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NEWS
By RICHARD SIMON and RICHARD SIMON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 18, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Congressional Budget Office revised its estimates of the federal deficit yesterday, predicting that it would shrink to $260 billion in the current fiscal year - lower than previously projected - but rise to $286 billion in fiscal 2007, which begins Oct. 1. The new figures are stoking a partisan debate over fiscal responsibility as the midterm elections approach. Republicans cheered the prospect of a third straight year of decline in the deficit as evidence that the economy is benefiting from GOP-sponsored tax cuts.
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NEWS
April 11, 2014
The marvel of Rep. Paul Ryan's budget, which the House of Representatives approved this week, is that for a piece of legislation that's essentially dead on arrival in the Senate, it's going to live on as a political document from now until November. That was the point, of course, but it seems more likely that Republicans will regret its passage than Democrats. Conventional wisdom in Washington is that the GOP has the upper hand in the midterm elections, and polls seem to bear that out. As recently as a few weeks ago, statistical wunderkind Nate Silver viewed Republicans as being the slight favorites to wrest control of the U.S. Senate from the Democrats this year.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | November 6, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The big budget deal President Bush just signed, the one that's supposed to cut the deficit by nearly $500 billion over five years, won't cut federal spending at all this fiscal year.In fact, total federal spending will rise by about 10 percent. And that's without an additional $75 billion more for the savings and loan bailout and the Persian Gulf military expedition.The deal -- which Bush and Congress struggled for six months to produce, promoting widespread public disgust in the process -- promises that one-third of future deficit reduction will come from tax increases and two-thirds from spending cuts.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
WASHINGTON -- A video of Montgomery County Democratic Rep. Chris Van Hollen battling with House Republicans over legislation to reopen government agencies has gone viral -- picking up 1.7 million views in recent days -- as lawmakers continue to wrestle over a deal to end the weeks long budget impasse. The exchange between Van Hollen and Rep. Jason Chaffetz, a Utah Republican who was presiding over the chamber at the time, centers on an obscure rule change that prohibited Democrats from bringing a "clean," policy-free bill to the House floor to end the government shutdown.
NEWS
By New Orleans Times-Picayune | February 20, 1992
BIG CITIES and small towns alike across the country are beset by many of the same problems: deteriorating infrastructures, crime, weak to dying economies.All of the candidates, including President Bush, talk about the need to create "jobs, jobs, jobs" in general terms. But little is said specifically about the need to revitalize the economies of the cities and small towns.Enter the nation's mayors. They have a plan they say would create 280,500 jobs this year and help lift the nation out of recession.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | May 13, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A constitutional amendment that would force the federal government to spend within its means would be impractical and irresponsible or painful and necessary -- depending on which member of Congress you believe.Lawmakers wielded charts and statistics yesterday -- even spoke of their children's economic future -- during competing arguments about the wisdom of a balanced budget amendment.Congress is expected to vote next month on such an amendment, in the face of a $400 billion deficit, with Democratic leaders predicting it will be approved and then sent to the states for ratification.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In another sharp blow to the aerospace industry, NASA and its contractors stand to lose at least 40,000 jobs nationwide under severe new budget cuts approved by the House.The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was scheduled to disclose today that it will eliminate about 20,000 jobs, but the Republican-led funding cuts would roughly double the size of the reductions planned by NASA over the past half year.The size of the additional cuts caught NASA officials by surprise when they were revealed by the House Budget Committee a week ago. The first assessment of the potential impact on space agency programs, which employ roughly 100,000 people nationwide, came in an internal NASA memo obtained by the Los Angeles Times.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
WASHINGTON -- A video of Montgomery County Democratic Rep. Chris Van Hollen battling with House Republicans over legislation to reopen government agencies has gone viral -- picking up 1.7 million views in recent days -- as lawmakers continue to wrestle over a deal to end the weeks long budget impasse. The exchange between Van Hollen and Rep. Jason Chaffetz, a Utah Republican who was presiding over the chamber at the time, centers on an obscure rule change that prohibited Democrats from bringing a "clean," policy-free bill to the House floor to end the government shutdown.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The House buried President Bush's new budget yesterday and adopted instead a $1.46 trillion Democratic plan that avoids tax increases while allocating more spending for education, housing, veterans' benefits and a variety of other social programs.Mr. Bush's proposal -- which included a $25 billion reduction in Medicare outlays over five years and an $11 billion cut in capital gains taxes primarily for wealthy Americans -- was crushed by a vote of 335-89. Eighty-eight Republicans backed the president, but 75 members of his own party deserted him on the roll call.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In an election-year bow to older Americans, Democratic and Republican leaders in the House have decided to act quickly today on legislation that would double the amount Social Security recipients between the ages of 65 and 69 may earn without losing benefits.The politically popular bill would increase the Social Security earnings test from the present $10,200 a year to $20,000 in 1997, allowing beneficiaries to receive up to that amount in wages or salary without penalty.It also would provide increased benefits to widows or widowers who are now over 80 but were under the normal retirement age of 65 when their spouses died.
NEWS
By Christopher Van Hollen Jr | July 25, 2011
Congress is engaged in an ongoing debate on proposals to reduce the deficit. There is no question we need get our fiscal house in order and put our nation on the path to long-term fiscal stability - the question is how. First, we must ensure that we do no harm to our still fragile economy - anything that would put American jobs at risk is unacceptable. Second, we must find a balanced approach that does not put undue burdens on our seniors and most vulnerable or slash critical investments in education, infrastructure and innovation.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2011
Last year, Rep. Chris Van Hollen had the unenviable job of leading the House Democratic campaign operation through the party's worst election since 1938. These days, as the top-ranking Democrat on the House Budget Committee, the Montgomery County lawmaker is engrossed in what might qualify as an even more daunting challenge: defending Democratic spending priorities at time when the party has its smallest minority in decades. Republicans regained the House majority on promises to rein in spiraling federal budget deficits.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2011
The House of Delegates gave initial approval Wednesday for a $14.6 billion state spending plan that closes a yawning deficit without raising taxes but would have Marylanders paying tens of millions more in extra fees. The plan would put a stronger emphasis on education than Gov. Martin O'Malley's initial proposal by restoring nearly $60 million the governor chopped from schools. And it is slightly more generous to localities in aid for road maintenance and other funding. But the plan could mean higher bus and train fares, as well as increasing fees for titling cars, using vanity license plates, recording property and registering birth records.
NEWS
By Joel Havemann and Joel Havemann,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 25, 2007
WASHINGTON -- President Bush can balance the budget within five years, or he can get Congress to extend his tax cuts beyond their scheduled expiration, the Congressional Budget Office reported yesterday - but probably not both. Bush has said otherwise, committing himself in Tuesday's State of the Union address, as he did earlier this month, to providing Congress on Feb. 5 with spending and tax proposals for fiscal year 2008 that would put the budget on a path toward balance by 2012. "We must balance the federal budget," Bush said Tuesday night.
NEWS
By RICHARD SIMON and RICHARD SIMON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 18, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Congressional Budget Office revised its estimates of the federal deficit yesterday, predicting that it would shrink to $260 billion in the current fiscal year - lower than previously projected - but rise to $286 billion in fiscal 2007, which begins Oct. 1. The new figures are stoking a partisan debate over fiscal responsibility as the midterm elections approach. Republicans cheered the prospect of a third straight year of decline in the deficit as evidence that the economy is benefiting from GOP-sponsored tax cuts.
TOPIC
February 27, 2005
LOOKING FORWARD Monday President Bush probably will get an earful at the National Governors Association's winter meeting in Washington. Topics are certain to include the mounting costs to states of the federal Medicare and Medicaid programs and Bush's budget for the coming fiscal year, which cuts an array of state aid programs, from education assistance to funding for job training. Black farmers who claim they suffered racial discrimination in being denied federal loans will testify before a U.S. House subcommittee in Cincinnati on problems in a settlement they reached with the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
September 27, 1995
FOR A GLIMPSE of Congress at work, take a quick hard look at the $243 billion defense appropriations bill just approved by Senate and House conferees. The measure, richly deserving a presidential veto, contains two big-ticket items that cause fiscal indigestion not only among Democratic liberals but among Republican deficit hawks intent on balancing the budget.Before conferees assembled a few weeks ago, the Senate had gone on record against added funds for the B-2 bomber and the House had voted to reject a third Seawolf nuclear submarine.
NEWS
May 6, 1997
WHAT DOES it take for pols on the Potomac to come up with a balanced budget agreement? Just a mere $225 billion windfall conjured up by number-crunchers at the Congressional Budget Office. This correction of a previous "mistake" allowed negotiators to give the Democrats just enough extra spending money and Republicans just enough in tax breaks to insure easy passage in Congress for an easy deal.What will it take to get genuine reform of Social Security and Medicare before these popular entitlement programs break the budget?
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 9, 2004
WASHINGTON - U.S. economic growth is picking up after hitting a "soft patch" this year and oil prices aren't causing inflation to accelerate, Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan told a congressional committee yesterday. But the growth may not compensate for federal deficits that are "troubling" over time, he said. "The most recent data suggest that, on the whole, the expansion has regained some traction," Greenspan said in prepared testimony to the House Budget Committee. "Despite the rise in oil prices through mid-August, inflation and inflation expectations have eased in recent months."
NEWS
By Mary Curtius and Mary Curtius,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - The House Budget Committee approved yesterday a $2.4 trillion budget for the 2005 fiscal year and separate legislation that would impose caps on spending, in each case voting along party lines - 24 Republicans in favor and 19 Democrats opposed. The budget bill is scheduled for consideration by the full House on Wednesday. The panel's actions set the stage for what will probably be contentious negotiations between the House and the Senate, both controlled by Republicans, to reconcile differences in their 2005 budget bills.
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