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By Brian Hamilton, Tribune newspapers | June 4, 2010
PHILADELPHIA — The line currently torching the Blackhawks in the Stanley Cup finals was, not too long ago, cinders. From Jan. 23 to March 3, Ville Leino didn't play a game. Scott Hartnell's hair follicles offered more production than his blade. And in terms of full-season output, Danny Briere was at levels not seen since his rookie season. So Flyers coach Peter Laviolette concocted this grouping late in the season because, well, he had to. "When he put us together, there were so many injuries that that's what was left, I guess," Briere said Thursday.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
A phone number for filing complaints about Baltimore police officers connected callers this week instead to an adult chat line advertising "hot ladies. " The toll-free 800 number listed on the site until earlier this week was supposed be a 24-7 hot line for an internal investigations detective. But that's not what greeted callers. "Welcome to America's hottest talk line," a recorded female voice said. "Guys, hot ladies are waiting to talk with you. " The Web page was dated April 28, 2008, at 4:24 a.m. but a note at the bottom said it was updated on Dec. 18, 2012, at 11:39 p.m. It listed only the Public Affairs Office as its author.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | October 11, 2010
The weekend started well, with the Ken Harris jury coming back with guilty verdicts after seven days of deliberations that made everyone suspect the three defendants were going to walk. Police, prosecutors and forensics experts put together a case strong enough to get convictions of young men who wore masks when they set out to commit their crimes. The alternative would have been shocking even in hard-to-shock Baltimore: Jurors acquitting the accused killers of a well-liked, public-spirited man during the armed robbery of a popular jazz club in a solid, middle-class part of town.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Michael Mershon can get pretty stirred up about lighting. He's been working in the business for more than 30 years, most of that time in Maryland, and said he's seen local governments waste millions of dollars on lighting jobs through contract practices that were sloppy, or worse. He was worked up enough early last year to file a complaint with the Howard County auditor, detailing how companies he was representing were prevented from bidding against a large lighting company for a job on a county athletic field.
NEWS
February 27, 2010
Harford County has set up a pothole hot line for complaints about roads damaged by snow, ice and fluctuating temperatures. The county's Division of Highways is asking residents who spot problems to call the hot line at 410-638-3376. Officials say crews are prepared to respond to those calls and repair potholes as quickly as possible. - Mary Gail Hare
NEWS
November 26, 2009
Federal and state leaders are launching an effort to win funding for a statewide hot line to help connect Marylanders with health and human service. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski has requested $800,000 to make the state's 211 hot line pilot program permanent and is co-sponsoring a bill that would provide dedicated funding for such services nationwide. Gov. Martin O'Malley, Comptroller Peter Franchot and United Way of Central Maryland President Larry Walton joined Mikulski to announce the effort to secure federal funding at the call center in Baltimore on Monday.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2010
Twenty-one women who say their reports of rape or sexual abuse were dismissed by Baltimore police have reached out to a hot line established this week to ensure that officials are handling complaints properly. More than half of them asked authorities to reopen their criminal case and pursue possible leads. All their reports will be forwarded to auditors seeking to find out why Baltimore police lead the nation in the percentage of possible sex crimes that detectives conclude are false or baseless.
NEWS
November 14, 1990
A hot line that helps consumers with the complexities of telephone service has chosen Carroll County for a pilot campaign to alert senior citizens to the free advice.The Tele-Consumer Hotline, based in Washington, serves all age groups at its hot line number -- (800) 332-1124. The non-profit group began in 1984 to help consumers after the breakup of AT & T and advent of a more complex telephone market, said executive director Sylvia Rosenthal.The hot line gets questions such as where to get special equipment for people with impaired hearing or vision or how to understand the different long-distance services.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2010
City leaders are establishing a hot line for victims who believe their reports of rape or sexual assault were not investigated fully by police. Officials announced Tuesday that the staff of the victim advocates group Turnaround Inc. will partner with the city to operate the rape and sexual assault hot line. The announcement comes after a Baltimore Sun investigation which revealed that, based on FBI crime data, Baltimore has logged a higher percentage of rape cases that officers deem false or baseless than any other U.S. city.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Staff Writer | December 2, 1993
The Anne Arundel Trade Council is launching a legislative hot line on Tuesday for county residents who want their views relayed to county council members.The hot line is primarily intended as an information-sharing resource, more than an "I'm-against-this or I'm-for-that" hot line, said Jeanette Wessel, chief executive officer of the Trade Council.Council employees will write down the views of callers who leave them and tell legislators what comes in over the phone lines, regardless of whether the views coincide with the trade council's position on various issues.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2011
As the application deadline loomed for vendors who want to participate in a fundraising event in Bel Air next month, Hazel U. Hopkins fretted that a favorite caterer might have forgotten to sign up. So she drove an application to the business in Kingsville, waited for the owner to fill it out and then returned it to the offices of SARC, a nonprofit organization dedicated to ending domestic violence, in Bel Air. That kind of go-the-extra-mile determination...
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
Describing their eight-day investigation of a teen-ager's disappearance as "basically at square one," Baltimore police have added an unprecedented array of resources to the search — including half the homicide squad — and have drawn help from national and state authorities. The FBI has agreed to fly in two helicopters equipped with advanced technology to aid city police in the search for Phylicia Simone Barnes, a North Carolina honor student. Police set up a 24-hour hot line Wednesday to receive tips.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | October 11, 2010
The weekend started well, with the Ken Harris jury coming back with guilty verdicts after seven days of deliberations that made everyone suspect the three defendants were going to walk. Police, prosecutors and forensics experts put together a case strong enough to get convictions of young men who wore masks when they set out to commit their crimes. The alternative would have been shocking even in hard-to-shock Baltimore: Jurors acquitting the accused killers of a well-liked, public-spirited man during the armed robbery of a popular jazz club in a solid, middle-class part of town.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2010
City Council President Bernard "Jack" Young introduced a resolution Monday night calling for law enforcement officials to explain to the council the "factors behind Baltimore's troublingly high percentage of reported rape cases" that are categorized as false or baseless. The Baltimore Sun reported last month that Baltimore has for years led the country in the percentage of rape cases deemed "unfounded" by detectives — police parlance for saying the victims were lying. Moreover, four in 10 calls to 911 for rape don't generate a report at all. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has already asked a panel of law enforcement officials and victim advocates to review the department's policies and procedures, and a team of detectives is expected to review 18 months' worth of data.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2010
Twenty-one women who say their reports of rape or sexual abuse were dismissed by Baltimore police have reached out to a hot line established this week to ensure that officials are handling complaints properly. More than half of them asked authorities to reopen their criminal case and pursue possible leads. All their reports will be forwarded to auditors seeking to find out why Baltimore police lead the nation in the percentage of possible sex crimes that detectives conclude are false or baseless.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2010
City leaders are establishing a hot line for victims who believe their reports of rape or sexual assault were not investigated fully by police. Officials announced Tuesday that the staff of the victim advocates group Turnaround Inc. will partner with the city to operate the rape and sexual assault hot line. The announcement comes after a Baltimore Sun investigation which revealed that, based on FBI crime data, Baltimore has logged a higher percentage of rape cases that officers deem false or baseless than any other U.S. city.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | March 10, 2006
Howard County police receive about one or two calls a week on their "party buster" hot line that takes tips about coming parties involving underage drinking, police spokeswoman Sherry Llewellyn said. Mark Heron, the county's alcohol enforcement officer, checks the phone line's voice mail every day. People can leave anonymous messages or include their names. "Oftentimes, once word gets out that someone has tipped off the police, the party gets canceled," Llewellyn said. "Rumors spread pretty fast, and we'd rather have the party not happen at all. We think the line is serving our goal when that happens."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 18, 1998
The Baltimore FBI office and the Maryland U.S. attorney's office have established a 24-hour hot line for citizens to report environmental crimes, especially those involving the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.Local, state and federal law enforcement officials also have formed the Chesapeake Bay Environmental Enforcement Coalition, which held its first meeting Wednesday at the Naval Academy in Annapolis.The coalition seeks to improve conservation efforts and environmental compliance in the bay area.
NEWS
By Brian Hamilton, Tribune newspapers | June 4, 2010
PHILADELPHIA — The line currently torching the Blackhawks in the Stanley Cup finals was, not too long ago, cinders. From Jan. 23 to March 3, Ville Leino didn't play a game. Scott Hartnell's hair follicles offered more production than his blade. And in terms of full-season output, Danny Briere was at levels not seen since his rookie season. So Flyers coach Peter Laviolette concocted this grouping late in the season because, well, he had to. "When he put us together, there were so many injuries that that's what was left, I guess," Briere said Thursday.
NEWS
February 27, 2010
Harford County has set up a pothole hot line for complaints about roads damaged by snow, ice and fluctuating temperatures. The county's Division of Highways is asking residents who spot problems to call the hot line at 410-638-3376. Officials say crews are prepared to respond to those calls and repair potholes as quickly as possible. - Mary Gail Hare
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