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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 2, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The timetable now set for the House to weigh the fate of Speaker Newt Gingrich has put new pressure on Republican lawmakers, who must decide in a virtual vacuum of information about his ethics transgressions whether to retain him as speaker.The House ethics committee announced on Tuesday that it would not begin the final phase of its proceedings against Gingrich until Jan. 8, the day after the full House is to vote on whether he remains speaker for a second term.As a result, the lawmakers will be casting their ballots without having heard the full case made against him by the outside counsel the panel hired to oversee the Gingrich ethics inquiry, and without the political cover of a recommendation from the ethics committee on what punishment the House should impose.
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NEWS
By Richard Simon and Nicole Gaouette and Richard Simon and Nicole Gaouette,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 5, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Returning to power for the first time in 12 years, House Democrats elected Nancy Pelosi as the first female speaker yesterday and moved swiftly to adopt rules to rein in the influence of lobbyists. Pelosi, also the first Californian to lead the House, and new Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, a Nevada Democrat, put President Bush on notice that they intend to press for a new U.S. policy on Iraq. "The election of 2006 was a call to change - not merely to change the control of Congress, but for a new direction for our country," Pelosi said.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 27, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The House ethics committee raised four new charges against House Speaker Newt Gingrich yesterday, including the potentially devastating question of whether he has provided its investigation with "accurate, reliable and complete information."The committee of five Republicans and five Democrats voted unanimously to announce the expansion of its inquiry to add the new issues. No details were released about those questions, which included two new tax law issues and the question of whether he improperly used staff and facilities of a private foundation.
NEWS
By Noam N. Levey and Noam N. Levey,Los Angeles Times | December 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In a coda to a year of political disasters for Republicans, the House ethics committee declared yesterday that GOP lawmakers and staff members for years remained "willfully ignorant" that former Rep. Mark Foley was making sexual advances toward male congressional pages. Instead, driven by political considerations and fear of exposing Foley's homosexuality, they failed in their duty to protect the teenagers, the committee concluded. And, the panel said, congressional officials ignored evidence of predatory behavior by the Florida Republican that began emerging more than 10 years ago. Despite these criticisms, the bipartisan ethics panel found that no House rules were broken in the handling of the Foley case.
NEWS
By Sam Singer and Sam Singer,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 23, 2005
WASHINGTON - After months of partisan bickering, the House ethics committee is up and running, meaning a host of lawmakers could find themselves under investigation and Democrats could find ammunition for their denunciations of a Republican "culture of corruption," which they are making a central theme of the 2006 congressional elections. But just what role the newly reactivated ethics committee will play in Capitol Hill's hot-blooded political climate remains to be seen. Some say the panel will remain toothless, hamstrung by rules designed to protect lawmakers, while others foresee a return to the tit-for-tat ethical wrangling of the late 1980s and early 1990s.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2005
WASHINGTON - Faced with mounting evidence that current ethics rules do not cover new ways lobbyists have devised to curry favor with members of Congress, the House Ethics committee plans to unveil an array of proposed changes this year. But the proposals appear likely to loosen ethics restrictions, not tighten them. One change would let special interests begin to pay some of a congressman's official operating expenses. Another would increase the number of family members allowed to go on junkets paid for by private interests, a move seen as weakening the rules designed to keep members of Congress independent of outside groups.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 11, 2005
WASHINGTON - House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, whose aggressive use of power has earned him ethics reprimands in the past, is drawing fresh fire on Capitol Hill this week over his role in a Texas political-financing operation and reports of possible travel irregularities in violation of House of Representatives rules. House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi yesterday renewed her call for the House ethics committee to determine whether DeLay's activities require further investigation. Some House Republicans worried that the revival of an ethics flap surrounding DeLay could distract him from pushing President Bush's second-term agenda.
NEWS
November 13, 1996
The Associated Press erroneously reported yesterday that Rep. Christopher Shays, a Connecticut Republican, has called for House Speaker Newt Gingrich to step aside until the House ethics committee completes its investigation of charges against him. Shays said he would not vote on the House floor for Gingrich as speaker in January unless the report of the ethics committee's independent counsel has been released by then.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 11/13/96
NEWS
April 26, 2006
Much of the biggest news out of Congress recently could have come from a police blotter. The House majority leader is indicted in Texas on political corruption charges. A former top aide to the majority leader pleads guilty to running an unrelated criminal enterprise out of the leader's office, and a second former aide admits to bilking lobbying clients out of $20 million. Another congressman goes to the slammer for directing defense contracts to lobbyists who plied him with $2.4 million in personal gifts.
NEWS
By Gary Ruskin | January 7, 2005
ON SEPT. 27, 1994, more than 300 Republican candidates for the U.S. House of Representatives stood on the steps of the U.S. Capitol and endorsed the Contract With America, "to restore the bonds of trust between the people and their elected representatives." Those Republicans rightly criticized the corrupt book deal of former Speaker Jim Wright, a Texas Democrat, as well as the House Bank scandal. They correctly observed that entrenched majorities tend to become corrupt. Together, they held themselves out as the party of reform, "to restore accountability to Congress.
NEWS
By Wally Roche and Wally Roche,Los Angeles Times | October 8, 2006
A former House page says he had sex with then-Rep. Mark A. Foley after receiving explicit e-mails in which the Florida congressman described assessing the sexual orientation and physical attributes of underage pages but waiting until later to make direct advances. The former page, who agreed to discuss his relationship with Foley with the Los Angeles Times on the condition that he not be identified, said his electronic correspondence with Foley began after he finished the respected Capitol Hill program for high school juniors.
NEWS
April 26, 2006
Much of the biggest news out of Congress recently could have come from a police blotter. The House majority leader is indicted in Texas on political corruption charges. A former top aide to the majority leader pleads guilty to running an unrelated criminal enterprise out of the leader's office, and a second former aide admits to bilking lobbying clients out of $20 million. Another congressman goes to the slammer for directing defense contracts to lobbyists who plied him with $2.4 million in personal gifts.
NEWS
By GWYNETH K. SHAW and GWYNETH K. SHAW,SUN REPORTER | February 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- House Republicans are taking over a luxury resort on the Eastern Shore for a conference that will feature a speech by President Bush and closed-door strategy sessions about changing Congress' ethics and lobbying rules. More than 160 of the 231 Republican representatives are expected to attend the event, which starts today, at the Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay Golf Resort, Spa and Marina in Cambridge. The annual gathering is a chance for House Republicans to discuss their legislative agenda and the fall elections with party leaders and pollsters.
NEWS
By Sam Singer and Sam Singer,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 23, 2005
WASHINGTON - After months of partisan bickering, the House ethics committee is up and running, meaning a host of lawmakers could find themselves under investigation and Democrats could find ammunition for their denunciations of a Republican "culture of corruption," which they are making a central theme of the 2006 congressional elections. But just what role the newly reactivated ethics committee will play in Capitol Hill's hot-blooded political climate remains to be seen. Some say the panel will remain toothless, hamstrung by rules designed to protect lawmakers, while others foresee a return to the tit-for-tat ethical wrangling of the late 1980s and early 1990s.
NEWS
April 29, 2005
HOUSE SPEAKER Dennis Hastert's decision to retreat this week on ethics changes apparently designed to protect his majority leader, Tom DeLay, was a bow to the inevitable. Republican rank-and-file members were hearing from constituents who may not give a fig about Tom DeLay or particular ethics requirements but detected an odor from Washington they didn't like. By giving in to demands from Democrats that unilateral changes in the bipartisan process be dropped, the speaker moved to take the wind out of a controversy that has overshadowed other House business and threatened to tar all of its members.
NEWS
April 10, 2005
DON'T THINK House Majority Leader Tom DeLay isn't sensitive to criticism. Just a couple of years ago, he abandoned his trademark plastered-down hairstyle for a trendier blow-dried look because, he said, "I got tired of being called a helmet head." He just can't seem to figure out, though, how to put to rest the flurry of ethics allegations now being hurled at him on almost a daily basis. He tried dismantling the House Ethics Committee, changing the subject to Terri Schiavo and launching an offensive against the federal judiciary.
NEWS
January 20, 1997
NEWT GINGRICH is about to become the only speaker of the House ever to be formally reprimanded by his colleagues. This is something his fellow Republicans either have to live with or conclude that having a discredited speaker in the chair is an unacceptable impediment to the GOP agenda. They will get no help from Democrats who believe Mr. Gingrich's retention in office is their best defense against assaults on President Clinton, who begins his second term today.Mr. Gingrich's conduct in defending himself on charges of using tax-exempt money to finance his political activities has been assailed by the House ethics committee as an "intentional . . . or reckless" affront to House rules.
NEWS
January 22, 1997
NEWT GINGRICH, in our considered judgment, would be rejected as speaker of the House of Representatives if his colleagues were given a chance to register a second opinion.Yesterday he was officially reprimanded and handed a $300,000 penalty by an overwhelming vote of 395-28, thus becoming the first speaker ever to suffer such a humiliation. He is the likely target of an Internal Revenue Service probe as to whether he violated tax laws by financing his political activity through tax-exempt charitable contributions.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 11, 2005
WASHINGTON - House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, whose aggressive use of power has earned him ethics reprimands in the past, is drawing fresh fire on Capitol Hill this week over his role in a Texas political-financing operation and reports of possible travel irregularities in violation of House of Representatives rules. House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi yesterday renewed her call for the House ethics committee to determine whether DeLay's activities require further investigation. Some House Republicans worried that the revival of an ethics flap surrounding DeLay could distract him from pushing President Bush's second-term agenda.
NEWS
By Gary Ruskin | January 7, 2005
ON SEPT. 27, 1994, more than 300 Republican candidates for the U.S. House of Representatives stood on the steps of the U.S. Capitol and endorsed the Contract With America, "to restore the bonds of trust between the people and their elected representatives." Those Republicans rightly criticized the corrupt book deal of former Speaker Jim Wright, a Texas Democrat, as well as the House Bank scandal. They correctly observed that entrenched majorities tend to become corrupt. Together, they held themselves out as the party of reform, "to restore accountability to Congress.
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