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By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Rep. Donna Edwards, a Prince George's County Democrat, is again ranked among the most liberal members of the House of Representatives, according to an annual review of roll call votes by National Journal. Edwards tied for first place in the rankings with 13 other Democrats, including Bobby Rush of Illinois and Pete Stark of California. Baltimore Rep. Elijah E. Cummings was tied for 20th place in the liberal rankings with House Democratic Caucus chairman Xavier Becerra of California.
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NEWS
October 17, 2013
Michael Ernest is correct when he says in his letter ("Democrats are to blame for the government shutdown," Oct. 15), that "It is a fact that House members have the right to make such spending decisions. " Similarly, the president of the United States and the U.S. Senate have a right to veto or vote against such spending decisions. They also have a right to veto or vote against every single spending bill brought by the House unless the House votes in specified ways. Just like the House has a right to prevent any bill to come up for a vote that does not contain a repeal of Obamacare.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- If they leave office at the end of their terms next year, 165 House members could pocket $41 million in leftover campaign money for personal use, says a study made public yesterday.But if they stay in office beyond 1992, federal law would prohibit them from using the money for anything but expenses related to their campaigns or public duties.The study, by the Center for Public Integrity, a non-profit research group based in Washington, found that the House members amassed these "golden parachutes" because most had such weak opponents, if any at all, that they barely used their campaign treasuries to win re-election last year.
NEWS
June 19, 2013
Two-thirds of American voters support Roe v. Wade. Women overwhelmingly favored Barack Obama over Mitt Romney, the Republican who wanted to de-fund Planned Parenthood and overturn Roe. Public approval of Congress is at or near its lowest level ever recorded, and public overall has an even worse opinion of the GOP than of Democrats. So naturally with all these facts in mind, it was time for the House Republicans to band together to pass legislation that restricts women's right to choose in a manner that is not only patently unconstitutional but has no chance of passage in the Senate whatsoever.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Staff Writer | January 29, 1994
PINEY POINT, Maryland -- They work days so packed with appointments, their time is doled out in tiny dollops. They stand for re-election so often the campaign fund raising and stumping back home never seems to end.Instead of thanks from a grateful electorate, they are widely scorned by the press and the public as a collection of crooks, philanderers and overpaid dolts.Even here, at a private retreat in St. Mary's County for Democratic House members, one of President Clinton's top advisers felt free to poke fun at them.
NEWS
By Sara Fritz and Sara Fritz,Los Angeles Times | June 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Despite growing criticism of congressional perks and a newly imposed ban on honorariums, many House members made no effort to scale back on trips to posh resorts and exotic foreign destinations at the expense of special interests in 1991, according to financial disclosure documents made public yesterday.In addition to the usual all-expenses-paid junkets to such warm-weather havens as Boca Raton, Fla., Palm Springs, Calif., and Phoenix, Ariz., in 1991, members of Congress also traveled to Kuwait at the expense of Fluor Corp.
NEWS
March 18, 1999
CALL IT civility, call it congeniality, call it comity. Whatever the politically acceptable label, half of the House of Representatives, with spouses and children in tow, are headed for a "bipartisan retreat" in Hershey, Pa., this weekend.The aim is to restore respect and to soothe strained relations between Democrats and Republicans in an off-campus affair that features a Nobel Peace Prize winner and an actor intoning the speeches of Abraham Lincoln.Please hold the comments about "kiss and make up" and "sweetness and light" at the nation's chocolate capital.
NEWS
March 10, 1992
Some people just never get the word. With Congress as an institution in increasingly bad odor with the public, some of its leaders refuse to face up to the implications of the Great House Bank Scandal. Dozens, perhaps scores, of House members used what was really just supposed to be a payroll office as a personal, interest-free, unlimited line of credit. Nice perk, considering that their constituents were paying 12 to 19 percent interest for the same service. The so-called bank has been shut down, but an accounting of who abused the system is yet to be made public.
NEWS
January 16, 2003
HOUSE REPUBLICAN leaders celebrated the opening this month of a fifth congressional term under GOP control by loosening ethics rules. They blessed a time-honored practice of lobbyists sending food into congressional offices where the staff is working late. And they allowed House members to accept free travel to charity events, such as golf tournaments. Neither of these changes rates high on the outrage meter. They pale against the conflicts of interest inherent in the campaign finance system - and barely attracted notice when they were adopted last week along strict party lines.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | October 31, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In an act of shear politics, the House of Representatives trimmed its perquisites yesterday by sharply raising prices at its tax-subsidized barbershop.A House administration subcommittee doubled the tab for a basic haircut from $5 to $10 and bumped the bill for a shoeshine from 75 cents to $2 in the barbershop's first round of price increases since 1979.The action comes at a time when polls show voters are in a political lather over congressional benefits. An outcry arose recently over revelations that House members had bounced 8,000 checks at their cooperative bank and owed more than $300,000 at the House restaurant.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Rep. Donna Edwards, a Prince George's County Democrat, is again ranked among the most liberal members of the House of Representatives, according to an annual review of roll call votes by National Journal. Edwards tied for first place in the rankings with 13 other Democrats, including Bobby Rush of Illinois and Pete Stark of California. Baltimore Rep. Elijah E. Cummings was tied for 20th place in the liberal rankings with House Democratic Caucus chairman Xavier Becerra of California.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
When the votes from the 6th Congressional District were counted last week, John Delaney didn't just become Maryland's newest House member. He also became the state's newest employer. And as Delaney and his fellow members of the congressional Class of 2012 now head to Capitol Hill for freshman orientation, they'll also be reviewing resumes, interviewing job candidates and hiring the staff members whose work can be the difference between their success or failure in Washington. Every two years, Election Day marks the end of the campaign season and the start of a hiring frenzy, as dozens of new members choose from among thousands of candidates to fill highly coveted staff positions.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | September 18, 2012
Divided government has become a too-common feature of American national politics. In the six decades following the 1952 election, unified partisan control of the presidency and both chambers of Congress has been rare: the eight years of the Kennedy-Johnson era; all four years of Jimmy Carter's presidency; the first two of Bill Clinton's; the middle four years of the George W. Bush administration; and Barack Obama's first two years. That's 20 years out of 60 - a third of the time.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
The Maryland Senate passed Gov. Martin O'Malley's gambling expansion bill on a 28-14 vote Friday, sending the legislation to a more closely divided House of Delegates for a decision when the the General Assembly's special session continues into a second week Monday. Approval came in the early evening after senators spent much of the afternoon debating and defeating amendments proposed by Republicans and a conservative Democrat opponent of the key provision allowing a casino in Prince George's County.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | August 3, 2012
House Speaker Michael E. Busch  presided over a marathon meeting this afternoon of key leaders in his chamber on a gambling expansion bill. He briefly spoke with reporters when the group finished around 4:30 p.m. and said they'd made "some headway into what we believe will be the best possible product that we can put forward. " Busch downplayed talk that Internet gambling could be part of the legislation -- an idea he had floated in a memo that he sent to lawmakers on Wednesday evening.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
The work group set up by Gov.Martin O'Malleyto try to reach a consensus on whether to expand gambling in Maryland is continuing to meet behind closed doors as a Who's Who of the state's lobbying corp cools their heels outside a House committee room where the panel was scheduled to hold a public session at 1 p.m. About 3 p.m., alternate member Sen. George Edwards emerged to hit the road for Western Maryland and said it could be a while longer before...
NEWS
October 17, 2013
Michael Ernest is correct when he says in his letter ("Democrats are to blame for the government shutdown," Oct. 15), that "It is a fact that House members have the right to make such spending decisions. " Similarly, the president of the United States and the U.S. Senate have a right to veto or vote against such spending decisions. They also have a right to veto or vote against every single spending bill brought by the House unless the House votes in specified ways. Just like the House has a right to prevent any bill to come up for a vote that does not contain a repeal of Obamacare.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The rhetoric was at times lofty, the task solemn. But the House debate on the impeachment of the president yesterday sometimes played out more as partisan farce than as constitutional tragedy.The day's purpose was steeped in history: the first presidential impeachment debate in 130 years. And indeed, at 9: 30 a.m., when the House clerk read in full the four condemnatory articles of impeachment, a packed chamber sat in rapt attention, as though the proceedings were destined to live up to their billing.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
A state panel considering whether to expand gambling in Maryland failed to reach a consensus Wednesday, likely ending the possibility of a special General Assembly session on the issue this summer. The panel unanimously recommended a series of sweeping changes to the state's gambling law, but split 8-3 on the critical questions of whether to allow a sixth casino in Prince George's County and whether to change the current 67 percent tax rate on slot machine revenues. On those key questions, panel Chairman John Morton and the four members representing the O'Malley administration voted yes, along with the three Senate members.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2011
Officially, House Republicans retreated to Baltimore this week to hash out their legislative agenda: repealing health care reform, cutting government spending and fulfilling the other campaign promises that helped to sweep them into the majority. But they still had to eat, and their first two meals Friday provided much food for thought for the 2012 presidential race. Breakfast served up former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, while lunch was a buffet of GOP governors: Haley Barbour of Mississippi, Rick Perry of Texas and Bob McDonnell of Virginia.
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