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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton sent his long-awaited fast-track trade bill on to Congress yesterday, but it received a lukewarm reception that suggests the White House faces an uphill battle to secure House and Senate approval.The legislation is designed to open the way for a broad array of trade negotiations, including expansion of the controversial North American Free Trade Agreement to Chile, by guaranteeing that Congress will not seek to unravel any new trade agreements the White House hammers out.However, in a bow to the Republicans who control Congress, Clinton rejected demands by unions and conservation groups that any new agreement contain tough labor and environmental standards as part of the basic trade accords -- and thus enforceable through U.S. trade sanctions.
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NEWS
October 30, 2007
The toxic combination of fear, anger, frustration and righteousness that poisons the immigration debate has reached the point that even innocent - but undocumented - children cannot win a reprieve from Congress. What's more, the majority-party Democrats, who at one point joined with President Bush against conservative Republicans to support reforms that would bring those here illegally out of the shadows, are now tilting toward the sorts of security measures favored by Americans who believe that somehow 12 million people can be driven away.
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NEWS
By Noam N. Levey and Noam N. Levey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 25, 2007
WASHINGTON -- As congressional Democrats move to force President Bush to veto a war spending bill that would start a withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq, they are simultaneously pursuing a carefully crafted offensive aimed at another target: Republican lawmakers. In the charged debate over the war, the strategy aims to achieve Democratic objectives on both policy and political fronts, according to party leaders and aides. Convinced that Bush will never listen to their calls to bring troops home, senior Democrats have concluded that they must force Republicans to vote again and again in defense of the unpopular war until enough plead with the president to change course.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | May 24, 2007
WASHINGTON -- For anti-war activists, turning against House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer was only the beginning. The liberal group MoveOn.org ran radio ads this week chastising the Southern Maryland Democrat for voting against a measure that would have forced a withdrawal from Iraq within 180 days. But that attack ad was nothing compared with the vitriol unleashed yesterday, as war opponents lit into the rest of the Democratic leadership for agreeing to drop a withdrawal timeline from the Iraq spending bill.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | January 24, 1993
Leaders of the Clinton administration and most of the Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives will retreat to Baltimore for two days this week to discuss issues.This year's conference of the House Democratic Caucus, to be held at the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus, will have a new wrinkle.For the first time since the caucus began its annual conferences in 1982, there will be a Democratic president in the White House, not just a Democratic majority in Congress."It's a different feeling," said Rep. Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland's 5th District, the caucus chairman.
NEWS
October 30, 2007
The toxic combination of fear, anger, frustration and righteousness that poisons the immigration debate has reached the point that even innocent - but undocumented - children cannot win a reprieve from Congress. What's more, the majority-party Democrats, who at one point joined with President Bush against conservative Republicans to support reforms that would bring those here illegally out of the shadows, are now tilting toward the sorts of security measures favored by Americans who believe that somehow 12 million people can be driven away.
NEWS
By Janet Hook and Richard Simon and Janet Hook and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 14, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Triumphant Democrats returned to Capitol Hill yesterday to prepare for the transfer of power in Congress, but their postelection emphasis on unity quickly dissolved into power struggles and jockeying over the spoils of victory. Much of the squabbling stemmed from the decision over the weekend by Rep. Nancy Pelosi, who is likely to become House speaker, to endorse a longtime loyalist to be her second in command. Hoyer spurned In backing Rep. John P. Murtha of Pennsylvania, a strong critic of the Iraq war, for the post, Pelosi turned her back on Rep. Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland, who is favored by many of her party's more moderate members.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | November 18, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, a Baltimore Democrat, was chosen yesterday to help lead the delicate job of transferring power in the House to the Republicans after four decades of Democratic control.Mr. Cardin will chair a team of seven Democrats who will work with Republicans to ensure that they soon have the files and other information they will need to run the House.Mr. Cardin's committee is also expected to deal with such thorny issues as a possible Republican-ordered reorganization of the House and the divvying up of limited staff and office space.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 8, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Taking command of an election-year gambit, Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin of Baltimore will soon launch a series of Democratic hearings to accuse House Republicans of abusing their investigative powers by spending at least $13 million on investigations of President Clinton and his allies.As early as next week, House Democrats will release a preliminary study of the costs of 45 separate investigations conducted by 12 of the House's 20 committees.Cardin, who runs the House Democratic Caucus' Committee on Organization, Study and Review, plans to launch public meetings of his committee within weeks.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 25, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Kweisi Mfume describes himself these days as "a glorified spin doctor" for the Democratic Party.Which doesn't mean he dislikes his new extracurricular job as vice chairman for communication of the House Democratic Caucus.When he got it, after the rout of the Democratic Party at the polls in November, the job put the Baltimore congressman within his party's expanded leadership structure for the first time.Not too many people are surprised. Before the election Mr. Mfume was one of the more visible members of the House.
NEWS
By Noam N. Levey and Noam N. Levey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 25, 2007
WASHINGTON -- As congressional Democrats move to force President Bush to veto a war spending bill that would start a withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq, they are simultaneously pursuing a carefully crafted offensive aimed at another target: Republican lawmakers. In the charged debate over the war, the strategy aims to achieve Democratic objectives on both policy and political fronts, according to party leaders and aides. Convinced that Bush will never listen to their calls to bring troops home, senior Democrats have concluded that they must force Republicans to vote again and again in defense of the unpopular war until enough plead with the president to change course.
NEWS
By Janet Hook and Richard Simon and Janet Hook and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 14, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Triumphant Democrats returned to Capitol Hill yesterday to prepare for the transfer of power in Congress, but their postelection emphasis on unity quickly dissolved into power struggles and jockeying over the spoils of victory. Much of the squabbling stemmed from the decision over the weekend by Rep. Nancy Pelosi, who is likely to become House speaker, to endorse a longtime loyalist to be her second in command. Hoyer spurned In backing Rep. John P. Murtha of Pennsylvania, a strong critic of the Iraq war, for the post, Pelosi turned her back on Rep. Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland, who is favored by many of her party's more moderate members.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 4, 1998
WASHINGTON -- On a day when Democrats scored remarkable victories elsewhere, Republicans apparently clung to their hold on the House, beating a Democratic wave but failing to follow a long-standing trend that hands the president's party major losses in off-year elections.True to form for a campaign season that has defied predictions, the strongest pattern that seemed to emerge as Americans went to the polls was the least expected. Republicans failed to take seats they had strongly targeted, but Democrats fell short of their expectations as well.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 8, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Taking command of an election-year gambit, Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin of Baltimore will soon launch a series of Democratic hearings to accuse House Republicans of abusing their investigative powers by spending at least $13 million on investigations of President Clinton and his allies.As early as next week, House Democrats will release a preliminary study of the costs of 45 separate investigations conducted by 12 of the House's 20 committees.Cardin, who runs the House Democratic Caucus' Committee on Organization, Study and Review, plans to launch public meetings of his committee within weeks.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton sent his long-awaited fast-track trade bill on to Congress yesterday, but it received a lukewarm reception that suggests the White House faces an uphill battle to secure House and Senate approval.The legislation is designed to open the way for a broad array of trade negotiations, including expansion of the controversial North American Free Trade Agreement to Chile, by guaranteeing that Congress will not seek to unravel any new trade agreements the White House hammers out.However, in a bow to the Republicans who control Congress, Clinton rejected demands by unions and conservation groups that any new agreement contain tough labor and environmental standards as part of the basic trade accords -- and thus enforceable through U.S. trade sanctions.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 25, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Kweisi Mfume describes himself these days as "a glorified spin doctor" for the Democratic Party.Which doesn't mean he dislikes his new extracurricular job as vice chairman for communication of the House Democratic Caucus.When he got it, after the rout of the Democratic Party at the polls in November, the job put the Baltimore congressman within his party's expanded leadership structure for the first time.Not too many people are surprised. Before the election Mr. Mfume was one of the more visible members of the House.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | February 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Buoyed by overnight polls showing overwhelming support for President Clinton's economic plan, congressional Democrats began yesterday what is likely to be a marathon struggle to put aside their individual complaints to get something passed.Mr. Clinton apparently served his own cause well with an address Wednesday night that at least yesterday turned the tide of phone calls and polls in his favor.But as more details become known of the president's ambitious plan to increase taxes and cut spending, lawmakers expect that Mr. Clinton's sales job will get a whole lot tougher.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 4, 1998
WASHINGTON -- On a day when Democrats scored remarkable victories elsewhere, Republicans apparently clung to their hold on the House, beating a Democratic wave but failing to follow a long-standing trend that hands the president's party major losses in off-year elections.True to form for a campaign season that has defied predictions, the strongest pattern that seemed to emerge as Americans went to the polls was the least expected. Republicans failed to take seats they had strongly targeted, but Democrats fell short of their expectations as well.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | November 18, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, a Baltimore Democrat, was chosen yesterday to help lead the delicate job of transferring power in the House to the Republicans after four decades of Democratic control.Mr. Cardin will chair a team of seven Democrats who will work with Republicans to ensure that they soon have the files and other information they will need to run the House.Mr. Cardin's committee is also expected to deal with such thorny issues as a possible Republican-ordered reorganization of the House and the divvying up of limited staff and office space.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives was on the verge early today of resurrecting the $30 billion crime bill, after round-the-clock bipartisan negotiations and extra prodding from President Clinton.The effort hit an eleventh-hour snag, however, when Rep. Bill Brewster, an Oklahoma Democrat, angered at President Clinton's attacks on the gun lobby, offered a scaled-back substitute without a ban on assault weapons or any money for crime prevention programs. The substitute threatened to draw away precious votes.
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