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NEWS
By Howard P. Rawlings | August 7, 1995
WITH THE RECENT uproar over management of the city's convention bureau, an important related matter received little attention. It was a historic commitment by the major downtown hotels and restaurants to ensure that more Baltimore City residents share in the fruits of the tourism industry.Long after the battle of wills between Mayor Kurt Schmoke and the leaders of the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association becomes a little-remembered footnote in the city's history, the tourism industry's agreement with state and city officials will be benefiting local residents.
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | August 29, 2012
In and around the track, here's what hotels and restaurants are offering for race fans. All of them are open to the public. The Marriott Inner Harbor at Camden Yards is the official hotel sponsor of the Grand Prix of Baltimore Presented by SRT, as well as the official hotel sponsor of Team Baltimore Racing. They will be offering a series of promotions and events for the public all weekend long. On Friday, Aug. 31, the hotel will host a Team Baltimore Racing Happy Hour, open to the public, featuring a live performance by the Crawdaddies.
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BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2002
Micros Systems Inc., a Columbia company that makes technology for hotels and restaurants, reported yesterday that its earnings more than tripled as revenue increased slightly for its fiscal first quarter. "Overall, to make money in this environment, I think is a real accomplishment," said Peter J. Rogers Jr., vice president of investor relations for Micros. The company reported net income of $2.7 million, or 15 cents per diluted share, for the quarter that ended Sept. 30. That compares with a net income of $879,000, or 5 cents per share, in the first fiscal quarter last year.
TRAVEL
By Susan Stellin and Susan Stellin,New York Times News Service | November 30, 2003
If you pick up a copy of Mobil's 2004 guide to the best hotels and restaurants in America, you'll find just three five-star hotels listed in New York City. Mobil's main competitor in the expanding world of hospitality ratings, the Automobile Association of America, is almost as discriminating: AAA gave its highest award -- five diamonds -- to just five New York City hotels when the company announced its 2004 winners last week. Tough critics, those old-timers, who have been rating American hotels for decades (Mobil since 1958, AAA since 1977)
NEWS
March 13, 1998
HAD DEVELOPERS proposed a 14-screen multiplex cinema in the business district near Baltimore-Washington International Airport in Linthicum a decade ago, they might have been laughed out of the room. Nearby office parks were wastelands at night. The few residents whose homes predated BWI were being moved out because of noxious jet noise. Build a theater there? Who could hear the soundtrack?How times have changed. No one is laughing at Hoyts Cinema Corp., the Australian chain that opens its $8.5 million West Nursery theater complex today.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | December 4, 1993
In an effort to break an impasse between the BUILD organization and downtown hotels, the chairman of the House Appropriations Committee is calling for a "summit" on the future of Baltimore's hospitality industry.Talks between Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development and downtown hoteliers over pay, benefits and career advancement in the industry broke down last summer."The time has come for all of us to move forward towards goals and solutions and away from accusations and threats," Del. Howard P. Rawlings, a Baltimore Democrat, said in a three-page proposal.
TRAVEL
By Tricia Bishop | March 19, 2000
Memorable hotels and No. 1 guests The National Trust Historic Hotels of America knows a few travel destinations you can visit to show your patriotism during this election year -- 145 of them, in fact. The hotels identified by the trust have all maintained their historic structures and charms, and many boast presidential memories. On Nov. 11, 1918, for example, former President Taft slept through the armistice declaration of World War I at the Pfister in Milwaukee, Wis. Reporters woke him up to tell him the news.
NEWS
October 8, 1990
NOW THAT THE Belvedere Hotel seems destined to become a condominium apartment building, it is worth recalling that the hotel's owners nearly rejected the name that has identified this landmark building for the past 87 years.When plans for a new hotel at the corner of Charles and Chase streets were discussed around the turn of the century, proposed names included Iroquis, Roosevelt, Garrett and even Balmar.The Belvedere opened in 1903. Over the years it would include presidents and notables among its guests.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | August 29, 2012
In and around the track, here's what hotels and restaurants are offering for race fans. All of them are open to the public. The Marriott Inner Harbor at Camden Yards is the official hotel sponsor of the Grand Prix of Baltimore Presented by SRT, as well as the official hotel sponsor of Team Baltimore Racing. They will be offering a series of promotions and events for the public all weekend long. On Friday, Aug. 31, the hotel will host a Team Baltimore Racing Happy Hour, open to the public, featuring a live performance by the Crawdaddies.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | December 12, 1991
Marriott Corp., beset by lingering weakness in the real estate and lodging industries, said it expects to receive $220 million in cash within the next two months as it completes the sale of a number of hotels and restaurants.Through three separate agreements that were approved by Marriott's board last week, the Bethesda-based company plans to sell 14 new Courtyard by Marriott hotels, 110 family restaurants in California and certain time-share mortgages held by the its resorts division.Proceeds from the sales would be used to reduce bank debt, the company said.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2003
A vacant, overgrown property on U.S. 1 in Howard County that has contributed for years to the old boulevard's worn-out appearance may be on the verge of a transformation - a possible foreshadowing of the community renaissance that local leaders are trying to engineer. Trustees for the 17 acres in Elkridge - once a drive-in theater - want to build restaurants, offices, a five-story hotel and nearly 370 apartments for senior citizens. Barry and Charu Mehta of Columbia, who bought the land in 1985 and later put it in a trust, have done little with the property beyond using it for a short-lived flea market.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2002
Micros Systems Inc., a Columbia company that makes technology for hotels and restaurants, reported yesterday that its earnings more than tripled as revenue increased slightly for its fiscal first quarter. "Overall, to make money in this environment, I think is a real accomplishment," said Peter J. Rogers Jr., vice president of investor relations for Micros. The company reported net income of $2.7 million, or 15 cents per diluted share, for the quarter that ended Sept. 30. That compares with a net income of $879,000, or 5 cents per share, in the first fiscal quarter last year.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2001
In the months leading up to last week's opening of the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, managers interviewed thousands of potential employees -- including some who didn't know they were being interviewed. Managers frequented restaurants and shops around town, watched and listened, and then slipped cards to certain workers. "YOU IMPRESSED ME!" read the cards, which had a picture of the hotel on the front and an invitation to apply for a job inside. Marketing Director Mike Waterman said he handed out at least 50. That's just one of the aggressive methods of recruiting workers that hotels have resorted to in recent years as unemployment has hit record lows, and workers have found jobs outside the traditionally low-paying hospitality industry.
TRAVEL
By Tricia Bishop | March 19, 2000
Memorable hotels and No. 1 guests The National Trust Historic Hotels of America knows a few travel destinations you can visit to show your patriotism during this election year -- 145 of them, in fact. The hotels identified by the trust have all maintained their historic structures and charms, and many boast presidential memories. On Nov. 11, 1918, for example, former President Taft slept through the armistice declaration of World War I at the Pfister in Milwaukee, Wis. Reporters woke him up to tell him the news.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1999
James S. D'Agostino Sr. worked his way up in the hotel and restaurant business, beginning as a waiter in Manhattan and ending his career as the last manager of Baltimore's stately Alcazar Hotel.The former Pikesville resident died Thursday in his sleep at the Charlestown retirement community in Catonsville. He was 91.Mr. D'Agostino was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and began working as a waiter and maitre d'hotel at restaurants in Manhattan hotels, including the Waldorf-Astoria, where he seated movie star Greta Garbo and tenor Enrico Caruso during the 1930s, according to family members.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1998
Planning a business trip or vacation by car can be a lot like work. But travelers are increasingly ditching maps, atlases and guidebooks in favor of software that does most of the work for them.The Internet has free Web sites that can quickly pinpoint an address or get you fast directions from here to there. MapQuest (www.mapquest.com) and Maps On Us (www.mapsonus.com) are two of the more popular online destinations.But most map sites can't create elaborate custom itineraries or dig up nearby hotels and restaurants.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | July 11, 1992
The Peabody Court Hotel, the lovingly restored inn and gourmet restaurant in Mount Vernon, is set to be sold along with its award-winning restaurant, The Conservatory, to a Washington-based hotel chain, the prospective buyer said yesterday.Paul Whetsell, president of CapStar Hotels Inc., said that his company has an agreement in principle with NationsBank of Charlotte, N.C., to acquire the property and that he expects to close the deal around Sept. 1. Representatives of the bank could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Peter Jensen contributed to this article | March 21, 1995
A bill weakening Maryland's landmark workplace smoking ban easily won final approval in the state legislature last night.The House of Delegates voted 92 to 39 to exempt hotels, bars and many restaurants from the ban, which takes effect Monday. A few hours later, the Senate agreed, 35 to 11.Gov. Parris N. Glendening has promised to veto the bill "with a great deal of personal conviction." But legislators say they have enough votes to override the veto as early as next week.Even in its watered-down form, the ban will be one of the toughest in the nation, legislators say. It forbids smoking in offices, factories, stores, restaurants without liquor licenses, and even work vehicles occupied by more than one employee.
NEWS
March 13, 1998
HAD DEVELOPERS proposed a 14-screen multiplex cinema in the business district near Baltimore-Washington International Airport in Linthicum a decade ago, they might have been laughed out of the room. Nearby office parks were wastelands at night. The few residents whose homes predated BWI were being moved out because of noxious jet noise. Build a theater there? Who could hear the soundtrack?How times have changed. No one is laughing at Hoyts Cinema Corp., the Australian chain that opens its $8.5 million West Nursery theater complex today.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 27, 1996
LONDON -- It's when Peter Zimmer recites a complicated recipe for a Thanksgiving starter of smoked squab topped by a cranberry relish laden with spices and served on a special gourmet chip, that you, as an American in London, just want to shriek:Ever hear of pumpkin soup, pal?But you don't. This is Zimmer's demonstration lunch. This is what most among the audience of 10 women paid $32 to hear from the chef who put Baltimore's Joy America Cafe on the culinary map.They want something different.
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