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By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | June 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Maryland Rep. Steny H. Hoyer's chances of moving up the House leadership ladder have received a boost from Rep. Vic Fazio, a potential opponent who has decided to back Hoyer.Campaigning for the majority whip position, the third highes leadership post, is in full swing following the resignation announcement yesterday of Rep. William H. Gray, D-Pa., who will become president of the United Negro College Fund in September.The top two candidates for Gray's job are Hoyer, D-5th, who i chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, the fourth-ranked job, and Rep. David E. Bonior, D-Mich.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
The House Democratic leadership is expected to meet Wednesday in Annapolis to discuss a proposed special session to expand gambling in Maryland. A spokeswoman for House SpeakerMichael E. Busch confirmed that senior House leaders and key delegation chairs will meet at 4 p.m. The gathering could be crucial to any decision to call a special session. Busch is believed to be trying to round up the votes it would take to pass a gambling expansion in the House, which so far has been the obstacle to a deal that would allow a casino inPrince George's Countyin exchange for permitting table games there and at the five already approved sites.
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NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1996
THOMAS E. DEWBERRY, who has represented Baltimore County in the House of Delegates since 1989, gets to try on the mantle of senior House leadership.House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. tapped Dewberry as speaker pro tem last night after a daylong meeting with House leaders.Technically, Dewberry, 45, a lawyer who is a senior hearing examiner for the Public Service Commission, still must be elected to the post by the full House when it meets in January. But his "nomination" by Taylor is tantamount to an appointment.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | January 10, 2012
Del. Anthony J. O'Donnell was re-elected to a sixth term as the House GOP leader Tuesday, putting to rest any questions about an insurrection in his caucus. O'Donnell, of Calvert and St. Mary's counties, said his caucus would play defense this session, trying to "stop damage to our economy" that he believes Gov. Martin O'Malley and the Democratic led legislature will unleash.  He called the idea of increasing the gas tax "offensive" and "so out of sync with where we find oursevles.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau | May 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Twenty-two years ago, the fledgling Congressional Black Caucus, unable to get the attention of the White House, announced that it would boycott President Richard M. Nixon's State of the Union address.The gambit worked, getting the dozen-member group a substantial measure of publicity and, later, a meeting with the president.Four weeks ago, the caucus, grown 40-strong and headed by Rep. Kweisi Mfume of Baltimore, tried a different sort of boycott, a parliamentary move that stalled for nearly a month House consideration of a bill favored by the Clinton administration and the House Democratic leadership.
NEWS
November 22, 1992
The heavy turnover in membership of the House of Representatives next January will move surviving Democratic members of the Maryland delegation up the ladder to positions that will enhance the state's clout in Washington. With greater seniority, they could lay claim to seats on key committees, where the real work in Congress gets done.Most notable will be Rep. Steny H. Hoyer's expected selection as chairman of one of the Appropriations Committee's 13 subcommittees. These appropriations barons are known on the Hill as the "college of cardinals," a tribute to the power they wield as the dispensers of money, not just to government agencies but for pet projects of fellow members.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2001
For Del. Maggie L. McIntosh, the significance of her new job as majority leader of the House of Delegates is not the impressive title or the largely procedural duties on the floor. It's where she'll be when the House leadership hashes out its position on key issues. "The majority leader is always in the room when decisions get made," the Baltimore Democrat said this week. House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. named McIntosh, 53, to the majority leader post last month when the resignation of Del. Ron Guns to take a job on the Public Service Commission forced a reshuffle of the House leadership.
NEWS
By John W. Freceand C. Fraser Smith and John W. Freceand C. Fraser Smith,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | December 4, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., D-Kent, has decided to replace veteran Majority Leader John S. Arnick, D-Baltimore Co., with a relatively inexperienced but up-and-coming Western Maryland lawyer, Delegate D. Bruce Poole.Mr. Mitchell, according to legislators familiar with his new leadership lineup, also has decided to name another rural conservative lawmaker, Delegate Ronald A. Guns, D-Cecil, to replace Mr. Arnick as chairman of the Environmental Matters Committee. That panel considers environmental and health legislation, including matters dealing with abortion.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1998
The Democratic leaders of the House of Delegates proposed their version of a children's health insurance program yesterday, promising to work with Gov. Parris N. Glendening to combine the best elements of their two plans."
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2002
House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. said last night that he will introduce a bill to raise Maryland's cigarette tax by 34 cents a pack, with half of the money dedicated to public schools. But Taylor said the $50 million for education would not be intended to serve as a down payment on recommendations from the Thornton Commission, which has called for state support to public schools to increase by $1.1 billion annually over the next five years. "It would bridge the gap for one year until we can get to the Thornton-formula funding next year," Taylor said of the bill, which he hopes to introduce early next week.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2010
The historic Mount Vernon building that has long served as a haven for Baltimore women has officially opened its doors as the first all-girl, public middle school in the city. The Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women welcomed more than 200 students into its new facility on West Franklin Street earlier this month in the building that for nearly a century housed the headquarters of the Greater Baltimore Young Women's Christian Association. The Leadership School community, along with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and city school officials, will celebrate the grand opening with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 11 a.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
October 3, 2008
Main Street is feeling Wall Street's pain. Not as viscerally or explosively, but the impact of the U.S. financial crisis on average Americans is real. That connection has often been lost or glossed over in the ongoing debate over a $700 billion government rescue plan. But resolving the nation's financial woes is going to cost taxpayers one way or another. The overall cost is not yet known, but a Senate-approved version of the Bush administration's rescue package would provide a mechanism to relieve the credit crunch, some needed relief for consumers, oversight protections and limits on executive compensation.
NEWS
By Mike Dorning and Christi Parsons and Mike Dorning and Christi Parsons,Chicago Tribune | October 3, 2006
WASHINGTON -- House Speaker Dennis Hastert defended yesterday the Republican leadership's handling of a suggestive e-mail exchange between Rep. Mark Foley and an underage House page, conceding that the communication should have raised "a red flag" but arguing that their options were limited because the boy's parents wanted to avoid publicity. Hastert and other Republican leaders launched a campaign to contain the political damage from Foley's inappropriate messages, seeking to counter Democratic charges of a cover-up amid signs of discontent from the Republican Party's social conservative base.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2004
The Maryland League of Conservation Voters released a report yesterday saying state environmental initiatives have fared better in the past two years, in part because of improved leadership from the state House of Delegates and Senate. But the league's 12th General Assembly Scorecard pointed to a growing gap between the scores of Republican and Democratic lawmakers, with Republican scores continuing a downward trend. Republicans scored, on average, less than half as well as Democrats, the report said.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2003
The usually mundane race for who will lead Republicans in the House of Delegates has taken a nasty turn because of a battle over one candidate's support for abortion rights. In dispute is whether Del. Adelaide C. Eckardt's position on abortion makes her unfit to serve as the House minority whip, the second-ranking position in the GOP leadership. "I don't remember another race for leader as emotional as this race is," said Del. A. Wade Kach, a 29-year veteran of the House who is running on a ticket with Eckardt.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2002
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. glides past the guards with a quick "How ya doin'?" and swings open the doors to the private balcony of the speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives. The view is grand, sweeping down the front steps of the Capitol, across the reflecting pool and straight to the top of the Washington Monument. "See?" he says, after considering one of the nation's most iconic swaths of architecture. "There are advantages to being in the majority party." During his eight years in Congress, Ehrlich, 44, has blossomed within the Republican caucus, gaining membership in an elite group of whips, becoming a close friend of House Speaker Dennis Hastert, maneuvering himself onto a top committee and generally earning a reputation as a fellow to watch.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | July 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Maryland Rep. Steny H. Hoyer's climb up the House leadership ladder has been stalled by a lopsided defeat in an election for majority whip, the third-highest post.Michigan Rep. David E. Bonior, deputy majority whip, clobbered Hoyer 160-109 in a vote of House Democrats yesterday.Bonior is a liberal and a foe of abortion. As whip, he said, he will represent the abortion-rights views of the Democratic majoribut will vote his conscience on individual bills.Bonior said after the vote that he will advocate an agenda of "rebuilding America for working families," including tax relief and health care.
NEWS
By Ralph Nader | October 19, 1990
YOU'VE probably seen House Speaker Tom Foley on television recently answering a question or two on the progress of budget negotiations with the White House. He looks like a graying, friendly uncle who is a voice for moderation and kindliness -- even toward his political opponents -- the Republicans.That's the public Tom Foley. The political infighter who presides over the House of Representatives is quite another Tom Foley. Listen to the self-styled "tough guy" in the House -- James A. Traficant Jr., D-Ohio.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2002
House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. said last night that he will introduce a bill to raise Maryland's cigarette tax by 34 cents a pack, with half of the money dedicated to public schools. But Taylor said the $50 million for education would not be intended to serve as a down payment on recommendations from the Thornton Commission, which has called for state support to public schools to increase by $1.1 billion annually over the next five years. "It would bridge the gap for one year until we can get to the Thornton-formula funding next year," Taylor said of the bill, which he hopes to introduce early next week.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2001
For Del. Maggie L. McIntosh, the significance of her new job as majority leader of the House of Delegates is not the impressive title or the largely procedural duties on the floor. It's where she'll be when the House leadership hashes out its position on key issues. "The majority leader is always in the room when decisions get made," the Baltimore Democrat said this week. House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. named McIntosh, 53, to the majority leader post last month when the resignation of Del. Ron Guns to take a job on the Public Service Commission forced a reshuffle of the House leadership.
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