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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 18, 1993
(TC WASHINGTON -- Former House Sergeant-at-Arms Jack Russ, a powerful Capitol Hill figure who once ran the scandal-scarred House bank, was sentenced yesterday to two years in prison for embezzlement, fraud and filing a false report.U.S. District Judge Stanley Harris also ordered Russ, 48, to pay ++ $445,000 to investors he bilked and perform 250 hours of community service after his guilty plea to three felony counts last October.Russ, who once counted senior members of Congress among his closest friends, was alone with his lawyer in the courtroom when sentence was pronounced.
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NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | March 3, 2006
The bank that incorporates "Annapolis" as part of its name is preparing to establish its first branch in the city limits, having reached a deal to occupy a part of the yet-to-be-reopened Market House near City Dock. BankAnnapolis announced this week that it has agreed with Site Realty Group of Silver Spring, the lease owner of the 19th-century building, to be among Market House's new vendors. Site Realty and city officials are completing a renovation that has cost more than $1 million, and the city remains hopeful that the 5,000-square-foot facility will reopen by the end of April.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | March 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- One hundred House members bounced at least 45 checks at the House bank during the past three years, while another 133 lawmakers had five or fewer overdrafts, according to a House Ethics Committee report.The top abuser of the bank wrote 996 bad checks between July 1, 1988, and Oct. 3, 1991. That amounts to about one bad check per business day for more than three years.Even the official responsible for the bank, House Sergeant-at-Arms Jack Russ, bounced 19 checks drawn on other banks with a total value of $56,100.
NEWS
November 18, 2004
A CAUTIONARY TALE of the corrosive effects of holding too much power for too long can be found in the annals of the House of Representatives from the early 1990s, near the end of the Democrats' 40-year reign. Party leaders were caught in one scandal after another, from cashing rubber checks at the House Bank to laundering money through the House Post Office. Legislation was written in secret; potential beneficiaries were shaken down for campaign contributions. An attitude of arrogant remove permeated the place.
NEWS
By TRB | March 19, 1992
Washington. -- Don't you have anything better to worry about than the House Bank?One of the most entertaining things about the news is its arbitrariness. When is some story a huge outrage worthy of screaming headlines on Page One, and when does it deserve burial on page 23?Just lately, the rubber checks at the so-called House Bank have been getting the screaming Page One treatment. Two years ago, it was different.On Feb. 7, 1990, the General Accounting Office, the Congress' investigative arm, released a report on the House Bank.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service Joe Nawrozki contributed to this story | March 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Maryland Rep. Kweisi Mfume wrote 12 overdrafts on his account at the trouble-plagued House Bank.But he didn't write them to help lead the glamorous lifestyle often associated with some of Washington's more free-spending political figures, according to a news release issued by his office.Mr. Mfume, a 7th-District Democrat and member of the House Ethics Committee, found himself with egg on his face this month when he was informed by his own committee that he had made the 12 overdrafts during the 39 months under review.
NEWS
By Clifford Krauss and Clifford Krauss,New York Times News Service | April 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- With the Watergate scandal still hanging in the air, Stephen J. Solarz, Thomas J. Downey and a slew of freshman Democrats came to Congress 17 years ago to clean it up and turn it inside out.Now these one-time young reformers are senior members of the House, and many of them are finding that their careers are caught up in a new scandal of their own, the House bank affair.The story of the 26 remaining members of the freshman Class of1974 demonstrates that the institution can swallow up even the most reform-minded members.
NEWS
By Clifford Krauss and Clifford Krauss,New York Times News Service | April 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- With the Watergate scandal still hanging in the air, Stephen J. Solarz, Thomas J. Downey and a slew of freshman Democrats came to Congress 17 years ago to clean it up and turn it inside out.Now these one-time young reformers are senior members of the House, and many of them are finding that their careers are caught up in a new scandal of their own, the House bank affair.The story of the 26 remaining members of the freshman Class of1974 demonstrates that the institution can swallow up even the most reform-minded members.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Members of Congress are widely perceived by the public to be corrupt, pampered by unnecessary perquisites and arrogant about their power, the latest New York Times/CBS News Poll indicates.A striking 83 percent of American adults said they believe that the scores of legislators who overdrew their House bank accounts did so not by mistake but "because they knew they could get away with it," the poll found.Three people in five told poll-takers that basic privileges the lawmakers enjoy such as travel allowances, staff assistance and free mail are "unjustifiable."
NEWS
March 19, 1992
Now that three members of the Bush cabinet, including Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, have been sullied in the House Bank scandal, perhaps the partisan name-calling will stop and the blame will come to rest where it belongs -- on the leadership on both sides of the aisle. The scandal is bipartisan in its reach, which is just as well because it is Congress itself that is really on trial.Retribution has already started, where it should, at the hands of the voters. Rep. Charles Hayes, an Illinois Democrat with 716 overdrafts, was defeated in Tuesday's primary.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2001
Americans are looking close to home to ease the mountain of consumer debt they've racked up over the past decade. In fact, homeowners are treating their residences like piggy banks, turning them upside down and shaking out some of the equity locked inside. With home values on the rise and interest rates on home-equity lines of credit tied to a low prime rate, more consumers are using their houses as a way to pay off credit card debt, undertake home improvements, send children to college or buy big-ticket items.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 18, 1993
(TC WASHINGTON -- Former House Sergeant-at-Arms Jack Russ, a powerful Capitol Hill figure who once ran the scandal-scarred House bank, was sentenced yesterday to two years in prison for embezzlement, fraud and filing a false report.U.S. District Judge Stanley Harris also ordered Russ, 48, to pay ++ $445,000 to investors he bilked and perform 250 hours of community service after his guilty plea to three felony counts last October.Russ, who once counted senior members of Congress among his closest friends, was alone with his lawyer in the courtroom when sentence was pronounced.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | December 18, 1992
Rachel Spangle is learning the value of saving, a quarter at a time.She and 10 other sixth graders at Chesapeake Bay Middle School lined up yesterday morning in Christine DiCio's classroom to deposit their spare change in savings accounts provided by Farmers National Bank."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | October 23, 1992
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- The scandal-ridden House bank closed its doors on Capitol Hill last year, but its services are still being advertised throughout the farm country of southern Pennsylvania.Rep. Bill Goodling, whose 430 overdrafts worth $188,000 earned him a place among the worst abusers of the House bank, is plagued by hard-hitting TV spots that keep the notorious bank alive and could deny the conservative Republican a 10th term."Bill Goodling . . . is one of the nation's worst abusers in the check-bouncing scandal," says the announcer in an ad bought by independent candidate Tom Humbert, a former aide to U.S. Housing Secretary Jack F. Kemp.
NEWS
April 29, 1992
Last month, Attorney General William Barr announced that a special counsel would conduct a probe of the House of Representatives' bank. The statute establishing truly independent special counsels -- for example, Lawrence Walsh in the Iran-contra investigation -- does not apply to probes of congressional misdeeds. But even special counsels answerable to the attorney general, as is his choice in this case, Malcolm Wilkey, can be independent. Remember Archibald Cox? He was in that situation and pushed the Watergate investigation so far President Nixon ordered him fired.
NEWS
April 28, 1992
Last month, Attorney General William Barr announced that a special counsel would conduct a probe of the House of Representatives' bank. This removed the investigation from the control of Jay Stephens, the U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia. Mr. Stephens is well known for his sting, indictment and conviction of D.C. Mayor Marion Barry. Some critics of that operation thought Mr. Stephens, a Republican, may have been motivated in part by political considerations in going after the Democratic mayor.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | March 17, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Maryland Democratic Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, who has repeatedly denied that he wrote any bad checks at the House bank, yesterday revealed that he wrote four overdrafts during his 11 years in Congress.The congressman, who has been critical of his colleagues for abusing the now-closed bank, said he learned about his own overdrafts -- written in 1991 and 1986 -- on Friday, following a call from the House ethics committee. No notices were ever sent from the House bank about the overdrafts, he said.
NEWS
November 18, 2004
A CAUTIONARY TALE of the corrosive effects of holding too much power for too long can be found in the annals of the House of Representatives from the early 1990s, near the end of the Democrats' 40-year reign. Party leaders were caught in one scandal after another, from cashing rubber checks at the House Bank to laundering money through the House Post Office. Legislation was written in secret; potential beneficiaries were shaken down for campaign contributions. An attitude of arrogant remove permeated the place.
NEWS
By David Johnston and David Johnston,New York Times News Service | April 25, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In an action that could lead to yet another round of battles over the House bank, the Justice Department has subpoenaed all financial records of every House member's transactions there for a 39-month period from 1988 to 1991.The subpoenas were first disclosed in a letter that Speaker Thomas S. Foley of Washington state sent to his House colleagues yesterday.Mr. Foley did not indicate whether the House leadership would comply with the subpoenas, which were issued on Tuesday.But the speaker, disclosing a series of private meetings between House leaders and Justice Department officials, said he had rejected an informal request for most of the same records by Malcolm R. Wilkey, the special counsel who is conducting the department's preliminary criminal inquiry into the bank.
NEWS
By Clifford Krauss and Clifford Krauss,New York Times News Service | April 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- With the Watergate scandal still hanging in the air, Stephen J. Solarz, Thomas J. Downey and a slew of freshman Democrats came to Congress 17 years ago to clean it up and turn it inside out.Now these one-time young reformers are senior members of the House, and many of them are finding that their careers are caught up in a new scandal of their own, the House bank affair.The story of the 26 remaining members of the freshman Class of1974 demonstrates that the institution can swallow up even the most reform-minded members.
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