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NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 10, 2012
The mild winter meant a dearth of heating degree days. Early in the cooling degree days season, the warm trend is having the opposite result. Degree days are a measure of how much energy is needed to warm homes to 65 degrees in winter. One degree day means a one-degree difference between a day's average temperature and 65.   The heating season was more than 1,100 degree days short of normal because the mild weather meant furnaces were given a break. The average temperature this winter was 5 degrees above normal, making it one of the mildest winters on record , and the 1.8 inches of snow was the least since 1972.
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NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
The first significant stretch of heat this year already has some residents yearning for the cooler days of early spring, but they'll have to wait until the end of the week for some relief. Temperatures in downtown Baltimore reached 95 degrees Tuesday, which was notably above the mid-80s weather that's typical this time of year, according to the National Weather Service. The all-time high for June 17 was 96 degrees in 1939. The Tuesday high at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, where records are measured now, was 94. Kurt Miller, wearing a dress shirt and trousers, cursed the heat while as he walked through downtown Baltimore on his lunch break.
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BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | May 20, 2011
Folks, it's been so rainy the past few days that next week's forecasts of 80+-degree days could feel like a shock. And if this is the first time you consider firing up your cooling system, your electricity bills a month from now might seem even more shocking. So, consider taking some preventative measures Saturday (while temps are still in the high 70s) to keep things cool without blowing your budget. The Environmental Protection Agency's Energy Star program suggests these tips: Change to More Efficient Light Bulbs.
NEWS
July 21, 2013
I am in full agreement with John Davis Held's letter about Artscape and the hot weather ("Artscape in July is too darn hot," July 18). My wife and I always looked forward to attending but could only do so if the weather cooperated. It would be wonderful to hold this event in the spring or fall when sweltering 90 degree-plus heat is not likely. Certainly, this would attract more visitors and vendors of quality artwork. Please feel free to forward my comments to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake as well as the organizers of Artscape.
NEWS
July 6, 2010
We can't do anything to change the weather, so we might as well accept it. Complaining about record high temperatures is so yesterday. According to the forecast it could also be so today, so tomorrow and possibly so Friday. Instead of whining about big heat, members of previous generations used it to improve their powers of humorous description. When the temperature soared, they said it was hotter than a hen in a wool blanket, hotter than a burnt boot, hotter than the hinges of Hades, hotter than the devil's underwear, hotter than love in haying time, or hotter than blue blazes.
EXPLORE
By Sheila S. Peter, sheila.peter@verizon.net, 410-323-8526 | August 8, 2011
At this writing, it is positively chilly - 91 degrees. But warmer temperatures are on the way. After all, it is summer! Well, this summer Melinda Cianos' dream came true. When one embarks on a big undertaking, it's always nice to have the love and support of family, friends and neighbors. Melinda certainly had it, and her achievement of a bachelor's degree in education - at age 45 - is the result! "People talk about a village, and that is exactly what Rodgers Forge is," she said.
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | June 10, 2001
Some sports demand hot weather; others go on despite it. If your're training or playing in hot weather some things to think about: * Can you train very early, or late, to avoid the heat of the day. * Think water. Drink lots -- before, during and after exercise. The days of depriving athletes of water in hot weather went away at least 25 years ago. Water, some say, is preferable to high-calorie sports drinks, which may be more suitable for exceptional athletes. * Think shade when your're stretching or cooling off, be it trees, tents, umbrellas or other souces to avoid direct sun. * Wear a hat, if at all possible.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 26, 2012
Temperatures in the 90s returned to Harford County Thursday and were expected through Friday, if not longer, prompting the county to take steps to protect residents. With the heat index expected to reach nearly 105 degrees on Thursday, Harford County government, in cooperation with Harford County Public Library and the Harford County Health Department, once again used local libraries as cooling centers for the public. One incident involving heat exposure was reported on the opening day of the Harford County Farm Fair in Bel Air Thursday afternoon.
FEATURES
By Gabe Mirkin, M.D. and Gabe Mirkin, M.D.,United Feature Syndicate | July 30, 1991
Hot summer weather can sap your strength, reduce your endurance and throw your athletic performance way off balance.If you are a marathon runner, for example, you should expect to add 5 to 15 minutes to your time; pace yourself accordingly. A tennis player who normally can blast a serve at 100 mph might lose up to 15 mph when playing in the heat. Every athlete, when competing in the heat, eventually learns to hold back early to have something left in reserve.This time of year, your heart must work harder.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt and Dolly Merritt,Special to the Sun | July 6, 1994
Staying cool when temperatures are high and the humidity is soup-thick can be a challenge for everyone. But it's a necessity for seniors.Dehydration, heat exhaustion, even sunburn can be serious hazards for those whose bodies already are fragile from age or illness.To help guard against such threats, doctors and health officials who work with the elderly urge precautions that include avoiding long exposure to the heat and staying aware of the body's need for water when the weather gets hot.Barbara Miller, coordinator of the health-wellness program operated by the county's Office on Aging also stresses the importance of staying indoors.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
The weather page in The Sun's Sunday print edition warned of a wet long-term forecast for Labor Day weekend and the Grand Prix of Baltimore. As the weekend nears, though, the weather is looking dry -- and hot. The National Weather Service is forecasting partly to mostly cloudy skies and highs in the mid- to upper-80s for Friday, Saturday and Sunday. AccuWeather.com is forecasting highs of 90 degrees Friday and Saturday and 86 on Monday. The biggest chance of rain appears to be on Monday, with about a 40 percent chance of precipitation, according to the Climate Prediction Center.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | July 26, 2012
With a daytime high of 98 degrees in Owings Mills according to Weather.com, staying cool at Ravens training camp was a challenge for the players and coaches on the practice fields. Wide receivers Torrey Smith and LaQuan Williams both dealt with leg cramps caused by dehydration, and at one point, free safety Ed Reed wondered aloud where the I.V. drips were. Fans who attended Thursday afternoon's session were treated to popsicles. Still, coach John Harbaugh said the hot and humid weather is a good barometer for how diligent the players were during the offseason.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 26, 2012
Temperatures in the 90s returned to Harford County Thursday and were expected through Friday, if not longer, prompting the county to take steps to protect residents. With the heat index expected to reach nearly 105 degrees on Thursday, Harford County government, in cooperation with Harford County Public Library and the Harford County Health Department, once again used local libraries as cooling centers for the public. One incident involving heat exposure was reported on the opening day of the Harford County Farm Fair in Bel Air Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
Queenstown farmer John Draper's corn crop looks bleak - ears that normally have 18 or 20 rows of kernels have 14 rows due to a lack of rain. Others have few or shriveled kernels, and some stalks haven't grown any ears at all. Yet, with a shot at harvesting about 60 percent of his normal yield, Draper considers himself fortunate. Drought conditions that have persisted across Maryland are expected to cut this year's corn crop yield in half. The weather also is threatening soybean crops, and driving up prices for all types of grains, squeezing livestock and poultry farmers.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
With record highs on tap for the next few days , experts are reminding us to keep an eye out on our kids and vehicles. The Howard County Police are asking people to remember the kids can get overheated very quickly, and that cars parked in direct sunlight can reach temperatures of 131 degrees to 172 degrees F when outside temperatures are 80-100, and we're expecting higher than 100. "It's critical that caregivers know it is never safe...
NEWS
By Scott Dance | June 19, 2012
The hot weather spell arriving Wednesday could break multiple records. With high temperatures predicted in the upper 90s Wednesday and Thursday, records of 100 degrees for both days could be challenged. The National Weather Service was predicting highs of 98 degrees Wednesday and 100 degrees Thursday, as of Monday night, though the predictions have fluctuated as the heat gets closer. A heat advisory could be issued Wednesday. Lows are forecast at 80 and 79 degrees overnight, also vying to top records for the highest low temperatures of 78 degrees Wednesday and 79 degrees Thursday.
SPORTS
By MUPHEN WHITNEY | June 27, 1993
Karen Holloway, extension agent for agricultural science in Howard County, is celebrating her first year in the position. She came to the Howard extension office in July last year after several years in the same post in Allegany County."
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Joe Mathews and Norris P. West and Joe Mathews,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writers John Rivera, Rafael Alvarez and Robert Hilson Jr. contributed to this article | July 18, 1995
The high temperatures steaming Maryland played a role in six deaths in the state and caused the first-ever derailment of a Metro subway train yesterday.The deaths of Robert Podowski, a double amputee, and that of an unidentified Baltimore man may have been directly caused by heat, said Dr. John E. Smialek, the state medical examiner.Autopsies are being performed on both men, he said.Mr. Podowski, 39, was found Sunday in a van near 26th Street and Hampden Avenue in Hampden. He had been living in the van.The unidentified man suffered from heart disease and a lung infection.
FEATURES
By Bailey Shiffler and Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
Summer sickness isn't limited to humans -- watch for these common hot weather pet problems. Paw burns or cuts What it looks like: Your pet will likely be limping or avoiding walking on the affected paw, says Kim Hammond, owner and director of Falls Road Animal Hospital. The paw might be red, and the pad might be cracked, he said. What to do: If the pad is torn, raw or bleeding, Hammond recommends you take your pet to its vet for a checkup, as this can lead to infection.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 25, 2012
Hot weather in the Baltimore area should drive many to Ocean City this weekend, where cooler weather and sunshine should greet them. The National Weather Service is forecasting highs in the upper 70s with partly cloudy skies and virtually no chance of rain through the Memorial Day weekend. It may not sound too hot, but with a bright sun and high humidity, it should make for nice early-season beach days. The ocean water temperature is running about 66 degrees. Waves are about 2-3 feet high, and the risk of rip currents is low, according to the weather service's surf forecast . Ocean City businesses and tourism officials are expecting the nice weather to drive in tourists for a strong start to the summer.
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