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By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Staff Writer | January 3, 1993
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- Thomas F. "Mack" McLarty is such a down-to-earth guy he doesn't even like to fly.About to assume a job where he'll undoubtedly find himself above the clouds from time to time, he's already thought about how he'll handle the helicopter rides to and from the White House lawn should he need to accompany the president on such trips."
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By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonough visited the Baltimore regional office of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs on Friday to discuss efforts to address the agency's persistent backlog of veterans disability claims. The Baltimore office, which serves half a million veterans in Maryland, is among the nation's worst performers in processing claims, The Baltimore Sun has shown in a series of stories. McDonough's visit was not announced and was not open to reporters. McDonough met with managers in the office as well as employees who handle the claims processing.
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NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | April 25, 1991
Washington -- PERHAPS THE most preposterous aspect of John Sununu's frequent flying on military jets, beyond the man's celebrated arrogance demonstrated anew, is the notion that a White House chief of staff requires such special treatment.The job, after all, is not the presidency, although many lost sight RTC of that fact with some reason during the eight-year tenure of Ronald Reagan. First James Baker, then Donald Regan and Howard Baker all played inordinate roles in directing the affairs of government under a president who was only too happy to leave details to them.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
Baltimore Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano met last month with an influential state lawmaker to discuss more than $8 million in unpaid court-ordered judgments against the city's housing authority, which have resulted from lead-paint poisoning lawsuits brought by former public housing residents. But Del. Samuel I. “Sandy” Rosenberg said Graziano did not cover new ground at the June 5 meeting. “There was nothing new that I was told,” said Rosenberg, a Baltimore Democrat who is vice chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee.
NEWS
December 5, 1991
Despite caterwauling from the right, even conservative ideologues will not miss John H. Sununu. As White House chief of staff, he did all that could have been expected to serve their social agenda. Especially on abortion, the environment and affirmative action, he was unbending and did much to keep President Bush in line. But Mr. Sununu committed the sin of deviating from the economic agenda of the Reaganite supply-siders in putting together a 1990 budget agreement that abandoned the Bush campaign pledge of "no new taxes."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 31, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Justice Department officials said yesterday that they would await a White House ethics review before deciding whether to open a criminal investigation of a former administration aide who had acted as a representative of a primary figure in criminal inquiries into the Bank of Credit and Commerce International.On Tuesday Edward M. Rogers Jr., the former aide to White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu, canceled a $600,000 contract to represent Sheik Kamal Adham, former head of Saudi Arabian intelligence.
NEWS
March 4, 1994
Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Roger Altman, who is also acting director of the Resolution Trust Corporation, has recused himself from the RTC investigation into Madison Guaranty S&L. Why? Because he had to. The day before he acted it came out in a Senate committee hearing that in early February he had briefed White House staff members, including the White House chief counsel and Mrs. Clinton's chief of staff, on the course of the investigation. That was highly inappropriate. The RTC is an independent agency -- not part of the administration -- and the Madison Guaranty investigation involves charges that relate to President Clinton and Mrs. Clinton.
NEWS
By Daily Herald (Columbia, Tenn.) | December 3, 1991
LET'S STOP kidding ourselves. The problem is not President Bush's schedule of foreign travel.The real problem is that, whether he is at home or abroad, Bush has delegated the responsibility for domestic policy to people who have proved to be either too passive or actively obstructionist.For example, White House chief of staff John Sununu successfully worked to block bipartisan agreement on a new civil rights bill for several months. He has led the administration effort to override overwhelming congressional sentiment to extend jobless benefits to millions of Americans whose lives have been disrupted by the recession.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | August 11, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Behind the appointment of former House Majority Whip Tony Coelho as an unpaid "senior adviser" to the Democratic National Committee (DNC) is a White House desire, according to party insiders, to "vet" Coelho publicly in anticipation of putting him in charge of President Clinton's 1996 re-election campaign.For some time now, Coelho has acted as an unofficial political adviser to the Clinton White House, getting high marks as a savvy and politically astute operative. Before his friend Leon Panetta got the job of White House chief of staff, there was speculation that Coelho might be tapped for it.The problem, these insiders say, is the circumstance under which Coelho left Congress in 1989, retiring amid allegations of using political influence for personal profit, which he steadfastly denied, and about which a Justice Department investigation was conducted and later dropped.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 17, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Seven weeks after the White House said he would be reassigned for his role in the misuse of a Marine Corps helicopter, the head of the White House military office has not been disciplined and remains on the job, administration officials say.They said Friday that the White House had found it difficult to find a successor to the official, retired Col. Alphonso Maldon Jr., and that some thought had been given to letting him stay in his post.Colonel...
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
Baltimore Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano defended the city's public housing authority Friday, a day after a U.S. senator began an inquiry into what he termed "a wide range of allegations, including possible conflicts of interest, fraud, waste and abuse of taxpayers' monies. " Graziano said in a statement that "there have been a number of unfair accusations made against" the Housing Authority of Baltimore City. "We are confident that there has been no wrongdoing," he said. Sen. Charles E. Grassley of Iowa, the Judiciary Committee's ranking Republican and one of the Senate's most active watchdogs, sent a letter Thursday to federal Housing Secretary Shaun S. Donovan requesting reams of documents.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2011
Paul T. Graziano looked for all the world like a short-timer. Just weeks into his new job as Baltimore's housing commissioner, he was arrested at a Fells Point bar after a drunken tirade laced with anti-gay slurs. That was more than 10 years ago. He's still in the job. Now on his third mayor, he has outlasted three police commissioners and numerous agency heads to become the city's longest-serving housing chief. It's a powerful perch. He oversees not only public housing, but everything from the rebirth of onetime slums such as the Uplands apartments in West Baltimore to code enforcement complaints in wealthy areas like Roland Park.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | December 29, 2007
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals rejected yesterday the state's attempt to prevent questioning of a key witness in a Republican-led lawsuit seeking to invalidate new tax and spending laws. The order clears the way for the deposition of House of Delegates Chief Clerk Mary Monahan. Her deposition was scheduled for two days ago in Tampa, Fla., but was halted Wednesday by the appeals court while it considered the objections of the attorney general's office. "Now we get to find out what the attorney general of Maryland does not want you to know," said attorney Irwin R. Kramer.
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and Siobhan Gorman,Sun reporter | October 24, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee called on the Bush administration yesterday to delay the planned launch of a multi- billion-dollar cybersecurity initiative so that Congress could have time to evaluate it. Rep. Bennie Thompson said he wants to make sure the new program is legal before it is launched. In an interview, the Mississippi Democrat said he had been told that President Bush might unveil the initiative as early as next week. Known internally as the "Cyber Initiative," the program is designed to use the spying capabilities of the National Security Agency and other agencies to protect government and private communications networks from infiltration by terrorists and hackers.
NEWS
By Peter Wallsten and Janet Hook and Peter Wallsten and Janet Hook,Los Angeles Times | March 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Conservatives often ridicule Democrats for espousing the "culture of Hollywood." But in the latest sign of Republican discontent with the field of 2008 presidential hopefuls - and in a familiar plot twist - some of those same activists are eyeing a movie actor as the party's potential savior. Fred Thompson, the former senator from Tennessee who once played a White House chief of staff on the big screen and appears now as a politically savvy prosecutor on TV's Law & Order, is positioning himself to answer the call - and perhaps follow the script that saw Ronald Reagan jump from Hollywood to the White House.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | February 27, 2007
Hoping to quell a spate of shootings that wounded four teenagers in less than a week, Anne Arundel County and Annapolis officials vowed yesterday to employ a "full-court press" in one of the city's 10 public housing neighborhoods - but no one representing public housing was involved in the initial talks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Tony Snow, the Fox News radio and television commentator, has agreed to become the White House press secretary, and could be named to the post as early as today, administration officials said yesterday. Unlike the soft-spoken current White House press secretary, Scott McClellan, who announced his resignation last week, Snow is something of a showman. Snow has even written recent columns critical of Bush, arguing that the White House had lost its verve and direction during his second term.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 14, 1990
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's surprise pick to chair the Republican Party, William J. Bennett, unexpectedly backed out of the job yesterday, apparently after concluding that he had been lured into a post where his influence would be severely limited.His decision was a major embarrassment to Mr. Bush and to an already badly split Republican Party. It also was a potentially serious blow to White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu, who had pushed the former "drug czar" to take the position.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | December 13, 2006
In his boldest move so far, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman announced yesterday that he's replaced the county's two top housing officials with his own choices. The firing of 15-year housing director Leonard S. Vaughan, 66, and 10-year deputy director Neil Gaffney, 60, mark Ulman's first moves to replace veteran county officials. Stacy Spann, 33, of Fulton, an assistant commissioner in Baltimore's housing agency since March 2004, who rose from his teen years as a resident of Howard's Guilford Gardens public housing to live in Maple Lawn, will take over Howard's agency Jan. 15, Ulman said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Tony Snow, the Fox News radio and television commentator, has agreed to become the White House press secretary, and could be named to the post as early as today, administration officials said yesterday. Unlike the soft-spoken current White House press secretary, Scott McClellan, who announced his resignation last week, Snow is something of a showman. Snow has even written recent columns critical of Bush, arguing that the White House had lost its verve and direction during his second term.
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