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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | January 11, 2009
If you're a traveler looking for a budget-friendly destination, Brazil should be on your 2009 list. According to CheapTickets.com, Brazil offers savings of 58 percent in April, a time when the southern hemisphere's summer crowds have moved on, yet the warm weather still lingers. Most people think of Rio de Janeiro when they think of Brazil, but thanks to the arrival of low-cost air carriers, getting around Brazil is easier and more affordable than ever. Here are five things to do in Brazil: 1 Check out Carnival : This lively spectacle takes place in cities throughout Brazil, beginning in late February.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
While many Baltimoreans associate Shuckers of Fells Point with its outdoor patio and picturesque views of the harbor, it has long been a good, if underrated, place to watch a game. Like Looney's Pub in Canton, Shuckers separates itself from surrounding bars with its abundance of TVs. On Sunday, 40 flat-screen TVs will be on at a time, with most tuned (appropriately) to the Ravens' Battle of the Beltways against the Redskins. So even if you can't grab the comfortable leather couch in the back, there will still be plenty of seats and screens available.
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NEWS
By Cathy Brown | August 1, 2001
IF IT WORKS, why try to fix it? Cherry Hill was a planned community long before it was fashionable, and it has labored under a less-than-desirable reputation since its birth in the early 1940s. That doesn't change the fact that there are many hard-working, proud people who call Cherry Hill home. Those are the people who were distressed when the community was overrun by drugs and the related criminal activity which most urban communities have experienced in recent years. HotSpot was the salvation for Cherry Hill because it gave us the vehicle to make the community safer, and that was our first step toward revitalization.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 25, 2012
Sea levels are rising faster along the Atlantic coast - including in the Chesapeake Bay - than elsewhere around the world, and the increase appears to be accelerating, according to federal scientists. In a paper published online in Nature Climate Change , the U.S. Geological Survey reports that sea level rise is increasing three to four times faster than globally along a heavily-populated 600-mile stretch of coast from Cape  Hatteras, NC to north of Boston.  Since 1990, the rise has increased 2 to 3.7 millimeters per year in the "hotspot," as the federal scientists call it, compared with a global increase of 0.6 to 1 millimeter per year.  That hotspot includes the Chesapeake Bay, according to USGS oceanographer Asbury H. Sallenger, lead author of the report.
NEWS
By Natalie Harvey and Natalie Harvey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 6, 1998
HAVE YOU heard about a "Hotspot Community"? At 7: 30 p.m. Thursday, , a meeting will be held at Long Reach High School, where Howard County Police Officer Lisa Bridgeforth will explain in detail how Hotspot affects you, your family and neighbors.Hotspot is a statewide initiative to systematically help high-crime and at-risk neighborhoods reclaim their streets from violence, drugs and fear.Did I hear "Not in Columbia?"Yes, because in Columbia -- as in any area whose population has tripled in 30 years -- crime has increased.
NEWS
By Kimberly Marselas and Kimberly Marselas,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 22, 2000
Looking for remedies to heal four troubled neighborhoods, four Anne Arundel legislators are calling for the state to spend more money to help low-income buyers find mortgages. The four have requested that next year's budget aid HotSpot communities by channeling more money from the state's mortgage assistance program to low-income homebuyers in those areas. Dels. John R. Leopold, Joan Cadden and Mary M. Rosso and state Sen. Philip C. Jimeno sent a letter to the chairman of the House Health and Human Resources Subcommittee urging him to include changes in the housing budget that would benefit HotSpot communities.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Howard Libit and Del Quentin Wilber and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2001
A program at the heart of Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend's crime-fighting strategies has come under attack from city police officials who question its effectiveness and are cutting the number of officers assigned to the effort. Police Commissioner Edward T. Norris criticized the HotSpot Initiative, writing in a letter yesterday to state officials that "we cannot and will not return to the failed policies of the past, which, for political reasons, favored some neighborhoods over others."
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1999
Joan Fisher's minivan crawls along the alley behind First Street in Brooklyn Heights.The way Fisher sees it, the back yards of the World War II-era red brick rowhouses tell the story of this troubled Anne Arundel county neighborhood, just south of the Baltimore City line."
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2001
In a terse letter yesterday, the president of Baltimore's police union accused Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend of "political grandstanding" on the HotSpot issue that has pitted her office against police. "While I acknowledge your disappointment with the recent downsizing of the HotSpot program, I ask you to understand that political grandstanding and strategies that grab headlines do very little to reduce crime," Officer Gary McLhinney, president of the Fraternal Order of Police, Lodge 3, wrote.
NEWS
March 26, 1997
TANEYTOWN IS the crime "hot spot" of Carroll County? That's the opinion of county Commissioner W. Benjamin Brown, who tipped the governor's office to pick the northwest Carroll town for a cut of $3.5 million in federal and state crime prevention grants.Not that Taneytown is rocked by crime waves or fighting a hard-core problem.Rather, the incorporated city of nearly 5,000 residents is willing to take a pro-active role toward community and social problems that can foster criminal activity.
TRAVEL
By Liz Atwood | December 20, 2009
Perhaps no other U.S. city is as closely linked to Mexican history as San Antonio. So even though San Antonio was no longer part of Mexico when the Mexican army defeated the invading French at the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862, the city celebrates its Mexican heritage throughout the year. This is especially true at the holidays when traditional luminarias and pinatas shine throughout the city. But even if you don't visit at Christmastime, there's plenty to do all year long. 1 Remember the Alamo : Texas' No. 1 tourist attraction marks the site where 189 defenders fell to Santa Anna's army on March 6, 1836.
TRAVEL
By Kayla Cross and Kayla Cross,The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2009
As visitors take to the cobblestone paths of this town, they are walking along the steps of history. When Vilnius was being built there was an entry fee of one stone per visitor. The collection was used to create the town's walls and roads. Today, entry to the town and many of its historic sites is free. This year Lithuania celebrates its millennium anniversary, and Vilnius styles itself as the European Capital of the World, with its vision to create a city that is open to new ideas and culture.
TRAVEL
By Kayla Cross and Kayla Cross,The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2009
The Catskills region of New York is known for the mountains that dominate the horizon, wildlife centers and, of course, 1969's Woodstock Music Festival. Relive memories of the celebrated hippie hoedown or create new ones with the area's many shops and parks. Visit the site of the "Aquarian Exposition" in Bethel, now home to an arts center and museum, just in time for the 40th anniversary. 1 Remember the tie dye: : The Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, on the site of the Woodstock Festival (Aug.
TRAVEL
By Ethan Goldberg | June 14, 2009
Myrtle Beach, the largest city along the Grand Strand, is an ideal vacation destination for families on any budget, attracting nearly 14 million visitors per year. Beyond the white beaches that blanket the coast of the Atlantic Ocean lies a sea of entertainment, activity and nature. Although Myrtle Beach is already firmly established, the variety of new theme parks and resorts prove that the region is still blooming. 1 Ride through Freestyle Music Park : This 55-acre amusement park, formerly Hard Rock Park, features roller coasters, play areas, restaurants, stores and an amphitheater for live shows.
TRAVEL
By Kayla Cross and Katherine McNaboe | June 7, 2009
Even in 1671, pioneers were astounded by the blue mountains and vast valley in southwestern Virginia. Now the Roanoke Valley, less than a five-hour drive from Baltimore, is a place for visitors to explore the natural beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains and discover both the historical and modern features of Roanoke. Here are five things to see and do: 1 Tour the Taubman. This museum is a work of art - inside and out - and displays early American art, exquisite handbags and contemporary photography.
TRAVEL
By Ethan Goldberg | May 31, 2009
Charleston's rich history and culture challenge many stereotypes of the South. Founded in 1670, the "The Holy City" is known for its charm, religious tolerance and superb manners. Last year, Travel + Leisure magazine named Charleston one of the top 10 cities in the U.S. Here are five things to see and do: 1 Spy on Spoleto. Celebrate the Piccolo Spoleto Festival USA. Modeled after Italy's Festival of the Two Worlds, this annual 17-day arts and entertainment explosion seizes Charleston until June 7, hosting more than 700 music, dance, theatre, visual arts, and family events from around the world, including the opera Louise, the U.S. premiere of the play Don John, jazz singer Ren?
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1999
In two new HotSpot grants announced yesterday, Brooklyn Heights will receive $123,000 in state funds next year to fight crime and get tough on absentee landlords with shabby homes, and Parole will get $105,700 to boost the Neighborhood Watch program and help clean the community's streets.The awards are among 36 grants announced by the Governor's Office on Crime Control and Prevention. The $6.3 million statewide expansion of the program adds 26 communities and expands the boundaries of six others.
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