was repetitive, the layered, cheaply produced beats booming with angry energy. "That's from B-more," he said. "This is what they play in the clubs down there." I frowned. "Not feeling it. What else you got?" Five years later, I move to Charm City and go out to a dingy little downtown joint with another club-music-loving friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | May 1, 2003
Like millions of PC users, I have a collection of digital music stored on a computer in the basement. That's a fine arrangement when I'm working, but useless if I want to relax in an easy chair and listen to those tunes on the stereo upstairs in the family room. Not surprisingly, hardware manufacturers are rushing to fill this void with a variety of new gadgets. At the high end, they're introducing elaborate set-top boxes that act as multimedia servers for video and music on a home network.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
The Barn Crab House, the longtime Carney destination for steamed crabs and live music, has closed.  The Facebook page for the venue was boiling over with concern on Tuesday morning, and later in the day, Paul Wisner, one of the Barn's current co-owners, sent out an email confirming the news: "I regret to inform everyone that due to circumstances beyond my control, management and extenuating circumstances over the past year that has just recently...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | August 7, 2008
The difference is striking. In the Netherlands this past April, trance DJ Armin van Buuren spun for an exhausting nine hours in front of a sea of more than 15,000 fans. Sunday, he's a headliner in the Virgin Mobile Festival's 3,000-person-capacity Dance Tent. His slot is only two hours. The shorter set and smaller crowd reflect the drastic differences between club music fans in Europe and here in the United States. Overseas, big name DJs like van Buuren regularly draw thousands to festivals in countries across Europe.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 18, 2007
He was on his best behavior. Sort of. Pop-R&B sensation Akon played a packed house at Rams Head Live Wednesday night, barely a week after Verizon ended its partnership with the Senegalese star after a video surfaced that showed him simulating sex onstage with a 15-year-old girl during an April 12 concert in Trinidad. The broadband and telecommunications company, which had promoted Akon as one of the musicians on its mobile-phone music service, said it would no longer sponsor Gwen Stefani's summer tour, which features the singer-songwriter as the opening act. At Rams Head Live, Akon didn't seem fazed as he breezed through cuts from his two multiplatinum albums: 2004's Trouble and last year's Konvicted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 21, 2005
What is this?" I wanted to know. I was at a friend's studio apartment in Philadelphia and he had slipped on a mix tape of some of the most urgent music I'd ever heard. It was repetitive, the layered, cheaply produced beats booming with angry energy. "That's from B-more," he said. "This is what they play in the clubs down there." I frowned. "Not feeling it. What else you got?" Five years later, I move to Charm City and go out to a dingy little downtown joint with another club-music-loving friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | February 10, 2005
IT WASN'T until I started hanging in clubs after college that I found house music. The friends I made in Philly, New York and, especially, Chicago loved the stuff. Initially, I found much of it too repetitive, the beat too hard. I'd sit back in the clubs and watch folks on the floor writhe, jerk and sweat away to the pounding, mechanical music as if they were all possessed. Wall to wall, back to back, they were slaves to the beat. And I'd sip my cocktail, thinking: "Nah. I don't get it."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | May 1, 2003
Like millions of PC users, I have a collection of digital music stored on a computer in the basement. That's a fine arrangement when I'm working, but useless if I want to relax in an easy chair and listen to those tunes on the stereo upstairs in the family room. Not surprisingly, hardware manufacturers are rushing to fill this void with a variety of new gadgets. At the high end, they're introducing elaborate set-top boxes that act as multimedia servers for video and music on a home network.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 25, 1999
Bandleader, DJ and multi-instrumentalist Moby calls his new album "Play." And if his day-to-day life had a title, it would probably be "Fly." "Our touring schedule has been really scattershot," he says, over the phone from a hotel just outside Paris. "Like, we did two and a half months in the States, and then we did three weeks in Europe. Then two weeks in the States. Then four days in Europe. Then 10 days in the States. "We just finished Italy and France, and now we're going to Thailand, and then Australia and New Zealand, then back to America.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 18, 2007
He was on his best behavior. Sort of. Pop-R&B sensation Akon played a packed house at Rams Head Live Wednesday night, barely a week after Verizon ended its partnership with the Senegalese star after a video surfaced that showed him simulating sex onstage with a 15-year-old girl during an April 12 concert in Trinidad. The broadband and telecommunications company, which had promoted Akon as one of the musicians on its mobile-phone music service, said it would no longer sponsor Gwen Stefani's summer tour, which features the singer-songwriter as the opening act. At Rams Head Live, Akon didn't seem fazed as he breezed through cuts from his two multiplatinum albums: 2004's Trouble and last year's Konvicted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 2002
It's the weekend and you're looking for some fun - a night out on the town, to be specific. You'd like to go dancing, hear a local band, check out the hot new DJ everyone's talking about or maybe meet some new people. Trouble is, you're under 21, and that puts limits on your enjoyment of the night life. What's a person not of legal drinking age to do when that person wants to go nightclubbing? Well, if you're 18 to 20, you can get into a number of clubs (and bars) in the area; you just can't drink alcohol.
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff | August 30, 1991
3/8 TC TOO-HYPE HOUSE music thunders all around Leon Harris III, who sits on a bar stool away from the crowd to scope out the scene -- the blinking, frenzied lights flashing across the dark room, intermittently shining on faces, far-out hairdos and colorful baseball caps.A mass of people swirls around him. His eyes follow mini-skirted and T-shirted young girls headed for the dance floor in a conga line, each with a hand on another's side and one arm raised in the air, swaying to the funky beat.
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