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By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Chili peppers are the sadists of the fruit kingdom. They love nothing better than to make people look like a child after watching "Old Yeller. " Teary eyes, a runny nose, whimpering and an animalistic craving for cold water (which won't help, by the way) can be the result of eating chili peppers. There are many different varieties of chili peppers, each with different levels of heat. From June until late November, the local farmers' markets sell many of these varieties. From the uncommon Bangalore torpedo to the ever-present jalapeno, farmers' markets contain a surprising wealth of pepper diversity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
If you're inviting company over for the premiere of the HBO Beyonce documentary on Saturday night -- isn't everybody? -- here's a sandwich for you to make your guests, courtesy of Hooplaha.com - Life With a Smile. You can find the recipe and photos here . There's even a step-by-step video. The Beyonce sandwich stacks Popeyes fried chicken, three strips of bacon, hot sauce, blue cheese crumbles and jelly on Texas toast. There's some logic at play. Texas Toast celebrates the Houston native's home state.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 16, 1994
As a raw oyster eater I experiment with toppings. Sometimes I squirt some lemon juice on the raw oysters. Sometimes some horseradish. Sometimes nothing.When I heard about researchers who found that sprinkling hot sauce on raw oysters clobbered bacteria, I wanted to learn more about this report. And I wanted to give the hot sauce routine a try.One thing I learned quickly. Nobody was claiming that a few shakes of hot sauce on a raw oyster automatically made the oyster safe for everyone to eat. Rather, a pair of Louisiana researchers found that hot sauce had wiped out bacteria on the surface of the raw oyster meat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
Let's get this out of the way: This week's recipe is not health food. It's not foodie food. And it's not particularly pretty food. But this warm Buffalo chicken dip is hearty, rich, comforting, and it's got just enough hot-sauce afterburn to help warm you up during a chilly tailgate party. In short, it's perfect football food. Made as directed, you can serve it in a crockpot if you've got a plug in the back of your vehicle. You can also heat it in a 350-degree oven in a casserole dish until the cheese melts and bring it on over to your event.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
Along with goggles and gas masks, U.S. soldiers in Iraq are carrying another item into battle - mini bottles of Tabasco sauce, packed in their food rations. The fiery pepper sauce, produced since 1868 by the McIlhenny Co. on Avery Island in Louisiana, has spiced up military meals for more than a century. "One of my distant cousins sent a case of Tabasco to Ulysses S. Grant when he was president," says Paul McIlhenny, company president. That still counts, because Grant was a Civil War general, he says.
FEATURES
By Seattle Times | June 7, 1998
Here are ideas for buying and using hot pepper sauces:* When buying a hot sauce, consider its flavorings as well as its heat level.* Refrigerate opened bottles of hot sauce to retain the flavors.* Shake hot sauces before using.* When using a hot sauce in a recipe, add it near the end of cooking, if possible, to preserve more of the flavor.* When adding hot sauce to a dish, start with a very small amount, then taste and add more if desired, making sure it's not too hot. With many dishes, diners can add more hot sauce at the table, if they want.
FEATURES
September 26, 2001
For the tailgate feast With the return of football, the fall tailgating season is officially under way, and Hot Sauce Harry's stands ready to fire up your pre-game feast. The Texas-based company is offering officially licensed NFL TailGate PartyPacks for each of the 32 NFL teams. The Ravens PartyPack includes a 5-ounce bottle of medium-heat cayenne hot sauce, a 16-ounce jar of medium-heat chunky picante salsa and a 16-ounce jar of sweet and smoky barbecue sauce. Each bottle carries the Baltimore Ravens logo.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | April 23, 1993
Ray Evans wants the unobtainable: A Harley Original splashed with the special hot sauce that has disappeared since the sandwich shops closed.Evans, 57, who repairs MGs and Jaguars in Glen Burnie, grew up on the foods that the king of cold cuts and delicious jazz offered to Baltimore from the 1940s through the 1980s."
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | April 9, 1997
What you get: 1 pound, 5 ounces (about two 2 1/4 -cup servings)Cost: $2.99Time to prepare: 15 minutes on stovetopReview: This pleasant blend of noodles and crunchy vegetables (broccoli, green beans, red peppers and carrots) gets smothered by the overabundant hot sauce -- even after tossing with boneless chicken breast. Add the optional peanuts and snow peas or bamboo shoots, and you'll diffuse the sauce, creating a fair imitation of Kung Pao chicken. No MSG here, but you'll get 60 percent of a day's dose of salt with each serving.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2011
This year, Woodberry Kitchen is selling a select group of "Preservation Society" items, spices, sauces and preserves that are prepared for the restaurant. The selection includes hot sauce, Cybee's honey and fish pepper and espelette sauces as well as Counter Culture coffee and Woodberry Kitchen T-shirts. The goods are available for sale at Woodberry Kitchen on weekdays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. So are attractively designed Woodberry Kitchen gift certificates, which you can also purchase by calling the restaurant 410-464-8000 or online at woodberrykitchen.com .  
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Chili peppers are the sadists of the fruit kingdom. They love nothing better than to make people look like a child after watching "Old Yeller. " Teary eyes, a runny nose, whimpering and an animalistic craving for cold water (which won't help, by the way) can be the result of eating chili peppers. There are many different varieties of chili peppers, each with different levels of heat. From June until late November, the local farmers' markets sell many of these varieties. From the uncommon Bangalore torpedo to the ever-present jalapeno, farmers' markets contain a surprising wealth of pepper diversity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2011
This year, Woodberry Kitchen is selling a select group of "Preservation Society" items, spices, sauces and preserves that are prepared for the restaurant. The selection includes hot sauce, Cybee's honey and fish pepper and espelette sauces as well as Counter Culture coffee and Woodberry Kitchen T-shirts. The goods are available for sale at Woodberry Kitchen on weekdays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. So are attractively designed Woodberry Kitchen gift certificates, which you can also purchase by calling the restaurant 410-464-8000 or online at woodberrykitchen.com .  
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2011
Former Baltimorean Steve Raichlen — author of "The Barbecue Bible," "How To Grill" and "Planet Barbeque!" — recently added to his impressive cookbook collection with the release of an eBook titled "Raichlen's Tailgating: 31 Righteous Recipes for On-the-Go Grilling. " Raichlen, who has firmly established himself as master of all things barbecue, has now turned his attention to the distinctly American institution of tailgating. As Raichlen observes in his introduction, "Tailgating would appear to be little more than a big, rambunctious party in a parking lot. But scratch beneath the surface of the beer- and brat-fueled conviviality and you'll discover a raw desire to win. Yes, tailgating itself has become a competition sport.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2011
The dish : Tai Chin ($6.95) At the very least, this pho with round steak and brisket is as accessible to the first-timer as any Vietnamese recipe, aside from, maybe, a spring roll. The pho curious can start with Tai Chin as an introduction to an exotic staple at a bargain price. For the pho lover who wouldn't dream of a bowl without tendon and tripe, An Loi offers, in all, a dozen pho selections. Given the exceptionally neutral tones of cooked beef and rice noodles, the broth needs to carry the day. An Loi's Tai Chin does, with subtly and a deceptively simple flavor.
NEWS
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2011
Is football — more specifically, Thursday's Ravens-49ers game, the first time a Baltimore NFL team has played on Thanksgiving in 46 years — threatening to overshadow your holiday meal plans? Instead of fighting the game, why not embrace it? To help, we've recast the traditional Thanksgiving foods with a tailgate twist. You can still have your turkey, your stuffing, your potatoes, your greens, your pie, but in a game-friendly way. Think of it as a tailgate party at your table.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2010
— Ray Rice is seeking his third straight 100-yard rushing game against the Patriots when the Ravens square off against them in a high-profile AFC showdown. Rice's family can empathize with New England coach Bill Belichick and the Patriots. They know how it feels to be terrorized by the precocious running back. With the same exuberance he uses to "creep up on linebackers," Rice waits for family members to fall asleep before unleashing one of his classic practical jokes. His brother got baby powder sprinkled all over him when he nodded off. A cousin got a bullhorn blasted in his ear in the middle of the night.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
If you're inviting company over for the premiere of the HBO Beyonce documentary on Saturday night -- isn't everybody? -- here's a sandwich for you to make your guests, courtesy of Hooplaha.com - Life With a Smile. You can find the recipe and photos here . There's even a step-by-step video. The Beyonce sandwich stacks Popeyes fried chicken, three strips of bacon, hot sauce, blue cheese crumbles and jelly on Texas toast. There's some logic at play. Texas Toast celebrates the Houston native's home state.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
Let's get this out of the way: This week's recipe is not health food. It's not foodie food. And it's not particularly pretty food. But this warm Buffalo chicken dip is hearty, rich, comforting, and it's got just enough hot-sauce afterburn to help warm you up during a chilly tailgate party. In short, it's perfect football food. Made as directed, you can serve it in a crockpot if you've got a plug in the back of your vehicle. You can also heat it in a 350-degree oven in a casserole dish until the cheese melts and bring it on over to your event.
NEWS
September 25, 2010
This is the time of year when men make hot sauce. Gallons of it. Much of it named "nuclear" or "killer" or, in case of John "Boog" Powell, a habanero pepper sauce that he calls "Not a Child's Playting. " The lure of hot sauce has as much to do with derring-do and a tolerance for pain as with taste, and according to recent scholarship out of Yale, it may be the one thing that truly separates man from beast. Anecdotal evidence suggests that "man," in this instance, is the operative word.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | February 3, 2010
S omething about Super Bowl brings out our national craving for wings and fire. During the course of this weekend, hungry Americans will polish off more than 100 million pounds of chicken wings, many drenched in hot sauce. The stats of this big wing weekend are staggering. According to the National Chicken Council - the group that is to chickens what the NFL is to football - about 1.25 billion wing portions will be consumed during Super Bowl weekend. The demand for wings has grown so fast that wings now cost more per pound than chicken breasts.
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