Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHotel California
IN THE NEWS

Hotel California

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
By Alfredo Corchado and Alfredo Corchado,The Dallas Morning News | March 30, 2008
TODOS SANTOS, Mexico -- HIGHWAY 19 IS BADLY PAVED, A narrow ribbon between desert and Pacific Ocean that leads to rock 'n' roll legend. All roads in this tranquil artists' village lead to a decades-old hotel where a friendly Canadian owner, Debbie Stewart, breaks into a huge smile and says coyly to visitors, "Welcome to the Hotel California." Next door, mission bells toll, and across the street at a bar called Tequila Sunrise, the song "Hotel California" blares from a jukebox for the fifth time in two hours.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
By Alfredo Corchado and Alfredo Corchado,The Dallas Morning News | March 30, 2008
TODOS SANTOS, Mexico -- HIGHWAY 19 IS BADLY PAVED, A narrow ribbon between desert and Pacific Ocean that leads to rock 'n' roll legend. All roads in this tranquil artists' village lead to a decades-old hotel where a friendly Canadian owner, Debbie Stewart, breaks into a huge smile and says coyly to visitors, "Welcome to the Hotel California." Next door, mission bells toll, and across the street at a bar called Tequila Sunrise, the song "Hotel California" blares from a jukebox for the fifth time in two hours.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
By Ricardo Sandoval and Ricardo Sandoval,Dallas Morning News | May 20, 2001
David Galloway is pondering life in Todos Santos, a magical Mexican hamlet he calls home six months of the year. The friends at his table are fixed on his storytelling, mindlessly stirring their lattes, served in bowls, in the bougainvillea-shrouded patio of Cafe Todos Santos. The ponytailed Galloway said it took just one brief stop several years ago, while exploring the southern tip of Mexico's Baja California peninsula, to decide this would be the place he'd hang out while fall and winter have their way with his other home in Vancouver, British Columbia.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL BOOTH and MICHAEL BOOTH,THE DENVER POST | August 7, 2006
Quick, who's got the best-selling music album of all time? The Beatles, right? The White Album, no doubt, or Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, or one of the hits collections. No? Hmmm. Gotta be Elvis, then. Wait, wait, don't say it. It must be the Stones. U2? The Police? Who was bigger than any of those? The Eagles and their little pop masterpieces, that's who. The "top this" distinction of the most copies of one album title ever sold in the United States - 29 million and counting - belongs to The Eagles: Their Greatest Hits 1971-1975.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1999
1974: Sonny, Cher split 1975: Queen releases "Bohemian Rhapsody" 1976: Eagles open "Hotel California" 1977: Elvis dies
FEATURES
January 31, 1997
A look at how things have changed -- or haven't -- since "Star Wars" made its first pass through the galaxy:1977In the White House: A former Southern governor who admits lusting in his heart.In the bookstores: "The Falconer," "A Rumor of War," "The Complete Book of Running," "The Thorn Birds"On the tube: "Roots," "The Love Boat," "Charlie's Angels," "All in the Family," "Saturday Night Live"Sounds of '77: "Rumours" (Fleetwood Mac); "Hotel California" (Eagles); "Stayin' Alive" (Bee Gees); "I'm Your Boogie Man" (K.C.
NEWS
By ERIK HIMMELSBACH | July 2, 2006
Hotel California The True-Life Adventures of Crosby, Stills, Nash, Young, Mitchell, Taylor, Browne, Ronstadt, Geffen, the Eagles, and Their Many Friends Barney Hoskyns Wiley / 324 pages / $25.95 Coming down hard off the Technicolor freakout of Vietnam, the assassinations of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, and the divisive election of President Richard Nixon, musicians began ditching didactic rock in favor of a mellow brand of...
FEATURES
By MICHAEL BOOTH and MICHAEL BOOTH,THE DENVER POST | August 7, 2006
Quick, who's got the best-selling music album of all time? The Beatles, right? The White Album, no doubt, or Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, or one of the hits collections. No? Hmmm. Gotta be Elvis, then. Wait, wait, don't say it. It must be the Stones. U2? The Police? Who was bigger than any of those? The Eagles and their little pop masterpieces, that's who. The "top this" distinction of the most copies of one album title ever sold in the United States - 29 million and counting - belongs to The Eagles: Their Greatest Hits 1971-1975.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | November 6, 2005
Fairfax, Va. -- It's best not to cross The Junkies. The four guys who host a three-hour midday chat show on WJFK radio here are not what you would call vicious. Much of their banter, about sports, women and the youth they shared, is deliberately sophomoric. But any listener dumb enough to call in and challenge anything they've said on the air is instantly labeled a "doofus" and cut off with the noxious, conclusive sound of a flushing toilet. Such pleasantries - with attendant guffaws, taunts and jeers - will be part of the Baltimore area's mornings starting on Jan. 3, when The Junkies take over the slot on WHFS (under its new frequency, 105.7 FM)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Staff | July 10, 2003
Eagles / MCI Center The Eagles are the biggest-selling band in pop history. Their tunes -- "Hotel California," "I Can't Tell You Why" and others -- are bona fide classics. They play this weekend, Friday and Saturday nights, at MCI Center in Washington. Both shows start at 8, and tickets are $45-$175. Call 410-481-SEAT or visit www.ticketmaster.com for tickets. Vince Gill / Wolf Trap With his good looks, warm charm and emotive vocals, Vince Gill is one of country's most alluring singing sensations.
NEWS
By ERIK HIMMELSBACH | July 2, 2006
Hotel California The True-Life Adventures of Crosby, Stills, Nash, Young, Mitchell, Taylor, Browne, Ronstadt, Geffen, the Eagles, and Their Many Friends Barney Hoskyns Wiley / 324 pages / $25.95 Coming down hard off the Technicolor freakout of Vietnam, the assassinations of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, and the divisive election of President Richard Nixon, musicians began ditching didactic rock in favor of a mellow brand of...
TRAVEL
By Ricardo Sandoval and Ricardo Sandoval,Dallas Morning News | May 20, 2001
David Galloway is pondering life in Todos Santos, a magical Mexican hamlet he calls home six months of the year. The friends at his table are fixed on his storytelling, mindlessly stirring their lattes, served in bowls, in the bougainvillea-shrouded patio of Cafe Todos Santos. The ponytailed Galloway said it took just one brief stop several years ago, while exploring the southern tip of Mexico's Baja California peninsula, to decide this would be the place he'd hang out while fall and winter have their way with his other home in Vancouver, British Columbia.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1999
1974: Sonny, Cher split 1975: Queen releases "Bohemian Rhapsody" 1976: Eagles open "Hotel California" 1977: Elvis dies
FEATURES
January 31, 1997
A look at how things have changed -- or haven't -- since "Star Wars" made its first pass through the galaxy:1977In the White House: A former Southern governor who admits lusting in his heart.In the bookstores: "The Falconer," "A Rumor of War," "The Complete Book of Running," "The Thorn Birds"On the tube: "Roots," "The Love Boat," "Charlie's Angels," "All in the Family," "Saturday Night Live"Sounds of '77: "Rumours" (Fleetwood Mac); "Hotel California" (Eagles); "Stayin' Alive" (Bee Gees); "I'm Your Boogie Man" (K.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | May 22, 2003
Theatergoers here and in Europe have already taken in a raft of shows that revolve around the familiar music artists, such as those listed below. But whose lives should the musical theater world take on next? Lives already in song Mamma Mia! Abba Lost Highway, Hank Williams The Jackie Wilson Story, Jackie Wilson Dream a Little Dream, The Mamas and the Papas Movin' Out, Billy Joel The Look of Love, Burt Bacharach and Hal David Almost Heaven, John Denver Our House, Madness Cliff the Musical, Cliff Richard Taboo, Boy George We Will Rock You, Queen Love, Janis, Janis Joplin Ambassador, Satch Louis Armstrong The next topics?
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD OLLISON and RASHOD OLLISON,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2005
I VIVIDLY remember lying in the back of Christine, floating between consciousness and dreaming. Christine was what my two sisters and I called Mama's "deuce and a quarter," her beat-up, unreliable Buick Electra 225. The sun had melted as we headed back to Hot Springs, Ark., from a visit with relatives in nearby Malvern. Mama sat at the wheel humming along to the Eagles' soul-dipped ballad "I Can't Tell You Why." As the song drifted off the radio, I thought it was so pretty but the guy singing it (bassist Timothy Schmit)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.