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Hot Dog Cart

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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | October 24, 2007
At virtually every hall of justice in Maryland, there seems to be a hot dog cart. Several explanations come to mind. Hot dogs, like our courts, are "of the people." Both the courts and hot dog stands draw a lot of traffic. Finally, reporters who cover the courts tell me that whenever an officer of the law makes a court appearance, it is customary for him or her to stop at a hot dog cart for fuel. Baltimore City Circuit Court Address --100 N. Calvert St. Hours --11 a.m.-3 p.m. weekdays Two sidewalk carts are set up on both sides of the 100 block of N. Calvert, near the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2011
Lee Silk does landscaping and drives a green Ford pickup with equipment thrown in the back and likes his hot dogs with mustard, nothing too elaborate. Lately, though, he's been stopping for lunch several times a week at Falls Road and West Lake Avenue, where there's this hot dog stand with ambition, a stand pressing the boundaries of the form. As Silk says, referring to the proprietor behind the grill, "He tries to talk me into the fancy stuff. " With some success, it seems, as Haute Dogs' owner, Daniel Raffel, recalled Silk's recent purchase of a dog made with Italian sausage prepared in a wine reduction.
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NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2000
When an ambushed car careened into William Henderson's cart in Harlem Park recently, it was the first time in five years there were no free hot dogs for the community's welfare-dependent children during their hungry last days of each month. For half a decade, hundreds of desperate children have flocked to Edmondson Avenue and North Carey Street to get a free hot dog and soda from Henderson when their parents' food stamps are depleted, leaving refrigerators empty. But last month, the droves of children, some walking a dozen blocks, came to the West Baltimore corner looking for the traditional meal, but instead found the hot dog cart gone.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | October 24, 2007
At virtually every hall of justice in Maryland, there seems to be a hot dog cart. Several explanations come to mind. Hot dogs, like our courts, are "of the people." Both the courts and hot dog stands draw a lot of traffic. Finally, reporters who cover the courts tell me that whenever an officer of the law makes a court appearance, it is customary for him or her to stop at a hot dog cart for fuel. Baltimore City Circuit Court Address --100 N. Calvert St. Hours --11 a.m.-3 p.m. weekdays Two sidewalk carts are set up on both sides of the 100 block of N. Calvert, near the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse.
NEWS
By Joe Eaton and Joe Eaton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 2004
It is commonly said that today's college degrees are yesterday's high school diplomas. But for those who think the days are gone when a person with little more than hustle and nerve could make a good living, consider Dave Mitchell, the hot dog peddler of Bel Air. Two days before Christmas in 1984, Mitchell parked his car across the street from a bar in Perry Hall and walked across a dark intersection to meet a friend. He did not reach the other side. A car clipped Mitchell and fled, leaving him on the ground, the bones in his right ankle smashed to bits.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2000
The eyes of dozens of Harlem Park children twinkled yesterday when William Henderson wheeled a shiny new deluxe hot dog cart into a concrete park lined with ruined homes, vacant lots and drug addicts. Fatima Knight, 11, said the cart was the nicest thing she had seen in Harlem Park since five years ago, when she got a new pair of roller skates. Her brother, 10-year-old Rasheem, said it was the nicest thing he had seen since last summer, when neighborhood boys let him touch a new dirt bike.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2011
Lee Silk does landscaping and drives a green Ford pickup with equipment thrown in the back and likes his hot dogs with mustard, nothing too elaborate. Lately, though, he's been stopping for lunch several times a week at Falls Road and West Lake Avenue, where there's this hot dog stand with ambition, a stand pressing the boundaries of the form. As Silk says, referring to the proprietor behind the grill, "He tries to talk me into the fancy stuff. " With some success, it seems, as Haute Dogs' owner, Daniel Raffel, recalled Silk's recent purchase of a dog made with Italian sausage prepared in a wine reduction.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun Reporter | January 1, 2007
Ted Kastanakis flips the lid on a compartment of his hot dog cart. It opens with a clang, sending a cloud of steam pouring into the cold winter air. With metal tongs he pulls out a pink frank and nestles it on a bun. The blond woman and young girl standing nearby watch carefully as he squirts a bead of ketchup along the frank and dabs on some mustard. The hot dog is for the girl. "Can you turn the dog a little so the ketchup won't spill over?" the woman asks. "And a lot of napkins, please."
NEWS
March 24, 2000
Response to plight of vendor reveals role of private aid William Henderson, better known as the "hot dog man" of Harlem Park, may have been surprised at the pledges of support he received to repair his hot dog cart in response to The Sun's article "A setback for `hot dog man'" (March 13). Mr. Henderson may have felt he was alone in his work to feed the hungry children of his neighborhood at the end of every month when welfare funds get lean. He may have felt that no one cared. The "hot dog man" has now learned what our elected representatives have yet to figure out: People are willing to give when they know where their money is going and can see immediate results.
NEWS
January 13, 2008
Carl N. Karcher, 90 Founder of fast-food chain Carl N. Karcher, who parlayed a $325 investment in a hot-dog cart into one of the biggest hamburger chains in the western U.S., died last week. He suffered from Parkinson's disease and was being treated for pneumonia. Mr. Karcher founded Carl's Jr., which has more than 1,000 locations.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun Reporter | January 1, 2007
Ted Kastanakis flips the lid on a compartment of his hot dog cart. It opens with a clang, sending a cloud of steam pouring into the cold winter air. With metal tongs he pulls out a pink frank and nestles it on a bun. The blond woman and young girl standing nearby watch carefully as he squirts a bead of ketchup along the frank and dabs on some mustard. The hot dog is for the girl. "Can you turn the dog a little so the ketchup won't spill over?" the woman asks. "And a lot of napkins, please."
NEWS
By Joe Eaton and Joe Eaton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 2004
It is commonly said that today's college degrees are yesterday's high school diplomas. But for those who think the days are gone when a person with little more than hustle and nerve could make a good living, consider Dave Mitchell, the hot dog peddler of Bel Air. Two days before Christmas in 1984, Mitchell parked his car across the street from a bar in Perry Hall and walked across a dark intersection to meet a friend. He did not reach the other side. A car clipped Mitchell and fled, leaving him on the ground, the bones in his right ankle smashed to bits.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2000
The eyes of dozens of Harlem Park children twinkled yesterday when William Henderson wheeled a shiny new deluxe hot dog cart into a concrete park lined with ruined homes, vacant lots and drug addicts. Fatima Knight, 11, said the cart was the nicest thing she had seen in Harlem Park since five years ago, when she got a new pair of roller skates. Her brother, 10-year-old Rasheem, said it was the nicest thing he had seen since last summer, when neighborhood boys let him touch a new dirt bike.
NEWS
March 24, 2000
Response to plight of vendor reveals role of private aid William Henderson, better known as the "hot dog man" of Harlem Park, may have been surprised at the pledges of support he received to repair his hot dog cart in response to The Sun's article "A setback for `hot dog man'" (March 13). Mr. Henderson may have felt he was alone in his work to feed the hungry children of his neighborhood at the end of every month when welfare funds get lean. He may have felt that no one cared. The "hot dog man" has now learned what our elected representatives have yet to figure out: People are willing to give when they know where their money is going and can see immediate results.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2000
When an ambushed car careened into William Henderson's cart in Harlem Park recently, it was the first time in five years there were no free hot dogs for the community's welfare-dependent children during their hungry last days of each month. For half a decade, hundreds of desperate children have flocked to Edmondson Avenue and North Carey Street to get a free hot dog and soda from Henderson when their parents' food stamps are depleted, leaving refrigerators empty. But last month, the droves of children, some walking a dozen blocks, came to the West Baltimore corner looking for the traditional meal, but instead found the hot dog cart gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2011
Eli the kid critic reviews the Haute Dog cart on Falls Road on the Advenutres of a Koodie blog. Jason Knauer, Eli's father, photogrpahed Eli on the porch of Bonjour French Bakery/Cafe with his sister, Olivia, and brother, Owen. How many stars did Eli give to Daniel Raffel's gourmet hot-dog cart? Find out on Adventures of a Koodie .
NEWS
November 26, 2001
Upper-level roadway, commercial lane shut starting today The upper-level terminal road and the lower-level commercial vehicle lane at Baltimore-Washington International Airport will be closed from midnight to 4 a.m. today through Friday. The outer portion of the lower-level road will remain open. The upper-level closure will begin where the upper-level ramp splits from Interstate 195. Construction crews will build an elevated pedestrian bridge from the top of the parking garage into the terminal, part of BWI's planned $1.8 billion expansion.
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