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ENTERTAINMENT
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,Special to the Sun | June 25, 2000
"Hot Springs," by Stephen Hunter. Simon & Schuster. 478 pages. $25. Don't tell the Million Moms, but Stephen Hunter's gun-crazy Swagger boys are back, setting a very bad example on the gun issue. Tommy guns, .45 automatics, Winchester 97 shotguns, M-1 carbines and even Browning automatics are all cheerfully blazing away in Hunter's latest thriller, in a running series of bloody shoot-em-ups. "Hot Springs" is set in 1946. Marine Medal of Honor winner Earl Swagger, son of brutal, race-baiting Sheriff Charles Swagger, has been picked to lead an elite secret team to clean up that legendary Arkansas fleshpot.
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SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | April 13, 2008
Youth was served yesterday at the 98th running of the My Lady's Manor steeplechase in Monkton, but only after race stewards decided that a veteran was a little too far out of line coming toward the finish. Erin Go Bragh, with seasoned rider Paddy Young in the irons, crossed the wire first by no more than a neck, edging Hot Springs, guided by 20-year-old Darren Nagle. But after a film review of the race, the three stewards awarded the victory to Hot Springs, citing a foul by Erin Go Bragh.
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SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | April 13, 2008
Youth was served yesterday at the 98th running of the My Lady's Manor steeplechase in Monkton, but only after race stewards decided that a veteran was a little too far out of line coming toward the finish. Erin Go Bragh, with seasoned rider Paddy Young in the irons, crossed the wire first by no more than a neck, edging Hot Springs, guided by 20-year-old Darren Nagle. But after a film review of the race, the three stewards awarded the victory to Hot Springs, citing a foul by Erin Go Bragh.
NEWS
By JOAN HENNESSY and JOAN HENNESSY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 9, 2005
He was old. And stiff. And troubled by rheumatism. But in 1818, Thomas Jefferson took to the waters of Warm Springs, Va., and found the experience to his satisfaction. To this day, the springs where he bathed are called the Jefferson Pools. In those days, people didn't talk about stress management or letting go or good karma. But they believed, as many believe today, that the springs are therapeutic. When you're neck deep in steamy water, they say, a fundamental truth becomes clear: Finally, something you crave may actually be good for you. For many of us, the reasoning works.
FEATURES
By Linda DuVal and Linda DuVal,COLORADO SPRINGS GAZETTE TELEGRAPH | August 11, 1996
This place has the makings for a great family vacation -- hot-spring pools with water slides, dinosaur digs, fine fishing and baby buffaloes. What more could you ask of a tiny Wyoming town ringed by the Rockies in the middle of nowhere?Thermopolis -- Greek for "hot" and "city" -- is indeed a hot spot, with the world's largest natural hot springs. But a city it's not. There's not much more than two days' worth of entertainment, and you might not be inclined to make it a final destination. But it's definitely worth a stop on your way to or from, say, Yellowstone National Park or the Grand Tetons, both just a couple of hours away.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Staff Writer | August 28, 1992
HOT SPRINGS -- Earlier this month, when the Arkansas town of Hope erected a billboard along Interstate 30 declaring itself Bill Clinton's "birthplace," this city 80 miles northeast answered with a 40-foot banner across Central Avenue proclaiming itself his "boyhood home."The sudden burst of pride in the Democratic presidential candidate has less to do with honoring a hometown boy than with cashing in on his newfound celebrity.Truth is, neither community did much public bragging about their governor -- who was born in Hope and moved at age 7 to Hot Springs -- until he received the nomination last month.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2004
A teenager admitted yesterday that he fatally shot the driver of a moving car in which he was a passenger just outside Annapolis last year - though why he killed him remains unclear. Ervin Demontray Montague, 18, of no fixed address, pleaded guilty in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to second-degree murder and a handgun violation in the April 20, 2003, death of a Crofton man, Aaron Kirk Howard, 33. Lawyers said they could not pinpoint a motive for the slaying, though Assistant State's Attorney Lawrence J. Caporale said Montague told a relative that he had beaten Howard with a golf club a month earlier in a dispute over $200.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | July 27, 1997
HOT SPRINGS, N.C. -- Tourism, the lifeblood industry of the western North Carolina mountains, has been hurt this month by a huge July 1 rock slide that continues to block both lanes of Interstate 40 near the Tennessee line.From the regal grounds of the Biltmore House in Asheville to the intimate dining porch of Bridge Street Cafe in this tiny resort town, tourism is off in what should be the busiest month of the year.Though the slide does not impede travel to Ashville from the south or east, tourism officials say surveys indicate that visitation is down from all markets, including metro Atlanta, which is Asheville's biggest draw.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2004
A teenager admitted yesterday that he fatally shot the driver of a moving car in which he was a passenger just outside Annapolis last year - though why he killed him remains unclear. Ervin Demontray Montague, 18, of no fixed address, pleaded guilty in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to second-degree murder and a handgun violation in the April 20, 2003, death of a Crofton man, Aaron Kirk Howard, 33. Lawyers said they could not pinpoint a motive for the slaying, though Assistant State's Attorney Lawrence J. Caporale said Montague told a relative that he had beaten Howard with a golf club a month earlier in a dispute over $200.
FEATURES
By Dee Brown and Dee Brown,Contributing Writer | January 17, 1993
Shortly before publication of "The Red Badge of Courage," Stephen Crane visited Arkansas while free-lancing for a Philadelphia newspaper. "As soon as the train reaches the great pine belt of Arkansas," he said, "one becomes aware of the intoxication of the resinous air. It is heavy, fragrant with the odor from the vast pine tracts and its subtle influence contains a prophecy of the spirit of the little city afar in the hills."This winey-piney aroma is ever present around Hope, Hot Springs and Little Rock.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2004
A teenager admitted yesterday that he fatally shot the driver of a moving car in which he was a passenger just outside Annapolis last year - though why he killed him remains unclear. Ervin Demontray Montague, 18, of no fixed address, pleaded guilty in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to second-degree murder and a handgun violation in the April 20, 2003, death of a Crofton man, Aaron Kirk Howard, 33. Lawyers said they could not pinpoint a motive for the slaying, though Assistant State's Attorney Lawrence J. Caporale said Montague told a relative that he had beaten Howard with a golf club a month earlier in a dispute over $200.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2004
A teenager admitted yesterday that he fatally shot the driver of a moving car in which he was a passenger just outside Annapolis last year - though why he killed him remains unclear. Ervin Demontray Montague, 18, of no fixed address, pleaded guilty in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to second-degree murder and a handgun violation in the April 20, 2003, death of a Crofton man, Aaron Kirk Howard, 33. Lawyers said they could not pinpoint a motive for the slaying, though Assistant State's Attorney Lawrence J. Caporale said Montague told a relative that he had beaten Howard with a golf club a month earlier in a dispute over $200.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2003
Together we make 100 years. One hundred years of fortitude, I said. One hundred years of fun, my friend Cynthia Jabs said. We were on a plane to New Mexico. Awhile back, we promised that in 2003, the year we each turned 50, we would celebrate with a getaway. We met at a party in Baltimore about 18 years ago and became fast friends. Life is crazy, so weeks often passed without contact. Still, we seemed to keep track of one another telepathically and through occasional phone calls, lunches and social gatherings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,Special to the Sun | June 25, 2000
"Hot Springs," by Stephen Hunter. Simon & Schuster. 478 pages. $25. Don't tell the Million Moms, but Stephen Hunter's gun-crazy Swagger boys are back, setting a very bad example on the gun issue. Tommy guns, .45 automatics, Winchester 97 shotguns, M-1 carbines and even Browning automatics are all cheerfully blazing away in Hunter's latest thriller, in a running series of bloody shoot-em-ups. "Hot Springs" is set in 1946. Marine Medal of Honor winner Earl Swagger, son of brutal, race-baiting Sheriff Charles Swagger, has been picked to lead an elite secret team to clean up that legendary Arkansas fleshpot.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2000
For two and a half months, the popular hot-springs resort of Banos in central Ecuador was a ghost town. Twenty-five thousand residents of the town and nearby countryside had fled, or were evacuated on Oct. 16 after the nearby Tungurahua volcano came to life. Scientists warned there was an 80 percent chance of an eruption, and that hot gas and ash from Tungurahua -- "Throat of Fire" in the Quechua Indian language -- could overrun parts of Banos. Since then the town has been spared by the tremors, steam explosions and ash clouds that have burst from the shuddering mountain.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | July 27, 1997
HOT SPRINGS, N.C. -- Tourism, the lifeblood industry of the western North Carolina mountains, has been hurt this month by a huge July 1 rock slide that continues to block both lanes of Interstate 40 near the Tennessee line.From the regal grounds of the Biltmore House in Asheville to the intimate dining porch of Bridge Street Cafe in this tiny resort town, tourism is off in what should be the busiest month of the year.Though the slide does not impede travel to Ashville from the south or east, tourism officials say surveys indicate that visitation is down from all markets, including metro Atlanta, which is Asheville's biggest draw.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 29, 1993
A window screen lying on the sidewalk, or a pipe jutting out across a pathway, or sudsy water flowing out of a drainpipe and across the street in front of us, are things we hardly notice as we make our way on foot from place to place. We make the mental adjustment and step over or around, while most of our mind is concentrated elsewhere.Ah, but if we were blind! Then such things could be hazards to life and limb, as Gary Cawood teaches us in "Obstacles," one of his series of photographs on view at Goucher College.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2000
For two and a half months, the popular hot-springs resort of Banos in central Ecuador was a ghost town. Twenty-five thousand residents of the town and nearby countryside had fled, or were evacuated on Oct. 16 after the nearby Tungurahua volcano came to life. Scientists warned there was an 80 percent chance of an eruption, and that hot gas and ash from Tungurahua -- "Throat of Fire" in the Quechua Indian language -- could overrun parts of Banos. Since then the town has been spared by the tremors, steam explosions and ash clouds that have burst from the shuddering mountain.
FEATURES
By Linda DuVal and Linda DuVal,COLORADO SPRINGS GAZETTE TELEGRAPH | August 11, 1996
This place has the makings for a great family vacation -- hot-spring pools with water slides, dinosaur digs, fine fishing and baby buffaloes. What more could you ask of a tiny Wyoming town ringed by the Rockies in the middle of nowhere?Thermopolis -- Greek for "hot" and "city" -- is indeed a hot spot, with the world's largest natural hot springs. But a city it's not. There's not much more than two days' worth of entertainment, and you might not be inclined to make it a final destination. But it's definitely worth a stop on your way to or from, say, Yellowstone National Park or the Grand Tetons, both just a couple of hours away.
FEATURES
By Lynne Muller and Lynne Muller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 1996
Spotlighting the surface of the crystalline pool with a bright patch of turquoise, sunshine pours through the circular roof of the women's bathhouse at Warm Springs, Va.A few bathers float in and out of sunshine and shadow as the sun's rays penetrate to the rocky bottom of the clear spring water. The bathhouse, which has stood here since 1826, is illuminated in soft green light.Next door is the 1761 men's bathhouse, the oldest spa structure in America.I soak up history along with iron, calcium and bicarbonates.
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