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NEWS
By Roger Twigg and Roger Twigg,Staff Writer | March 17, 1992
Baltimore County police officials have begun an investigation to determine whether an officer violated procedures in chasing a car several miles on West Baltimore streets early yesterday before it crashed, killing a 16-year-old passenger."
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SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,ken.murray@baltsun.com | August 12, 2009
A heat wave and a head slap precipitated a fight in the Ravens' morning practice at McDaniel College on Tuesday. As luck would have it, the Washington Redskins arrive at M&T Bank Stadium to relieve training camp tensions in the preseason opener Thursday night. "We're definitely fed up playing against each other," cornerback Frank Walker said after scuffling with wide receiver Yamon Figurs. "We're definitely looking forward to competing against another team this Thursday. We've been competing against each other for two weeks now, and tempers flare."
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NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | October 9, 1991
Spurred by the hotel industry's concern for guests' privacy and its own liability, the County Council voted Monday to restrict police officers' access to hotel records.As submitted by County Executive Robert R. Neall, the records-inspection bill would require hotels, motels, bed-and-breakfast inns and other "transient lodging facilities" to hand over guests' registration and phone records whenever a policeofficer asks for them.In a compromise with hotel operators, the council changed the bill so that hoteliers do not have to give police the records if more than seven days have passed since a guest checked out.The amendment-- one of six approved by the council -- gives hotel operators the right to request written authorization from the police chief that the inspection is part of a criminal investigation.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | July 11, 2009
When the Baltimore City Police Department invited me to spend a day with its officers recently, I had visions of myself in a bulletproof vest tearing though the streets in hot pursuit of bad guys, or swooping down in a chopper on the trail of a burglary in progress. Alas, that's not quite what my hosts had in mind. Instead, they wanted me to appreciate the heroic - or at least extremely extensive - efforts the department is making to ensure that the crime reports its officers submit are timely, accurate and complete.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 5, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Former Secretary of State George P. Shultz, at a ceremony last week renaming the National Foreign Affairs Training Center in his honor, had a novel way of describing how Sept. 11 has changed U.S. policy in dealing with outside threats. In calling on other countries to root out terrorism within their own borders, Mr. Shultz said, "We also reserve, within the framework of our right to self-defense, the right to preempt terrorist threats within a state's borders." The new concept, he said, is "not just hot pursuit," but also "hot preemption."
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko | May 27, 2007
Staying put? Brian Burres might not have a guaranteed spot in the rotation, but he did nothing to hurt his chances of staying in it. Making only his fourth major league start, Burres held Oakland to one run and three hits in six innings. He retired the first 10 batters he faced before Nick Swisher homered in the fourth inning. Burres could have been rusty while working on nine days' rest, but he looked pretty sharp. Spark at the top Leadoff hitter Brian Roberts remains hot, which makes it a little easier for the Orioles to score runs.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | June 5, 1995
It's about time that Jack O'Malley, the Cook County state's attorney, receive praise and glory for cracking down on men who have sex with underage females.This is the crime that used to be called statutory rape. It now has another name, but it still adds up to men having their way with females under 17.Most people aren't aware of how often this happens. But you need only look at the teen-age birth rate.In Chicago, more than 10,000 unmarried teen-age girls have babies every year. In the suburbs, another 2,000 to 3,000.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | July 11, 2009
When the Baltimore City Police Department invited me to spend a day with its officers recently, I had visions of myself in a bulletproof vest tearing though the streets in hot pursuit of bad guys, or swooping down in a chopper on the trail of a burglary in progress. Alas, that's not quite what my hosts had in mind. Instead, they wanted me to appreciate the heroic - or at least extremely extensive - efforts the department is making to ensure that the crime reports its officers submit are timely, accurate and complete.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | December 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - There are few things you can count on in life. But one is that NATO will end its annual summit, as it did a few weeks ago, with a call for the creation of "a NATO rapid reaction force" to deal with the "new threats of the 21st century." When all else fails, when you can't think of anything for an alliance to do, call for a rapid reaction force. I weep for the trees that will now be chopped down for all the think-tank studies about what this NATO force should do. A NATO rapid reaction force?
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 3, 1998
"The Opposite of Sex" is one of those scrappy little human serio-comedies for which the word "quirky" seemed to be invented. And Dedee Truitt would just hate that. Dedee, a hard-looking, tough-talking, 16-year-old runaway from Louisiana, can't stand words like "scrappy" and "quirky." They make her want to puke. She makes her world-view quite clear early in her narration of "The Opposite of Sex." She has "no heart of gold, and I'm not going to grow one, either." So there. One of the supreme accomplishments of "The Opposite of Sex" is that it bears such warmth and humor in spite of its toxic center.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | June 10, 2009
Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III is set to participate in a 10-mile run June 20 to benefit the Baltimore Police Foundation - and the amount of money raised will be dictated by how fast he can run. The University of Maryland Heart Center Baltimore 10-Miler, which starts at Druid Hill Park, is expected to feature more than 3,000 runners. The last one off the starting line will be Bealefeld. Corrigan Sports Enterprises, a local sports promotion group, has pledged to donate $2 for each runner Bealefeld passes, with police trainees slapping "Caught by the Commish" stickers on those left in the commissioner's dust.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | April 23, 2009
Cornerback has undergone more change than any other position on the Ravens, but their offseason restocking of the secondary might not be complete. The Ravens are considering taking a cornerback in the early rounds of the NFL draft, and they are intrigued by Illinois' Vontae Davis in the first round and Utah's Sean Smith in the second. "I think corners are like pitchers in baseball - you can never have enough," said Eric DeCosta, the Ravens' director of player personnel. "You never want to get beat because your corners aren't good enough to play or not healthy.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | November 27, 2007
When the University of Maryland's medical school wanted to raise its profile in the burgeoning field of genomics, officials recruited one of the world's leading experts - and her 60-member team. When the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center saw a hole in its program dealing with public health preparedness and bioterrorism, its officials thought big too - and lured an entire institute of researchers then at the Johns Hopkins University. For others on the hunt for talent, the goal might be young researchers - preferably those with scientific credentials validated by a major grant underwriting their work.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko | May 27, 2007
Staying put? Brian Burres might not have a guaranteed spot in the rotation, but he did nothing to hurt his chances of staying in it. Making only his fourth major league start, Burres held Oakland to one run and three hits in six innings. He retired the first 10 batters he faced before Nick Swisher homered in the fourth inning. Burres could have been rusty while working on nine days' rest, but he looked pretty sharp. Spark at the top Leadoff hitter Brian Roberts remains hot, which makes it a little easier for the Orioles to score runs.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | December 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - There are few things you can count on in life. But one is that NATO will end its annual summit, as it did a few weeks ago, with a call for the creation of "a NATO rapid reaction force" to deal with the "new threats of the 21st century." When all else fails, when you can't think of anything for an alliance to do, call for a rapid reaction force. I weep for the trees that will now be chopped down for all the think-tank studies about what this NATO force should do. A NATO rapid reaction force?
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2002
GLENS FALLS, N.Y. - A hand-lettered sign taped to gas station pumps at the edge of the Adirondack Mountains seems like a rustic prop designed for tourists: "Fall is Here. Watch for Deer." It's hardly a quaint joke. From Maine to Iowa, officials and motorists dread the last three months of the year. That is when bucks chase does - and collisions between deer and vehicles soar. At Cool Beans, a coffee shop about a mile off Interstate 87, which cuts through Adirondack Park, morning conversation is dotted with stories about deer darting out from roadside brush and motorists' evasive maneuvers worthy of James Bond.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | June 10, 2009
Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III is set to participate in a 10-mile run June 20 to benefit the Baltimore Police Foundation - and the amount of money raised will be dictated by how fast he can run. The University of Maryland Heart Center Baltimore 10-Miler, which starts at Druid Hill Park, is expected to feature more than 3,000 runners. The last one off the starting line will be Bealefeld. Corrigan Sports Enterprises, a local sports promotion group, has pledged to donate $2 for each runner Bealefeld passes, with police trainees slapping "Caught by the Commish" stickers on those left in the commissioner's dust.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 2, 1997
I HAVE BECOME a bean counter. Now if I spill any coffee beans, I begin a full-scale, down- on-my-knees search for the missing ones. This aggressive, bean-chasing behavior is new for me.Not long ago, if I spilled beans while putting them in the grinder, I would only pick up the ones that were easy to find. I retrieved the beans sitting on the kitchen counter. But I ignored the ones that had fallen to the kitchen floor.Then the price of coffee went up, about $1 a pound for the kind of beans, Yirgacheffe and Golden Sumatra, that I buy, and my habits changed.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 5, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Former Secretary of State George P. Shultz, at a ceremony last week renaming the National Foreign Affairs Training Center in his honor, had a novel way of describing how Sept. 11 has changed U.S. policy in dealing with outside threats. In calling on other countries to root out terrorism within their own borders, Mr. Shultz said, "We also reserve, within the framework of our right to self-defense, the right to preempt terrorist threats within a state's borders." The new concept, he said, is "not just hot pursuit," but also "hot preemption."
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