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NEWS
May 22, 2013
I have one very simple question for the ultra partisan, liberal Sun. Will you and the disingenuous Democrats still be demanding filibuster reform if the Republicans take control of the House and Senate in 2014 ("Tom Perez and the 'nuclear option,'" May 20). I doubt it, but I'm just askin'. Gail Householder, Marriottsville
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The General Assembly fulfilled its state constitutional duty Saturday by wrapping up action on Gov. Martin O'Malley's nearly $39 billion operating budget. Final approval came as the House and Senate approved the agreement rreached by negotiators for the two chambers. The legislature also ratified a deal on a companion measure that would provide $18.5 million to be available for the state's film tax credit -- considered critical in keeping the production of the Netflix television show House of Cards in Maryland.
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NEWS
March 4, 1991
The legislature did not meet yesterday, the 55th day of the 1991 session.TodayNoon: Senate Budget and Taxation subcommittee considers budgets of Mass Transit Administration, Motor Vehicle Administration, State Railroad Administration, Room 400, Senate Office Building.3 p.m.: House Appropriations Committee receives briefing on biotechnology investment and technology transfer issues in Maryland, Room 130, House Office Building.3:30 p.m.: Senate Budget and Taxation Committee considers Schaefer administration proposal to raise the tax on gasoline and various transportation fees, Room 100, Senate Office Building.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley's chief legislative priority to raise the minimum wage cleared another hurdle Friday as the Senate granted initial approval after a marathon debate. Lawmakers made 18 different attempts to redraft the proposal that incrementally raises pay for the state's lowest-earning workers from $7.25 to $10.10 by 2018. Republicans tried to carve out more exemptions to the hike, while Democrats tried to undo some concessions that got the proposal this far. No attempts were successful, and the Senate could pass the measure as soon as Saturday.
NEWS
April 27, 2012
Not one but two more special sessions of the Maryland General Assembly? And all because the state House and Senate wasted the regular session on trivial matters and expressions of ego. Neither the so-called governor nor his two minions in the legislature should draw a salary for the dog and pony show they exhibited this year. Maybe that would help defray the costs of this double-dipping. Even Doc Holliday said that his hypocrisy only went so far. F. Cordell, Lutherville
NEWS
October 1, 2013
There is an established way to make or change laws: A majority of the House and Senate agree and send their proposed legislation to the president. He then approves or vetoes it ("House sets vote on funding bill; agencies brace for shutdown," Sept. 29). The Republicans try to get around the established process by threatening to hurt lots of people if a certain law isn't changed. No voting, no legislative agreement, just threats. They are just a bunch of gangsters in neckties. William Akers, Baltimore
NEWS
January 28, 1991
The state Senate and the House of Delegates did not meet during the weekend, the 18th and 19th days of the General Assembly session.Today2 p.m.: Senate Budget and Taxation Committee receives briefing Maryland State Games audit, Room 100, Senate Office Building.5 p.m.: Senate Executive Nominations Committee reviews appointments made by Gov. William Donald Schaefer, including appointments to the University of Maryland Board of Regents, Room 200, Senate Office Building.8 p.m.: House and Senate convene, State House.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1999
Legislators would not be able to accept sports tickets or individual meals from State House lobbyists under an ethics reform bill passed by House and Senate committees yesterday.Under both versions of the legislation, lawmakers would also have to meet annually with the General Assembly's ethics adviser in an attempt to avoid ethical missteps.Meeting separately, the House Commerce and Government Matters Committee and the Senate Economic Environmental Affairs Committee approved the legislation amid grumbling from lawmakers that some of its provisions are unnecessary or cumbersome.
NEWS
February 17, 1997
William L. Scott,81, who represented Virginia in the U.S. House and Senate, died of a chest infection Friday in suburban Virginia. He had Alzheimer's disease.In 1972, after three terms in the House, Scott upset Democratic incumbent William B. Spong Jr., becoming the first Republican to win a Senate seat from Virginia since Reconstruction.He did not seek re-election and left the Senate in 1979.Oscar Adams Jr.,72, a former Alabama Supreme Court justice and the first black person elected to statewide office in Alabama, died Saturday of cancer in Birmingham.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The General Assembly fulfilled its state constitutional duty Saturday by wrapping up action on Gov. Martin O'Malley's nearly $39 billion operating budget. Final approval came as the House and Senate approved the agreement rreached by negotiators for the two chambers. The legislature also ratified a deal on a companion measure that would provide $18.5 million to be available for the state's film tax credit -- considered critical in keeping the production of the Netflix television show House of Cards in Maryland.
NEWS
April 3, 2014
The General Assembly session ends Monday, and already lawmakers have sent to Gov. Martin O'Malley's desk a number of important pieces of legislation, including a bill banning discrimination against transgender individuals, reforms to Baltimore's liquor board and new protections against domestic violence. But a few major issue remain to be decided during the next few days, including: •Minimum wage. The most important item on Governor O'Malley's agenda has gotten steadily watered down.
NEWS
October 14, 2013
With the government shutdown entering its third week and Thursday's deadline to raise the debt ceiling - and hold off potential default - now looming, negotiations appear to have entered a new phase of victim-hood. Apparently, it's not enough for the hostage-taking that started this mess to fail, Republicans fret that Democrats are now pressing their political advantage. At least that's the impression from some in the GOP who went to the airwaves in recent days to warn Democrats not to "get greedy" or "humiliate" their party.
NEWS
October 1, 2013
There is an established way to make or change laws: A majority of the House and Senate agree and send their proposed legislation to the president. He then approves or vetoes it ("House sets vote on funding bill; agencies brace for shutdown," Sept. 29). The Republicans try to get around the established process by threatening to hurt lots of people if a certain law isn't changed. No voting, no legislative agreement, just threats. They are just a bunch of gangsters in neckties. William Akers, Baltimore
NEWS
May 22, 2013
I have one very simple question for the ultra partisan, liberal Sun. Will you and the disingenuous Democrats still be demanding filibuster reform if the Republicans take control of the House and Senate in 2014 ("Tom Perez and the 'nuclear option,'" May 20). I doubt it, but I'm just askin'. Gail Householder, Marriottsville
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
After beating back a series of challenges in the House of Delegates, lawmakers are poised to give final approval Wednesday to a plan to raise the state income tax to fund schools, police and Medicaid. The legislation, introduced Monday by Gov. Martin O'Malley and backed by the Democratic leaders of the House and Senate, would subject top-earning Marylanders to the seventh-highest income tax rate in the country, according to the National Tax Foundation. Their rate now ranks 10th. The measure also would raise taxes on some tobacco products and fees on some state transactions.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley announced Friday that he is calling lawmakers back to Annapolis for a special session of the General Assembly to complete work on budget-related bills  that failed to win approval  before the clock ran out on the regular 90-day session that ended April 9. The governor's announcement came as no surprise after Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said Wednesday that he had asked senators to set aside May 14-15 for what...
NEWS
By RICHARD E. COHEN | July 4, 1993
Now that the House and Senate have separately passed their versions of President Clinton's economic package -- with various factions making impacts on the legislation -- key power-brokers in each chamber will lead the effort to resolve the differences.The spotlight will fall on two members: House Ways and Means committee chairman Dan Rostenkowski, D-Ill., and Senate Finance Committee chairman Daniel Patrick Moynihan, D-N.Y. In the hands of the old-style Chicago pol and the former Harvard professor rests the fate of the measure and its countless details.
NEWS
March 22, 1993
Here's the status of major issues pending before the 1993 General Assembly:AIDS: Both the House and Senate have killed Schaefer administration legislation that would have required doctors and laboratories to report the names of people infected with the virus that causes AIDS.BALTIMORE CONVENTION CENTER:House and Senate committees have not yet acted on the governor's proposed $150 million expansion of the Baltimore Convention Center.BUDGET: The House of Delegates has approved a $12.5 billion budget for fiscal 1994.
NEWS
April 27, 2012
Not one but two more special sessions of the Maryland General Assembly? And all because the state House and Senate wasted the regular session on trivial matters and expressions of ego. Neither the so-called governor nor his two minions in the legislature should draw a salary for the dog and pony show they exhibited this year. Maybe that would help defray the costs of this double-dipping. Even Doc Holliday said that his hypocrisy only went so far. F. Cordell, Lutherville
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley on Thursday accepted some of the blame for the budget impasse that left the state with a spending plan that cuts about half a billion dollars from key Democratic priorities such as education. "We all hold blame," O'Malley, a Democrat, said on WTOP's monthly Ask the Governor show. "We're all public servants. ... When the public is ill-served, as the public is right now, we all share the responsibility. " "I wish we had had a different result," he said. "It was not for lack of trying.
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