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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2000
Elizabeth Gordon Norcross, a former editor-in-chief of House Beautiful and proponent of the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, died Sunday of pneumonia at Frederick Memorial Hospital. She was 94 and lived in Adamstown. Mrs. Norcross began her career in journalism writing home maintenance and how-to-columns for the Chicago Tribune and the New York Herald-Tribune during the 1920s. She was the author of "More House for Your Money" and, after working in the promotion department for Good Housekeeping, took over as editor of House Beautiful in 1941, a position she held until retiring in 1964.
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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2005
Tamila Aliyeva has won a Howard County hearing examiner's approval for a home beauty parlor that was vigorously opposed by dozens of residents in her Centennial neighborhood in Ellicott City. "I'm so happy. I'm very happy," she said. "I think it is the right decision." She said she would now move to open, despite the possibility of an appeal. Thomas P. Carbo, the examiner, issued a 10-page decision yesterday brushing aside opposition arguments that Aliyeva's small business in the 9800 block of Gwynn Park Drive would be incompatible and could cause traffic or environmental problems.
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FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | August 18, 1991
House Beautiful isn't the same old house anymore. It's got a new look and a new philosophy beginning with the September issue, which arrived at newstands just a few days ago.The magazine, long a bastion of the upscale but cozy country look, has edged a little closer to HG and Elle Decor."
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | August 29, 2004
When I read shelter magazines such as Elle Decor or House Beautiful -- as I have, avidly, for years -- I always experience a warm glow of appreciation for the domestic creativity of my fellow human beings. How happy it makes me to see the splendid way some folks live. Ha! Believe that, and perhaps you'll come visit my maisonette on Mars. No, indeed. I'm ashamed to admit that gliding my eyes across photographs of faultlessly appointed rooms sometimes fills me with a toxic mixture of envy and self-recrimination.
FEATURES
By Sharon Overton and Sharon Overton,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | June 2, 1996
First, let's get the JFK Jr. question out of the way.No, Victoria Hagan did not decorate his apartment -- even though her husband is Kennedy's business partner in the much-publicized new political magazine, George. Kennedy didn't hire anyone to do his decorating, Hagan says. "He did his own. He's got great taste."Furthermore, don't expect any other tell-all celebrity decorating tales from this up-and-coming young designer. Her dreamy, white-washed rooms appear often on the pages of Architectural Digest, House Beautiful, Metropolitan Home and Vogue, but she isn't into dishing on her clients.
FEATURES
By Jill L. Kubatko | March 8, 1992
Something old, something new -- MontrachetHere's a twist. If you can't afford to buy something old, you can always buy something new. A line of new furniture purposely designed to look like hand-me-downs from Aunt Sally's attic or Grandma's barn is arriving at the Towson Thomasville Galleries later this month.The line, called Montrachet, after a region in south central France, includes antique-looking furniture with details such as hand-painted, hand-rubbed finishes and old-fashioned planked tops.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | December 23, 1990
Home is where the heart is, to be sure. But home may also be where the money is these days, as Americans put away their dancing shoes and come back home again.At least, that is what publishers of the elite home-design magazines are betting on. These sumptuous publications, which are to home decorating what haute couture is to sewing, include Knapp Communication's Architectural Digest, standard-bearer of the category; Conde Nast's HG, known until two years ago as House & Garden; Hearst's House Beautiful, granddaddy of them all at 94 years old; Meredith's Metropolitan Home; and Hachette's stylish newcomer, Elle Decor.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | September 17, 1995
Maryland scores with show housesWhat a coup. Of 1995's 10 most beautiful show house rooms featured in the October House Beautiful, three are from Maryland. Closest to home is the blue-and-ivory dining room designed by John Andersson and Ginny Burns for Papier Interiors at the Baltimore Symphony Decorators' Show House. (The two designers have since left Papier to start their own firm, ++ Coppermine Terrace Interiors, with third partner Anne Gurbel.)In late spring, designer Carey Reid Kirk created a stunning outdoor living room on the porch of the Southern Maryland Decorators' Show House in St. Mary's County.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | July 24, 1994
People still have a soft spot for velvet"Velvet's in vogue," according to Style Beat in the August House Beautiful. That startled us -- we (and everyone else) have been writing about the pared down, simplified '90s. We decided to consult the experts.Ruth Clark of Pearson, the upholstery division of Lane, doesn't see a hot trend but says cautiously that yes, people are beginning to look at velvets again. "For the past three years we've introduced one or two per market," she says, "especially because of all the tapestries that have been so successful for us. They work together."
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1996
Flowers and moreFoxglove, which has opened in Mount Vernon where Morton's gourmet shop used to be, is much more than a florist's. Owner Kelly Jenkins (above) combines cut flowers, dried arrangements and topiaries with an array of gifts and home furnishings. You'll find an exclusive line of primitive painted Mexican furniture, pottery, hand-dipped candles and the work of local artists like Alan Harris, who makes stunning lamps out of parchment paper, silk cording and copper wire.Foxglove (10 W. Eager St., [410]
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2000
Elizabeth Gordon Norcross, a former editor-in-chief of House Beautiful and proponent of the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, died Sunday of pneumonia at Frederick Memorial Hospital. She was 94 and lived in Adamstown. Mrs. Norcross began her career in journalism writing home maintenance and how-to-columns for the Chicago Tribune and the New York Herald-Tribune during the 1920s. She was the author of "More House for Your Money" and, after working in the promotion department for Good Housekeeping, took over as editor of House Beautiful in 1941, a position she held until retiring in 1964.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | January 31, 1999
NEW YORK -- Interior designer Christopher Coleman has made it big here by thinking small. The 36-year-old Lutherville native has taken minuscule rooms in some of the country's best-known decorator showhouses, turned them into whimsical showpieces and received national attention for his designs.His inventive solutions in his own small (375 square feet) studio apartment earned him a spread in last November's House Beautiful and the magazine's nomination as one of 14 "future hall of famers" in the decorating world.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1996
Flowers and moreFoxglove, which has opened in Mount Vernon where Morton's gourmet shop used to be, is much more than a florist's. Owner Kelly Jenkins (above) combines cut flowers, dried arrangements and topiaries with an array of gifts and home furnishings. You'll find an exclusive line of primitive painted Mexican furniture, pottery, hand-dipped candles and the work of local artists like Alan Harris, who makes stunning lamps out of parchment paper, silk cording and copper wire.Foxglove (10 W. Eager St., [410]
FEATURES
By Sharon Overton and Sharon Overton,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | June 2, 1996
First, let's get the JFK Jr. question out of the way.No, Victoria Hagan did not decorate his apartment -- even though her husband is Kennedy's business partner in the much-publicized new political magazine, George. Kennedy didn't hire anyone to do his decorating, Hagan says. "He did his own. He's got great taste."Furthermore, don't expect any other tell-all celebrity decorating tales from this up-and-coming young designer. Her dreamy, white-washed rooms appear often on the pages of Architectural Digest, House Beautiful, Metropolitan Home and Vogue, but she isn't into dishing on her clients.
FEATURES
By LAURA BARNHARDT | September 24, 1995
"When we got back from our honeymoon, we didn't have to sleep on the floor exactly. But our living room was totally empty."The recollection of Silver Spring newlywed Heidi Ingram, 22, describes a situation that many young married couples confront.With wedding plans so all-consuming, details such as decorating a first home together often don't get attended to until after the honeymoon.To help prospective brides and grooms get a head start on designing their new home, we asked decorating pros for some tips on making the job easier.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | September 17, 1995
Maryland scores with show housesWhat a coup. Of 1995's 10 most beautiful show house rooms featured in the October House Beautiful, three are from Maryland. Closest to home is the blue-and-ivory dining room designed by John Andersson and Ginny Burns for Papier Interiors at the Baltimore Symphony Decorators' Show House. (The two designers have since left Papier to start their own firm, ++ Coppermine Terrace Interiors, with third partner Anne Gurbel.)In late spring, designer Carey Reid Kirk created a stunning outdoor living room on the porch of the Southern Maryland Decorators' Show House in St. Mary's County.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | August 29, 2004
When I read shelter magazines such as Elle Decor or House Beautiful -- as I have, avidly, for years -- I always experience a warm glow of appreciation for the domestic creativity of my fellow human beings. How happy it makes me to see the splendid way some folks live. Ha! Believe that, and perhaps you'll come visit my maisonette on Mars. No, indeed. I'm ashamed to admit that gliding my eyes across photographs of faultlessly appointed rooms sometimes fills me with a toxic mixture of envy and self-recrimination.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | January 31, 1999
NEW YORK -- Interior designer Christopher Coleman has made it big here by thinking small. The 36-year-old Lutherville native has taken minuscule rooms in some of the country's best-known decorator showhouses, turned them into whimsical showpieces and received national attention for his designs.His inventive solutions in his own small (375 square feet) studio apartment earned him a spread in last November's House Beautiful and the magazine's nomination as one of 14 "future hall of famers" in the decorating world.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | July 24, 1994
People still have a soft spot for velvet"Velvet's in vogue," according to Style Beat in the August House Beautiful. That startled us -- we (and everyone else) have been writing about the pared down, simplified '90s. We decided to consult the experts.Ruth Clark of Pearson, the upholstery division of Lane, doesn't see a hot trend but says cautiously that yes, people are beginning to look at velvets again. "For the past three years we've introduced one or two per market," she says, "especially because of all the tapestries that have been so successful for us. They work together."
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | July 22, 1993
Mark Schlossberg is building his dream home in Glenelg.From the fire's light reflecting off the Italian marble to the sunlight shining through the bent-glass corner window, every room of the 3,000-square-foot house has something to pique a visitor's interest.Vaulted ceilings under three large gables are broken up by skylights that open and close electrically. Even the blinds are remote-controlled. In case someone forgets to flick the switch to close the skylights when it rains, a rain sensor does the job for them.
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