Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHourly Workers
IN THE NEWS

Hourly Workers

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Barbara Rose and Barbara Rose,Chicago Tribune | March 14, 2007
A year ago when employees at Citigroup Inc.'s South Dakota credit-card center were offered a chance to pick schedules that better fit their lives, Deb Qualseth jumped at the opportunity to work 10-hour days and take Fridays off. "It helps you juggle what happens outside this place," said the billing-dispute specialist. "It's made a huge difference." Historically, only a handful of professionals enjoyed control over when or where they worked. But some companies, including Citigroup, are offering greater flexibility to hourly workers with traditionally rigid schedules as a way to reduce turnover, increase efficiency or compete in tighter labor markets.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 29, 2014
"No one who works full-time should ever have to raise a family in poverty. " That was the message President Barack Obama brought from Tuesday night's State of the Union address to a Costco warehouse in Lanham on Wednesday morning, and it's hard to believe that there's much disagreement on that sentiment. Yet based on the reaction from Congressional Republicans, one would think that President Obama's decision to issue an executive order raising the minimum wage for new federal contractual workers to $10.10 per hour from the current $7.25 was tantamount to socialism.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Detroit Free Press | March 28, 2007
DETROIT -- When Ford Motor Co. handed out bonuses for 2006 this month, the checks that high-level managers got were a lot more than the $300 to $800 most workers throughout the company received. About 6,000 high-level managers at Ford operations around the world were eligible to receive bonuses that ranged from several thousand dollars to $15,000 or more, employees with knowledge of the bonuses told the Detroit Free Press. This month, Ford said it would pay what it called "modest bonuses" to all of its hourly and salaried workers below the rank of manager despite having posted a record $12.7 billion loss last year and having missed important market share goals.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
Three restaurant workers at Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport have filed a collective action lawsuit that accuses the operator of five airport restaurants of failing to pay minimum and overtime wages. The federal lawsuit, filed Oct. 11 in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, alleged Aero Service Group Inc. had a policy of paying hourly workers two separate paychecks for the same pay period and failing to pay overtime for more than 40 hours worked in a week.
BUSINESS
By JIM MATEJA AND RICK POPELY and JIM MATEJA AND RICK POPELY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 25, 2006
General Motors Corp., reeling from $10.6 billion in losses last year, will fire hundreds of its U.S. salaried employees starting next week, according to people familiar with the plan. GM's engineering staff has been told all leaves have been canceled. They have been ordered to report for work Tuesday morning - what employees already are calling "Black Tuesday" - with company cars and keys. GM wouldn't comment on Tuesday's meeting, but insiders said only the engineering staff is affected - for now. The firings will be followed by another round in April, according to at least three GM people with direct knowledge of the plan who declined to be identified because it hasn't been made public.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 28, 2004
DETROIT - General Motors Corp. has told more than 9,000 workers at five plants that primarily make SUVs and pickup trucks that they will be laid off for a week or more early next year as the company continues to reduce production of its vehicles. That is in addition to the indefinite layoff of 900 workers in Pontiac, Mich., disclosed by GM last week. While the five plants are on shutdown, hourly workers will see their pay drop about 35 percent. The shutdowns will follow the normal holiday breaks . GM spokesman Dan Flores said the cutbacks are a market-driven decision to bring production in line with "market forecasts and current demand," and he noted the automaker is also increasing manufacturing at some plants.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1996
About 160 workers have been laid off at the AlliedSignal Inc. Communications Systems plant in Towson due to declining defense business, the company confirmed yesterday.Another 45 layoffs planned for early March were averted by the recent addition of work on the Patriot missile."We had to scale down the size of the work force because of an anticipated decline in sales this year," said AlliedSignal spokeswoman Maria Trentis Stamas.She said plant officials expect sales, which have ranged between $180 million and $200 million, to be off about 15 percent.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | March 27, 2009
General Motors said Thursday that more than 7,500 workers, including about 30 in the Baltimore area, have signed up to take buyouts or early retirement as the financially troubled automaker restructures to avoid bankruptcy. The Powertrain Baltimore Transmission Plant in White Marsh will lose about 26 hourly workers. About 238 hourly employees and 40 salaried workers currently work at the plant. And four employees who worked at an assembly plant in Southeast Baltimore that closed in 2005 will take buyouts or retirements.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1999
General Motors Corp. has lost another scrimmage with the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation over the payment of unemployment benefits to workers at its Baltimore van assembly plant.A three-member appeals board of the department ruled yesterday against the automaker's request that workers at its Baltimore plant repay one week in unemployment benefits they received last year.About 2,900 hourly workers at the plant received unemployment benefits last summer when the factory was closed for 10 weeks as a result of strikes at GM parts plants in Flint, Mich.
BUSINESS
By DETROIT FREE PRESS | March 18, 2006
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp., Delphi Corp. and the United Auto Workers are close to an agreement on a major job-cutting plan to offer retirement packages to thousands of blue-collar workers, a pact that would help the struggling automaker avert a crippling strike at the auto parts supplier, sources familiar with the talks said yesterday. GM and the UAW are expected to announce details of the package as early as today. It could spur one of the largest exoduses of people from the automaker in its history.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
It's not every day that a major corporation announces that it will bring 1,000 jobs to Baltimore City, so we have reason to cheer Amazon.com's decision to open a 1 million square foot distribution center here. Baltimore's official unemployment rate stands at 10.8 percent, and if you count people who have dropped out of the workforce, it's much higher than that. We need any jobs we can get. Meanwhile, the establishment of a physical presence for the company here means that Amazon will have to start charging sales tax on Marylanders' purchases, and while we all may rue the end of that loophole in the tax collection system, it's a good thing both for Maryland-based retailers and for the state treasury.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | March 27, 2009
General Motors said Thursday that more than 7,500 workers, including about 30 in the Baltimore area, have signed up to take buyouts or early retirement as the financially troubled automaker restructures to avoid bankruptcy. The Powertrain Baltimore Transmission Plant in White Marsh will lose about 26 hourly workers. About 238 hourly employees and 40 salaried workers currently work at the plant. And four employees who worked at an assembly plant in Southeast Baltimore that closed in 2005 will take buyouts or retirements.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | March 14, 2009
Power tool maker Black & Decker Corp. is cutting salaries and suspending 401(k) matches for U.S. employees in response to the global recession and declining revenues, the company said yesterday. Starting with the first pay period in April, the Towson company said base salaries of top executives will be cut by 10 percent, salaried employees by 5 percent, and salaried workers who qualify for overtime by 2.5 percent. Black & Decker Chief Executive Officer Nolan D. Archibald, who made $11.1 million in total compensation in 2007, will likely take a $150,000 cut from his $1.5 million base salary.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Hanah Cho and Meredith Cohn and Hanah Cho,Sun reporters | August 3, 2007
Official word began trickling in by e-mail, fax and cell phone before dawn yesterday to workers on the early shift. By midday, one way or another, most all of the 2,100 or so hourly workers at the Sparrows Point steel mill had been told the name of the plant's newest owner - the fourth in four years. The specifics were few, but workers felt relief at knowing - after weeks of not knowing. Some heard good things about Chicago-based Esmark Inc. They heard top company executives were "real steel men," that management had good relations with labor, and that Esmark owns a finishing mill that could use the steel slabs made at Sparrows Point.
BUSINESS
By Detroit Free Press | March 28, 2007
DETROIT -- When Ford Motor Co. handed out bonuses for 2006 this month, the checks that high-level managers got were a lot more than the $300 to $800 most workers throughout the company received. About 6,000 high-level managers at Ford operations around the world were eligible to receive bonuses that ranged from several thousand dollars to $15,000 or more, employees with knowledge of the bonuses told the Detroit Free Press. This month, Ford said it would pay what it called "modest bonuses" to all of its hourly and salaried workers below the rank of manager despite having posted a record $12.7 billion loss last year and having missed important market share goals.
BUSINESS
By Barbara Rose and Barbara Rose,Chicago Tribune | March 14, 2007
A year ago when employees at Citigroup Inc.'s South Dakota credit-card center were offered a chance to pick schedules that better fit their lives, Deb Qualseth jumped at the opportunity to work 10-hour days and take Fridays off. "It helps you juggle what happens outside this place," said the billing-dispute specialist. "It's made a huge difference." Historically, only a handful of professionals enjoyed control over when or where they worked. But some companies, including Citigroup, are offering greater flexibility to hourly workers with traditionally rigid schedules as a way to reduce turnover, increase efficiency or compete in tighter labor markets.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
Three restaurant workers at Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport have filed a collective action lawsuit that accuses the operator of five airport restaurants of failing to pay minimum and overtime wages. The federal lawsuit, filed Oct. 11 in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, alleged Aero Service Group Inc. had a policy of paying hourly workers two separate paychecks for the same pay period and failing to pay overtime for more than 40 hours worked in a week.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 14, 2001
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. - DaimlerChrysler AG's Chrysler unit said yesterday that it had agreed with the United Auto Workers union on voluntary retirement incentives of $35,000 per worker as it tries to cut one-fifth of its work force. Half of the incentive amount would be a one-time cash payment, with the rest going toward buying a selected Chrysler, Dodge or Jeep vehicle, the company said. Eligible hourly workers must be 60 years old with at least 10 years of service; have 30 years of service; or be 55 to 59 years old and have combined age and service years of at least 85. "They needed to work out some sort of kicker for people who are close to retirement age to keep them from sticking around," said Rod Lache, an analyst at Deutsche Banc Alex.
BUSINESS
By ALLISON CONNOLLY AND HANAH CHO and ALLISON CONNOLLY AND HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTERS | April 5, 2006
More than 800 Baltimore-area General Motors workers received their buyout packets yesterday, giving them 45 days to decide whether to accept a severance package and leave the troubled automaker. Hourly workers at GM's Allison Transmission plant in Baltimore County and displaced workers from the now-shuttered Broening Highway van assembly plant in East Baltimore were invited to meetings yesterday. Company officials and a member of the United Auto Workers union explained the buyouts. In an attempt to dig itself out from financial troubles, the automaker said last month it would offer voluntary separation agreements or buyouts to its entire hourly work force of 113,000.
BUSINESS
By JIM MATEJA AND RICK POPELY and JIM MATEJA AND RICK POPELY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 25, 2006
General Motors Corp., reeling from $10.6 billion in losses last year, will fire hundreds of its U.S. salaried employees starting next week, according to people familiar with the plan. GM's engineering staff has been told all leaves have been canceled. They have been ordered to report for work Tuesday morning - what employees already are calling "Black Tuesday" - with company cars and keys. GM wouldn't comment on Tuesday's meeting, but insiders said only the engineering staff is affected - for now. The firings will be followed by another round in April, according to at least three GM people with direct knowledge of the plan who declined to be identified because it hasn't been made public.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.